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Proof of Heaven: A Neurosurgeon's Journey into the Afterlife

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

192 out of 220 people found this review helpful.

As a physician and NDE researcher, I highly recommend this book.

As a physician and NDE researcher, I highly recommend this book. Dr. Alexander's book, like Dr. Mary Neal's book, "To Heaven and Back," includes the important elements of an NDE, including recognition of being in a different dimension, meetings with unusual b...
As a physician and NDE researcher, I highly recommend this book. Dr. Alexander's book, like Dr. Mary Neal's book, "To Heaven and Back," includes the important elements of an NDE, including recognition of being in a different dimension, meetings with unusual beings, feelings of being accepted and welcomed, and a realization that we are all part of the universe, and carry divine universality in us at all times. Dr. Alexander includes his own research in this great book, conducted after his NDE, where he shows how he is working through the many questions that his experience engendered. His book also shows how he, as a physician, had to let go of engrained thinking about the possibility of NDEs and his colleagues skeptical views of NDE, after surviving his own NDE. A masterful book, beautifully written, and sure to become a classic of true NDE literature. Recommended for all who really want to learn about a true NDE, and about current scientific thinking about NDEs and the directions that NDE research is taking. It is wonderful that, like Dr. Neal, Dr. Alexander does not focus on "religion" in the books. It is interesting to note that the survivors of NDEs do not usually focus on religion as being important. Instead, based on years of talking to them, survivors of true NDEs have moved beyond religion to focus on compassion and humanity, as they have report that there is no religion in the afterlife, but there is a higher consciousness that we are all one, and that goodness and light live in the community of universal consciousness, which erases the people-made divisions of "religion." Please note that to date, no survivor of a true NDE has returned to promote only their religion, or to become hysterical if someone dies and is not a member of that same religion. Survivors of a true NDE report the opposite, and that we are all important in the afterlife, with an emphasis on the divinity found in all of us. Anyone using a story of NDE phenomena to promote their personal view of religion is being misleading, as that is simply marketing with a view to making money, and not truthful reporting of an NDE to increase knowledge and respect for all.

posted by TiredofGarbage on November 13, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

113 out of 411 people found this review helpful.

Disappointing

If you are a Christian and loved "Heaven is for Real" and are expecting the same thing you will be disappointed. In my opinion, this experience is in several ways, not scriptural. In fact, the Bible is not cited that I can recall. In this account a large part of heaven ...
If you are a Christian and loved "Heaven is for Real" and are expecting the same thing you will be disappointed. In my opinion, this experience is in several ways, not scriptural. In fact, the Bible is not cited that I can recall. In this account a large part of heaven was darkness and there was no mention of meeting Jesus. Might make the beginnings of an episode of "Fringe" though. I certainly would not recommend to a Christian that is not grounded in Scripture.

posted by Anonymous on October 28, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2012

    What proof

    I was anxiously awaiting the arrival of this book only to be disapponted after reading it. If i wanted to know so much about mengitis we would not have bought it but we wanted to know about his out of body experience to heaven, not much of that in this book. Most of the contents of the book is the index which relates to the books the author read before publishing his own. Many of those books offer a farther in depth view of what proof there is of heaven than this book leads me to believe. If you want an autobiography of a neurosurgeon's life who was adopted and survived a deadly disease, this for you. I would suggest other books for stronger proof that heaven is for real.

    65 out of 99 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2012

    This was not a biblical account but a personal account of what D

    This was not a biblical account but a personal account of what Dr. Eben Alexander experienced. If you are looking for a by the numbers book( based on scripture) this isn't it. It is well written and thought provoking. It left me feeling like he shared an intimate part of his spiritual experience and I appreciated every minute of it.

    9 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2012

    Those who really want to believe will believe. Those who do not

    Those who really want to believe will believe. Those who do not, will not. And all of these reviews are just that, the result of open or closed minds. I don't necessarily believe Dr. Alexander's story, but I do believe that people either want to believe in God or they don't. These reviews demonstrate nothing more than that.

    9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2013

    A good read from an unusual perspective. What makes thi

    A good read from an unusual perspective. What makes this story even more unusual is that the author
    seems to have made it his new calling -giving talks and setting up a web site. I don't know about all the other reviews but I for one would never doubt what someone else had experienced. The author and other writers had said that heaven cannot be put into words or described in mortal terms. That for me hints at something
    more than our physical world. There are no experts only people of faith who don't choose to know who's experience is real.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2012

    One man's vision

    As Shakespeare once wrote "There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, then are dreamt of in your philosophy". Each person's vision of the afterlife reflects their upbringing & beliefs. There's no right or wrong here.

    5 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2013

    Clearly the author (and his readers) have never experienced a DM

    Clearly the author (and his readers) have never experienced a DMT "trip" before.

    The NDE that the author describes is amazingly similar to the experiences of thousands of people who have taken DMT (dimethyltryptamine). In fact, it is significantly possible that the author's experience was caused by the DMT naturally produced in the human brain.

    A "trip" on DMT lasts only approximately 15 minutes, however the subjective experience can feel timeless. Similar claims can be made of dreams, which seem to last for days but happen in the span of a few hours. Likewise, the NDE that the author experienced likely happened during the brief moments of consciousness preceding and following his coma. His experiences could easily have happened in that amount of time.

    Neuroscientists have examined his case and those of people who have had DMT experiences, and there are many striking similarities. Keep in mind, the author is a neurosurgeon, not a neuroscientist. Similar, but not the same.

    This isn't to say that Heaven isn't real, nor is it to say that his experience wasn't valid. The point I am trying to make is this: do not take this book as solid proof of Heaven. Explore the science involved. Learn about DMT and the experiences of people who have taken it. Educate yourself thoroughly. Only then can you make a truly educated decision as to the existence (or non-existence) of Heaven.

    Just because it says Ph.D by his name does not mean that he is infallible or 100% correct.

    This is a fascinating read, but take it with a grain of salt.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 27, 2012

    This is well written and easy to follow; however proof? Where?

    This is well written and easy to follow; however proof? Where? This is no different than ANY book that claims to prove the existence of 'God'. The author simply can't do it. I did not buy this book, it was a gift from my mother this year for Xmas. Of course, being a skeptic and a realist I decided to give it a try. I'm only about 1/2 way through the book, but rest assured that the dreams or whatever the thoughts he had while he was 'out' are nothing more than that.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2013

    Recommend

    This is a good book to read because it gives you the facts of the story from the view point and the experience of a" professional" skeptic. The doctors story lets you know from the beginning that he did not believe in such things, then it happens to him. It's not a dynamic book to read but it is interesting and gives a sense of satisfaction that the good doctor gained some good insight to what patients sometimes go thru.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 4, 2013

    An okay read

    I was really looking forward to reading this so when it came I sat down with it immediately. It did not live up to my expectations, which were perhaps too high. Finished it in one sitting, so it is interesting. But I found it somewhat unengaging, for some reason. Nonetheless, it is worth the read.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 1, 2013

    This was a pretty good read. I soaked it up until about 2/3 of t

    This was a pretty good read. I soaked it up until about 2/3 of the way through when it became apparent that he had no new insights to offer on spiritual truths. The only "message" comes on page 46: "You are loved and cherished, dearly, forever. You have nothing to fear. There is nothing you can do wrong." That's it. Supposedly he had multiple encounters with God in the "core" where God taught him many things, much faster than could possibly happen on earth. But what were they? He says God, or "Om" as he calls Him, told him of many universes (anyone heard of the mult-universe theory in physics?). He says that evil is necessary for free will and is sprinkled throughout the universes, though earth has an extra share. He says that explanations will be found for dark matter and dark energy (I could have said that!). And that's about it. For all the timeless time he spent with Om, that's all he could come up with? And if we are supposedly eternal beings, without beginning or end, then shouldn't he have already spent time with Om before his earthly incarnation learning these things? Did he have to relearn them after already having an eternity to study? Do beings get stupid in heaven? At one point he says that it will take years to unpack all that he learned with Om. Can we expect future volumes where he doles out his rediscovered insights? -- Oh please, I hope not. So, by the last 1/3 of the book, all hope of any interesting insights was dashed and I ended the book feeling generally disappointed. Still, it was a pretty good read and I did enjoy most of it.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 24, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Thought-provoking

    I was brought up without religion and always scoffed at those who needed the idea of heaven. My mother was a nurse who, when I told her my dying friend saw angels, told me it was the hallucination of a dying brain. She told me there are no such things as angels or heaven. She said if it gave my friend comfort, great, but it could be explained medically. I wanted to believe my friend was met by nurturing beings who accompanied her to the beyond but......I am generally a rational and realistic person so I pretty much believed what my mother told me was so.

    When my mother was dying, she talked to her long-dead uncle. Was she delirious? Was he meeting her to accompany her on her journey? Was there a journey to take? The jury was still out but it helped me to think that maybe it wasn't the end. So I was drawn to this book because it was written by a neurosurgeon, a man of science, a man not unlike my rational mother. If he can believe......

    The jury is still out. I want to believe (except for the nightmare of the Worm's Eye Realm which I would prefer to not believe). He sounds like a nice, normal, very intelligent, hard-working man dedicated to his work and his family. He himself was a skeptic. He appeased those who spoke of an afterlife. Until he experienced it for himself. Except...what was it that he experienced? He calls it heaven, an eternal consciousness apart from his earthly existence, an unconditional love and acceptance from a higher being who is us and more than us.

    I can't say I understand all of the medical stuff he explains. He does say that to experience a near death experience, there has to be some level of consciousness of which he had none while in his deep coma. So what is an alternative explanation? While it was statistically possible for him to spontaneously contract the type of meningitis he did, what were the odds? Although it WAS statistically possible. But apparently it was NOT statistically possible for him to survive it, especially without brain damage. He was an N of one. But then so was the virgin birth. So the jury is still out. I would like to believe.....

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 20, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Interesting supporting approach to NDE from a physician's point of view

    Author is a neurologist who approaches Near Death Experience from a clinicians background. The NDE experience described is very interesting as related by the author. The author does well with the struggle to describe the experience of feelings and translating medical jargon into common understandable language.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2014

    I'm still waiting on proof

    I picked this book to read because it would look like something I would enjoy. A story told by a neurosurgeon who contracted bacterial menginitis and fell into a coma for seven days. And during this coma he believes to be in heaven. He goes on to talk about his family life and how he was raised which is introduced in the first part of the book. Then after that he kept going on and on talking about nothing that had to do with the summary of the book. Otherwise, it was an okay story, but something I wouldn't think of as a NY Times Bestseller.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 15, 2013

    recommend with some reservations

    I hesitated to purchase this book due to one of the reviews...that the book is technical and very medical/neurologically focused...clincal. However, after hearing an NPR discussion, I decided to make the purchase. After reading it I confess I should have believed the one reviewer. The book certainly is informative/educational but it also seemed to me to be an attempt by Dr. Alexander to convince his medical colleagues of "the truth" of his experience. Thus less focused on the interested but not medically educated reader. I do believe in life after death and people experiencing near death experiences as Dr. Alexander described. I've simply read other books with similar descriptions which were more enjoyable to read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 30, 2012

    A little too "medical" for me, but a great story...and

    A little too "medical" for me, but a great story...and very convincing.  Am grateful he is sharing his story with skeptics from the scientific world.  

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 15, 2012

    Highly Recommended ~ Heaven Does Exist

    This is an excellent book, written by a doctor who doesn't really believe in the existence of a Heaven and isn't even really sure that there is an All-Powerful God that watches over us. He is a scientist. He cannot reconcile the two. Then he is in a coma. What he learns while in that coma changes him for the rest of his life. Some of the book was a bit scientific because he is a scientist, which was difficult for a person like me to get through but still I persevered and thoroughly enjoyed the book. I give it 5 stars because it captured my attention and held it throughout the book. It was difficult to put down. I kept wanting to read more about his experiences. I think you will, as well.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2012

    Interesting read but one has to wonder if Dr. Alexander had not

    Interesting read but one has to wonder if Dr. Alexander had not been a religious church goer before his coma episode would he have had the same nde.

    2 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 10, 2013

    Very little of this book relates to EA's heavenly experience.

    Most of the book focused on Dr A's family's experience as well as medical jargon relating to his meningitis. I was not troubled by the divergence from traditional religious teachings. I simply was seeking a more thorough characterization of the NDE.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2013

    Interesting reading, but far out!

    Make sure you read the Christian rebuttal by Robert Alan King - it is very helpful. Glad to hear that Dr Alexander does believe in God now and it has helped him so much.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 17, 2013

    No wow factor

    Nothing new to me author is methodical in his form like the neurosurgeon he is

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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