Customer Reviews for

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking

Average Rating 4.5
( 377 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(238)

4 Star

(80)

3 Star

(29)

2 Star

(18)

1 Star

(12)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

188 out of 191 people found this review helpful.

Fabulous

As an introvert myself, this book drew me in just from the title, and I can truly say this is a fascinating study of what being an introvert means.
With a mixture of anecdotes and scientific research, Cain explores how introverts function, what makes us act the way we ...
As an introvert myself, this book drew me in just from the title, and I can truly say this is a fascinating study of what being an introvert means.
With a mixture of anecdotes and scientific research, Cain explores how introverts function, what makes us act the way we do, and why in this day and age it is such a difficult thing to be respected as someone who is different. Most of us have faced all of the things she mentions, from teachers who think that there is something wrong with children who prefer to read than play, to the minutia like making small talk that can drain some of us of all energy. She does a fantastic job of explaining why we function in this manner, and she manages to show us that we are not wrong in the way we act; we are just different.
The narrative is always interesting, keeping the reader engaged all the way through the book. Although this is a serious research book, it never bores, on the contrary, it is hard to put down. There is a wonderful section on how to take care and nurture an introverted child, which can be a challenge since most of society is geared towards extroverts.
Introverts need different things, and modern life refuses to provide those things, with its constant rewards for those who speak the loudest, whether they have the right answer or not. If you are an introvert, or if you know an introvert, this is a great read. I highly, highly recommend it.

posted by Valca85 on October 20, 2011

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

30 out of 43 people found this review helpful.

Kritters Ramblings

After reading this book, I feel I must say, Yes, I admit I am an extrovert and I like it. I have moments where I need to take a break from it all and hibernate, but in my heart, I love to be out and around people. I am surrounded by introverts on a daily basis and may...
After reading this book, I feel I must say, Yes, I admit I am an extrovert and I like it. I have moments where I need to take a break from it all and hibernate, but in my heart, I love to be out and around people. I am surrounded by introverts on a daily basis and maybe I don't quite understand what makes them tick and what they need on a daily basis.

This book not only shows what introverts need in relationships, but also at the workplace. The final chapter is a complete source for parents and teachers on how to interact with introverted children. I think the author does a great job of making valid points and using interesting research to back up and explain each point. Although this is non-fiction and has a little bit of an academic approach, it reads much easier than a textbook and is a worthy read.

I would recommend this book to both introverts and extroverts. I think the extroverts need to learn how to adapt around introverts, while the introverts need to find the confidence in their own personality traits.

posted by KrittersRamblings on February 4, 2012

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 29 review with 3 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 2
  • Posted February 4, 2012

    Kritters Ramblings

    After reading this book, I feel I must say, Yes, I admit I am an extrovert and I like it. I have moments where I need to take a break from it all and hibernate, but in my heart, I love to be out and around people. I am surrounded by introverts on a daily basis and maybe I don't quite understand what makes them tick and what they need on a daily basis.

    This book not only shows what introverts need in relationships, but also at the workplace. The final chapter is a complete source for parents and teachers on how to interact with introverted children. I think the author does a great job of making valid points and using interesting research to back up and explain each point. Although this is non-fiction and has a little bit of an academic approach, it reads much easier than a textbook and is a worthy read.

    I would recommend this book to both introverts and extroverts. I think the extroverts need to learn how to adapt around introverts, while the introverts need to find the confidence in their own personality traits.

    30 out of 43 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2012

    A great insight

    The world of introverts is expressed in words and studies done by a person with the desire to show the differences between the two. Its quite a great read, in that it clarifies people in their natural response to the outside world. I enjoyed reading it=)

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2014

    As an introvert, it's nice to see someone take a serious look at

    As an introvert, it's nice to see someone take a serious look at how society underestimates quiet originality. When I was a child, I was a bookworm, that my parents would sometimes make a rule that I had to spend time each day playing with other children. It would have been nice to have a book like this as a resource back then.
    Cain describes how introverts differ psychologically and neurologically from extroverts. The science can get a little dense at times, but the author does a good job of getting to the meat of the studies and drawing out the practical implications for individuals and for society as a whole. She discusses how educators go wrong by placing too much emphasis on group learning as opposed to individual investigation, and how employers can benefit from understanding and accommodating their more introverted employees.








    Intriguing and well worth reading, with insights illustrated from Susan Cain's own life and experience. "Quiet" is an easy read and perhaps light on the research, but this introvert did find himself nodding through the book: "Yes, I'm just like that." A practical book as well; Cain gives pointers for introverts (and the extroverts who love them) in personal and professional relationships.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2013

    TV

    Thia ads to shadow and purrs. She rubs herself against her legs. Hi! She purred sweetly. Violet rested on a blanket

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2013

    Interesting

    Learned a lot about myself

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2013

    Liked it a lot

    My only complaint is that the examples were from the extreme end of introversion that I often found myself wondering if I misidentified myself!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 6, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Shh! Quiet is just okay I know I¿m a few months late, but I fin

    Shh! Quiet is just okay

    I know I’m a few months late, but I finally jumped on the Quiet (by Susan Cain) train. I had to wait for it to become available through the library, but that’s okay because it was mostly worth the wait. Not that I enjoy waiting, though, because I fall on the extrovert side of the spectrum. But, I also take a lot of things personally, so technically I think I’m a sensitive extrovert (I am also reward and threat sensitive). Whatever I am, I went into this thinking I’d learn a lot about how to understand my introverted husband, but instead I just read more of the same things I already knew.




    I did have a lot of ‘aha’ moments during this book. It wasn’t that the information was new, necessarily, but that it was put forth in such a way that it made sense. Such as open office plans being distracting and bad for memory or that it’s better to study alone than in groups. These things make sense but I never gave them much thought.




    As a book nerd, I loved the section about ‘flow’ (pursuing something for its own sake). For me, reading gives me flow. I do it for me, not because I gain outside rewards from it. I do it simply because I want to and I enjoy it. Granted, one could argue that liking something is a reward in itself, but that is a philosophical discussion that I am choosing not to go into right now (but it’s along the lines of whether or not someone can be truly altruistic).




    My only problem with this book is that the author used the word ‘gregarious’ on almost every other page. You know how when you say something over and over again it sounds weird and loses meaning? That’s what happened with ‘gregarious’ – I just started skipping sentences with that word in it because it held no meaning anymore.




    All in all, I wasn’t dazzled by this book like many people seemed to be, but I enjoyed it. It was interesting, informative, and gave me some food for thought. I’m glad I read it, but I don’t know that my life is much different.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2013

    Great Read!

    Elaine Aaron's Highly Sensitive People introduced me to the possibility that sensitivity & introversion could be good things. Susan Cain's Quiet continues the conversation. Susan Cain's book (which is endorsed by Elaine Aaron) is an easy read to help introduce the "person on the street" to some of the concepts of HSP.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 15, 2013

    QUIET By Susan Cain The following is taken from the books d

    QUIET

    By Susan Cain



    The following is taken from the books description on web site

    “At least one-third of the people we know are introverts. They are the ones who prefer listening to speaking, reading to partying; who innovate and create but dislike self-promotion; who favor working on their own over brainstorming in teams. Although they are often labeled "quiet," it is to introverts that we owe many of the great contributions to society--from van Gogh’s sunflowers to the invention of the personal computer.
    Passionately argued, impressively researched, and filled with indelible stories of real people, Quiet shows how dramatically we undervalue introverts, and how much we lose in doing so. Taking the reader on a journey from Dale Carnegie’s birthplace to Harvard Business School, from a Tony Robbins seminar to an evangelical megachurch, Susan Cain charts the rise of the Extrovert Ideal in the twentieth century and explores its far-reaching effects. She talks to Asian-American students who feel alienated from the brash, backslapping atmosphere of American schools. She questions the dominant values of American business culture, where forced collaboration can stand in the way of innovation, and where the leadership potential of introverts is often overlooked. And she draws on cutting-edge research in psychology and neuroscience to reveal the surprising differences between extroverts and introverts.
    Perhaps most inspiring, she introduces us to successful introverts--from a witty, high octane public speaker who recharges in solitude after his talks, to a record-breaking salesman who quietly taps into the power of questions. Finally, she offers invaluable advice on everything from how to better negotiate differences in introvert-extrovert relationships to how to empower an introverted child to when it makes sense to be a "pretend extrovert. “This extraordinary book has the power to permanently change how we see introverts and, equally important, how introverts see themselves.”
    I was thinking, for some odd reason, that this book would be different somehow….I live a very quiet life…When I am with others I am an extrovert…unless I feel uncomfortable.


    I had a hard time reading this book, first of all the print is small and there was way too many, what I call, on and on, pages. Maybe I just didn’t get it, I do not know but, I did not really like this book….I had to force myself to read as much as I could before writing a review but, it was difficult for me. Maybe it is because I do live a quiet life is the reason I did not get it…

    I can see many others might get it and this could help them to slow down and smell the roses.

    We are all different and live different life styles…I would recommend this book to those who are in need a quiet and to learn how you can be used in your quiet life or lack of.

    Quiet Time with GOD is the most important Quiet we can use…

    I pray Susan that those who need your book will bless them in a wonderful way. Gods Peace and Love to you always. In Jesus Name Amen





    "I received this book for free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group for this review."

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 17, 2012

    Insightful

    Solid read, the topic of several dinner time conversations around our house.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 6, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 29, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 29 review with 3 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 2