BN.com Gift Guide
Customer Reviews for

Psychology of The Simpsons: D'oh!

Average Rating 4
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2006

    Good Read

    Awsome read. Great compilation of essays that expand the mind!

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2012

    D'oh!

    I love the simpsons i love itchy and scrachy buy this book

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2013

    The simpsons

    Just as screwed up as you family only funnier.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2006

    Like Watching an Episode of Itchy and Scratchy

    Perhaps one reason for Creator Matt Groening¿s overwhelming success with the show¿s sixteen seasons is his ability to present relatable human truths and paradigms absurdly and to their exaggerated ends. On the surface a reader¿s first impression might be one of skepticism in the book¿s scientific merits as the subject matter is based on a fictional world. That notion is quickly dismissed in the first essay, ¿The Family Simpson: Like Looking in a Mirror?¿, which focuses on comparing the family for which the series is named with the traditional family structure in America. The true magic of this book is that it never lets the reader down. Just when a particular topic of psychology seems dry, and too over-analyzed, then comes an application from the show that makes sense of it all and leaving the reader wanting to be more of a fan of the show and psychology. Casual viewers of the show will still get a kick out of the material presented but it is the diehard fans who will be the most entertained. Throughout much of the book many of the same episodes and situations are referenced in future essays. For a series with well over three hundred episodes, it is not quite clear whether the editors instructed the essayists to focus on a select few episodes and situations instead of the series as a whole or if it was pure coincidence as some instances throughout the series tend to have more merit in the field of psychology than others. In either case it can be rather annoying but is dealt with more easily each time the situation is referenced to in a different context of psychology. If the Simpsons series is an exaggeration of real life then the application of psychology to it is the medium to bring it back to reality. Or perhaps an alternative view can be considered: whereas psychology applied to the Simpsons is an exaggeration and real life is the only constant. Can it really be concluded without absurdity that Maggie, the Simpsons¿ baby, is ¿at serious risk for conduct problems and alcohol/substance abuse dependence later in life. ¿? The places where this book fails are the same places where psychology fails. Psychology is not a perfect science nor are the Simpsons a perfect family. Somewhere between perfection and complete utter failure lie innumerable human variables to which science cannot predict or control. And although the writers of the series maintain creative control over the characters and their interactions with another, they cannot completely control the viewers¿ perception on the psychological state of their favorite fictional characters by comparing it to their own. What results is an endless game of cat-and-mouse or as the world of ¿The Simpsons¿ would have it, a gory episode of Itchy and Scratchy.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2013

    The simpsons rock

    Boss cover

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1