Customer Reviews for

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: Dawn of the Dreadfuls

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

Surprisingly Amazing

I didn't know how I would feel about this book when I first picked it up. I absolutely adored Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, but I didn't think it was possible to make a prequel. Elizabeth is as smart and snarky as you would expect her to be. I think any fan of Jane A...
I didn't know how I would feel about this book when I first picked it up. I absolutely adored Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, but I didn't think it was possible to make a prequel. Elizabeth is as smart and snarky as you would expect her to be. I think any fan of Jane Austen should definitely get into the zombified version of her books.

posted by Daniee on May 9, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

I hated this book

I hated this book so much! I felt like it would never end! I never even finished the whole thing it was so bad. No one should ever read it!

posted by 10189110 on October 19, 2011

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  • Posted July 26, 2011

    Great fun, takes classic Jane Austen to a macabre new level!

    This is a great read for all who "had to read" any of Jane Austen for a required English credit.
    But such fun! Classic Victorian England combined with dare I say Zombies.
    This prequel sets the tone for all the series of classic "zombie" combinations.
    For those who enjoy the classics but like a wistful turn, read these!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2013

    Terrorific

    Seeing the Bennet sisters as zombie assassins was different. Lizzy was still mouthy self and Jane quiet but Mary was the change up. She was more a character than she was in the original pride and prejudice. Fast paced and if your a zombie reader this is a book for you.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2014

    Good book

    Combined two of my favorite things zombies and pride and prejudice

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2013

    Should i

    Im having a hard time deciding if i should read this.
    Please comment back if i should or not.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2013

    Fun read

    I am a big zombie fan and this was a fun read.

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  • Posted March 21, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Spunky and original!

    The success of P&P&Z bought a new genre to the world of Jane Austen fan fiction, the mash-up. Many fans clamored for more and Quirk classics and Steve Hockensmith happily listened to them and brought us a prequel to P&P&Z, Dawn of the Dreadfuls. Set four years before the events of P&P&Z, Dawn of the Dreadfuls tackles the questions of "how did Elizabeth Bennet turn into such a fearsome warrior?" and "how did the dreadfuls come about?" The inhabitants of Meryton live a nice quiet life attending balls, dinner parties, masses, weddings, and funerals with no fear of the dreadfuls. The funeral that takes place at the beginning of the novel changes all of that. In the middle of the service the corpse sits up in its coffin and comes back alive. Mr. Bennet, a veteran of the last war of the dreadfuls years earlier, knows how to stop this zombie from hurting anyone. Getting everyone out of the church except Lizzie, Mary, the priest, and himself, they quickly discuss what must be done to kill the zombie. This singular event causes Mr. Bennet to panic because the unmentionables are back in England! Rushing back home after the funeral Mr. Bennet turns the family's greenhouse into an outdoor dojo and begins trying to train his five daughters in the deadly arts. (The deadly arts are a mixture of ninja skills and martial arts training). Seeing that all is not going well in their training Mr. Bennet writes to some "friends in the east" and is sent eighteen year old Master Hawksworth. It's up to Hawksworth to turn the Longbourn ladies into unmentionable warriors. Will he succeed and make warriors out of them, or will he fail and see them fall to zombies?? Dawn of the Dreadfuls was SO much better than the original. I think a lot had to do with the fact that it was a completely new and unique storyline. There was no original text that Hockensmith needed to change around or alter, and that added to the pleasure I had in reading it. Hockensmith weaves his own storyline into what Grahame-Smith originally wrote seamlessly. His rendition of how Elizabeth became the fearsome warrior she was in P&P&Z was awesome, but most importantly it was believable. What we see in her starts out as uncertainty in her abilities and turns to complete belief in her strength and passion as a warrior. Hockensmith has an uncanny ability to get into Elizabeth's head and write her in a way that makes the reader understand her journey. Hockensmith also gives us a large amount of colorful characters that adds to the humor of the novel. The funniest character by far has to be the armless and legless Capt Cannon. He is strapped into a wheel barrel and is "driven" around by two soldiers who he calls left limb and right limb. His characterization is so eccentric that it's just humorous. Over the course of the novel you come to find out that Cannon was Mrs. Bennet's first love. There is one scene where he is in the sitting room with Mrs. Bennet reading her poetry, and in the middle of a sonnet yells for his right limb to give Mrs. Bennet a rose and for his left limb to turn the page. The ridiculousness of his character added to my enjoyment of the novel infinitely. Between the interesting character additions and unique storyline I found myself snickering throughout the novel. Even if you didn't like the original, you should definitely try reading Dawn of the Dreadfuls. This new and fresh storyline was really intruigi

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  • Posted March 1, 2011

    Highly Recommended

    The Dawn of the Dreadfuls is essentially a prequel to the book Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. It was writen by Steve Hockensmith and came out in March 2010. Both books were written by two different authors, but the ideas are synonymous between the two. The Dawn of the Dreadfuls is a work of fiction set several years before the Pride and Prejudice story telling of a zombie infestation in Meryton and Hertfordshire. The Bennets are the only ones who can save their village due to their Shaolin warrior training which began shortly after the zombies came. For the Jane Austen fans, they should only read it if they have a morbid sense of humor.
    This book was very enjoyable to read. I, myself, am a Jane Austen fanatic and thought it was amusing because of the absolutely ridiculous storyline--English ladies killing zombies with katanas? Pshaw! The book was fantastically morbid with an excess amount of blood and guts. the Dawn of the Dreadfuls may be offensive to some Jane Austen fans, but this book gives much credit to the imagination. Steve Hockensmith used an excellent set of resources, creativity, and hmor to make a book worth reading.
    It was very interesting while reading this book to feel how at odds the characters are with the setting. You even begin to feel it within the first few chapters of the book. Regency society does not take well with female warriors. The Bennets were shunned by their village due to unladylike appearance and manners. However, while society was busy shutting them out, the Bennet girls were developing. They went from weak, ignorant countryside girls who embroiodered cushions and played the pianoforte to fierce and deadly warriors. Later on, the villagers realize how much they need the Bennets to save them, which was predictable, but true to form.
    this is one of the more entertaining books I have read. This books is very good to go along with Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. Both have "Jane Austen rolling in her grave" and illustrate a lot of creativity. One warning to readers--it is grossly morbid, so if you don't like blood and guts, then don't read it. Also, like I said before, Jane Austen fans who are interested in reading this books should have a fairly morbid sense of humor.

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  • Posted July 26, 2010

    A little bit of fun!

    Just face it, many of us who are Jane Austen fans are on the romantic side. You really have to love Pride and Prejudice and have a major sense of humor. I was always amused and smiled often. My only wish was that they had put more P&P charectors instead of adding new charectors. A little Bingley and Darcy needed to be in this book.

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  • Posted May 8, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Fans of Jane Austen should be warned this version of Regency England is more guts and gore than romance and wit

    The absurdity of melding the paranormal with the beloved characters of Jane Austen is an unexpected mix. In the prequel to the best-selling Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, Steve Hockensmith relies more on his own creative impulses in Dawn of the Dreadfuls instead of heavily borrowing from the immortal classic. However, the end result is a horrendous conglomeration of The Karate Kid, Frankenstein, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Masterpiece Theatre.

    The comic book style antics begin with the town apothecary rising during his funeral and the discovery of a missing seamstress's reanimated corpse in a nearby lake. Mr. Bennet - whose first name turns out to be Oscar - is a veteran of the zombie wars of yore. He grudgingly realizes it is time to train his daughters in the deadful arts. Their instruction is soon usurped by the dashing Master Hawksworth who puts the girls through their paces in the martial arts transforming them into warriors. His strict facade is only pierced by his admiration for the innate courage of Elizabeth Bennet.

    Lydia and Kitty at age eleven and twelve differ little from their later incarnations. Even at a young age, they show a propensity to giggle and fawn over any handsome man they encounter. Mary is more fully realized showing a stout heart and developing unrequited feelings for their new master. Jane is bland and over-trusting in Meryton's reigning noble, Lord Lumpley. Employed as his bodyguard, the repulsive coward gets more than he bargains for when he fixes his lecherous eye on her.

    While feeling physically drawn to Master Hawksworth, it is the absent-minded Dr. Keckilpenny who actually saves Elizabeth from an unmentionable. The good doctor captures a zombie in order to use science and rational thought to reawaken its humanity. Elizabeth is enthralled by the workings of his mind, yet she questions his detachment from reality.

    The elder women are given more depth and range than most of the Bennet sisters. Mrs. Bennet is reunited with her first love, the now fully amputated Captain Cannon, who was forced to leave her in their youth in order to subdue a zombie outbreak. The still infatuated soldier pledges his love for Mrs. Bennet - to of all people - Mr. Bennet. The lovestruck captain proclaims his intent to finally marry Mrs. Bennet should her husband succumb to the jaws of an unmentionable.

    But the biggest surprise is the warrior background of Lady Catherine de Burgh who is viewed as a national heroine throughout all of England for her renown against the undead. Her prowess is held in high esteem and the Bennet sisters strive to attain her level of greatness. It is Lady Catherine who plays a pivotal role upon the climatic siege of Lord Lumpley's Netherfield ball by thousands of zombies ravenous for their glutenous fill of human brains.

    The novel contains over a dozen illustrations by Patrick Arrasmith highlighting pivotal scenes containing the putrefied flesh and deformed countenances of the unmentionables. The Bennet sisters arrayed in practical, simplistic Grecian inspired frocks are shown wielding swords, knives and pistols. One noticeable omission is the lack of an artistic representation of Master Hawksworth whose English gentleman meets Asian warrior demeanor garners much feminine ardor.

    Overall, fans of Jane Austen should be warned this version of Regency England is more guts and gore than romance and wit.

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  • Posted March 3, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Great prequel, filled with gore and humor!

    I can tell you, that I LOVED this book as much as P & P & Z. It had the wonderful moments of humor and wit that I experienced before and enjoyed. You will see the original characters except for a few (no Darcy or Bingley here, sorry. This does take place before they met Lizzy and Jane). You read more about Mr Bennet who seems to take a more active role in the story (he helps trains his daughters to become warrior women). However the book also introduces new memorable ones which will prove unforgettable and absolutely hilarious to read. What I thought was interesting was the nice reference made with the mysterious "soldier" the left and broke Mrs Bennet's heart when she was a girl. If you're well versed in P & P then you'd know what I'm taking about. It's these little references to the main novel that make the prequel do justice to P & P & Z. Readers also be advised, this book is meant to be a parody, and a funny one at that. If you treat it with a sense of humor, enjoyment is increased tenfold.

    Of the new characters, I enjoyed Dr Keckilpenny (really, with a name like that, what's not to enjoy?) the most. First, because no one seems to get his name right (except for Lizzy), and second because he just seemed to be so friendly and so likable. Lord Lumpley played your average greaseball with a secret - I especially enjoyed how he tried his advances on Jane, but to no avail. Then you get one of the most interesting characters I have ever seen, and that is Captain Cannon who uses four of his soldiers as arms and limbs (you have just to read it to get a good laugh). The moment I started reading about his arms and limbs made me laugh, but it made the book much more enjoyable with these kinds of new, strange yet quirky characters.

    The book was very well written, the plot flowed well and did not stop. The humor was in the right places at the right times so reading this book was enjoyable and fun. There is gore. Lots of it. I think moreso than P & P & Z. So, if you are not into that sort of theme. Perhaps this book may not be for you. However this would be great for zombie fans and will satisfy P & P & Z readers, it's a well done prequel and will be listed as one of my favorites for 2010.

    Overall, I love this book. What I would like to see next, is another zombie novel but with Darcy and Bingley before they met the Bennet sisters. That would be interesting, I think. Who knows where the Dreadfuls will strike next?

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