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Pygmalion

Average Rating 4
( 49 )
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5 Star

(26)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(6)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

Being rich is not everything, but being happy is.

In George Bernard Shaw¿s Pygmalion, the storyline centers around three main characters: Eliza Doolittle, Professor Henry Higgins, and Colonel Pickering. Eliza Doolittle is a flower girl who gives herself to the tutelage of Professor Higgins and Colonel Pickering to le...
In George Bernard Shaw¿s Pygmalion, the storyline centers around three main characters: Eliza Doolittle, Professor Henry Higgins, and Colonel Pickering. Eliza Doolittle is a flower girl who gives herself to the tutelage of Professor Higgins and Colonel Pickering to learn proper grammar and phonetics. Eliza can be characterized as a very sensitive and emotional person she seeks to be treated like a duchess by men. Her personality clashes with the personality of Professor Higgins in an extreme way. Professor Higgins is an arrogant, work-obsessed expert in phonetics who views Eliza simply as an experiment. He is a bachelor who has never found a place for women in his life due to his obsession with language. Colonel Pickering is a gentleman from India who is also an expert in language. He is more genteel than Higgins and treats Eliza with respect while maintaining a professional interest in her similar to that of Higgins. These three comprise the main action of the novel as Eliza learns speech of the upper class from them. She manages to pass herself off as a Hungarian princess at a formal party. This achievement gives credence to the efforts of Higgins and Pickering. After experiencing life in the upper class, Eliza settles for a lower class life with a suitor who loves her for what she is. After petty disputes, Eliza and Higgins remain friends in the time after. Other memorable characters include Mrs. Higgins who maintains an authoritative figure over her grown son and Mr. Doolittle who rises from a dustman to become a well-respected speaker in the community. I think that this is a good book because it shows that happiness can be achieved without wealth and fame. I highly recommend it due to its emphasis on grammatical and phonetic correctness, a dying art in this time period.

posted by Anonymous on March 1, 2007

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

I found Pygmalion to be a charming novel full of wit and feeling

I found Pygmalion to be a charming novel full of wit and feeling. Eliza Doolittle becomes empowered through self-respect, not the love of a man. Though Professor Henry Higgins altered her mannerisms and speech, it was ultimately Eliza’s inner strength that made her a la...
I found Pygmalion to be a charming novel full of wit and feeling. Eliza Doolittle becomes empowered through self-respect, not the love of a man. Though Professor Henry Higgins altered her mannerisms and speech, it was ultimately Eliza’s inner strength that made her a lady. Her realization that before the glamorous dresses and elaborate diction, she was the girl she wished to be inevitably gave her a new sense of independence and self-respect. “Pygmalion” is not merely a play about turning an impoverished flower girl into a duchess, but one about turning a defensive and insecure girl into a confident, strong, and independent woman, through means unforeseen until the very end. It was not the glamorous transformation, but the inner sense of self-worth that changed Eliza for the better. For once the heroine does not fall for the hero, and instead makes her own independent and love-filled ending. All in all, I found George Bernard Shaw's play to be enjoyable and meaningful.

posted by mkomm on January 6, 2014

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2007

    Being rich is not everything, but being happy is.

    In George Bernard Shaw¿s Pygmalion, the storyline centers around three main characters: Eliza Doolittle, Professor Henry Higgins, and Colonel Pickering. Eliza Doolittle is a flower girl who gives herself to the tutelage of Professor Higgins and Colonel Pickering to learn proper grammar and phonetics. Eliza can be characterized as a very sensitive and emotional person she seeks to be treated like a duchess by men. Her personality clashes with the personality of Professor Higgins in an extreme way. Professor Higgins is an arrogant, work-obsessed expert in phonetics who views Eliza simply as an experiment. He is a bachelor who has never found a place for women in his life due to his obsession with language. Colonel Pickering is a gentleman from India who is also an expert in language. He is more genteel than Higgins and treats Eliza with respect while maintaining a professional interest in her similar to that of Higgins. These three comprise the main action of the novel as Eliza learns speech of the upper class from them. She manages to pass herself off as a Hungarian princess at a formal party. This achievement gives credence to the efforts of Higgins and Pickering. After experiencing life in the upper class, Eliza settles for a lower class life with a suitor who loves her for what she is. After petty disputes, Eliza and Higgins remain friends in the time after. Other memorable characters include Mrs. Higgins who maintains an authoritative figure over her grown son and Mr. Doolittle who rises from a dustman to become a well-respected speaker in the community. I think that this is a good book because it shows that happiness can be achieved without wealth and fame. I highly recommend it due to its emphasis on grammatical and phonetic correctness, a dying art in this time period.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 17, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    "Pygmalion is a great classic!!!" - It's message is life-changing!

    Bernard Shaw paints the scenic imagery with genius, and breaks down each character to a science,so that you like you are there in the bookm and know, personally , the characters. The play holds a strong moral, but you must read the book to find out.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2006

    Good read

    I thought Pygmalion was mostly interesting. At the end, when the writing was no longer in play version, it got boring, but before that, it was fun to read. I recommend it to everyone.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2004

    Fun romp through a time we've forgotten

    This is a classic play at its best. Shaw is truly an amazing writer to breath such life into his characters with such gusto, as they seem to jump off the page before your very eyes. The most interesting things about the play are that the ending isn't entirely 'happy', and the play is best when adapted to screen, as when it jumps from scene to scene, time leaps about as well. Wonderful read; recommended to all that posess something of a brain.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2009

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