Customer Reviews for

Rabbit, Run

Average Rating 3.5
( 57 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(18)

4 Star

(17)

3 Star

(10)

2 Star

(6)

1 Star

(6)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

Rabbit, Run: Review

Have you ever seen a waitress drop an entire tray of ready-to-eat meals ¿ cheeks glowing a vibrant rosy hue ¿ and ended up smiling in spite of yourself? Most people seem to take pleasure in hearing of other¿s misfortunes and sorrows¿an emotion that is best described in...
Have you ever seen a waitress drop an entire tray of ready-to-eat meals ¿ cheeks glowing a vibrant rosy hue ¿ and ended up smiling in spite of yourself? Most people seem to take pleasure in hearing of other¿s misfortunes and sorrows¿an emotion that is best described in the German language as schadenfreude: laughing at the misfortune of others. Rabbit, Run by John Updike not only captures that very principle, but contorts it in a way nearly unprecedented by other literary works. Readers experience the pain of the foremost character, Rabbit Angstrom, with such severity that the book will be a difficult one to put down while unknowingly being coaxed over by the language Updike so masterfully wields. Critics claim that the novel contains flawlessly executed plot advancements alongside intricate wording that flows with such elegance. This beautiful composition of words and images accents the already florescent plot with perfect mental pictures and matchless emotions within each character. Even the simplest of tasks is fascinating enough to provoke thought. ¿With raw sudsy hands Mrs. Angstrom has set about heating coffee for her husband. This small act of service seems to bring her into harmony with him they begin, in the sudden way of old couples apparently at odds, to speak as one¿ (Updike 140). The overall concept of trying to find oneself is so thought-provoking that the novel may take twice the time to read wandering minds cannot seem to take the focus from their own ironically paralleled lives. Rabbit is a character running from life, an action that many people contemplate, but succumb to doing so in a strictly representational manner. He is in a constant search for nothing in particular, and this is what is so drawing about his story. Even though you¿ll find out how pessimistic he is, disliking Rabbit becomes a chore in harmony with Updike¿s in-depth descriptions of his thoughts. Updike¿s novel of forever seeking the unknown is an indescribable story that needs to be experienced to be understood. Through studying his writing style and analyzing the basic plot, Rabbit, Run illustrates Updike¿s own search of the unidentified. However, the true understanding comes from within oneself as they experience this critically acclaimed author¿s tale of hopeful searching. Deep, emotion-filled descriptions of internal trauma turn this everyday tale of longing for true satisfaction into the must-read novel that it stands as now. While I highly doubt you¿ll laugh at Rabbit¿s misfortunes, you are guaranteed to be amused.

posted by Anonymous on February 21, 2006

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Most Helpful Critical Review

4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

Running From 'Rabbit, Run'

While John Updike is a very good author and I like many of his works, I did not enjoy 'Rabbit Run'. The plot is overly drawn out and the characters are static. Harry 'Rabbit' Angstrom, the protagonist, can not overcome is selfishness and runs from every situation that...
While John Updike is a very good author and I like many of his works, I did not enjoy 'Rabbit Run'. The plot is overly drawn out and the characters are static. Harry 'Rabbit' Angstrom, the protagonist, can not overcome is selfishness and runs from every situation that is not beneficial to his postion in life. The secondary characters also do not contribute to moving the plot forward and tend to complicate the plot further

posted by Anonymous on September 4, 2003

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2006

    Rabbit, Run: Review

    Have you ever seen a waitress drop an entire tray of ready-to-eat meals ¿ cheeks glowing a vibrant rosy hue ¿ and ended up smiling in spite of yourself? Most people seem to take pleasure in hearing of other¿s misfortunes and sorrows¿an emotion that is best described in the German language as schadenfreude: laughing at the misfortune of others. Rabbit, Run by John Updike not only captures that very principle, but contorts it in a way nearly unprecedented by other literary works. Readers experience the pain of the foremost character, Rabbit Angstrom, with such severity that the book will be a difficult one to put down while unknowingly being coaxed over by the language Updike so masterfully wields. Critics claim that the novel contains flawlessly executed plot advancements alongside intricate wording that flows with such elegance. This beautiful composition of words and images accents the already florescent plot with perfect mental pictures and matchless emotions within each character. Even the simplest of tasks is fascinating enough to provoke thought. ¿With raw sudsy hands Mrs. Angstrom has set about heating coffee for her husband. This small act of service seems to bring her into harmony with him they begin, in the sudden way of old couples apparently at odds, to speak as one¿ (Updike 140). The overall concept of trying to find oneself is so thought-provoking that the novel may take twice the time to read wandering minds cannot seem to take the focus from their own ironically paralleled lives. Rabbit is a character running from life, an action that many people contemplate, but succumb to doing so in a strictly representational manner. He is in a constant search for nothing in particular, and this is what is so drawing about his story. Even though you¿ll find out how pessimistic he is, disliking Rabbit becomes a chore in harmony with Updike¿s in-depth descriptions of his thoughts. Updike¿s novel of forever seeking the unknown is an indescribable story that needs to be experienced to be understood. Through studying his writing style and analyzing the basic plot, Rabbit, Run illustrates Updike¿s own search of the unidentified. However, the true understanding comes from within oneself as they experience this critically acclaimed author¿s tale of hopeful searching. Deep, emotion-filled descriptions of internal trauma turn this everyday tale of longing for true satisfaction into the must-read novel that it stands as now. While I highly doubt you¿ll laugh at Rabbit¿s misfortunes, you are guaranteed to be amused.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2004

    Boring book pretty writing

    While the writing of this book is aesthetically beautiful, the plot left a lot to be desired. I fell asleep about eight times while I was reading this book, and it wasn't like I was reading late at night. It was in the middle of the day.

    4 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2003

    Running From 'Rabbit, Run'

    While John Updike is a very good author and I like many of his works, I did not enjoy 'Rabbit Run'. The plot is overly drawn out and the characters are static. Harry 'Rabbit' Angstrom, the protagonist, can not overcome is selfishness and runs from every situation that is not beneficial to his postion in life. The secondary characters also do not contribute to moving the plot forward and tend to complicate the plot further

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2003

    Rabbit on the Run

    Harry "Rabbit" Angstrom was the star of his basketball team. He had everything for him back then. Now, he is married to a woman who does nothing but sit on her couch and smoke cigarettes while she is pregnant. Harry is sick and tired of coming home to his unsatisfied home life. He decides to leave his wife and his son, Nelson. So, he hops into his car and starts to drive out of town. He keeps driving and driving until he meets up with his old basketball coach, Tothero. Tothero introduces him to Ruth. Rabbit finds Ruth to be attractive and not long after, Rabbit becomes her roommate. Rabbit finds that he is most happiest with Ruth. This all has to change when his wife goes into labor with his daughter. After he sees his new daughter, his son, and his wife, he decides that he should stay with his family. Things were going good at home with the new baby, until he realizes that his home life will always be unsatisfactory. What does he do about this? You guessed right, he leaves. A tragedy happens which will bring him back to his family, but Rabbit runs away, again. This time Rabbit is reunited Ruth. Should he stay with Ruth or should he go back to his wife? Rabbit, Run was a not too good book and not too bad book. I felt that this book was not as exciting. It did not have very many interesting parts.Most parts of the book I had to read quick through because it just was, well boring. I do have to say that I liked the way the author threw in some tragedy. Not a lot of authors like to add tragedies, but Updike was not afraid. I could feel the way Rabbit felt during this whole tragedy. Updike did a good job in writing that part in such a melancholy way. I also liked the way Updike ended the book. Updike ended the book with Rabbit doing what he does best, running away from his problems.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 31, 2002

    Rabbit needs to grow up,not multiply

    Our book club read this book recently. I had hoped Updike would be a real treat, but this was one boring book. Not one character with whom you could identify. If an entire town was this dysfunctional, it would fade away. Don't think I want to read the other Updike books of the "rabbit" series. Not recommended for new mothers.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 11, 2013

    Updike is a tricky sonofagun. I put this book down twice because

    Updike is a tricky sonofagun.
    I put this book down twice because I couldn't hate anyone more than Rabbit (this is uncommon, for I can usually overlook my hate in favor of good prose).  In my third try, I forced myself to continue on and I'm quite glad I did. At the beginning Rabbit is the most detestable creature you've ever seen. At the end you, or at least I, weep with tears of agony and love for these characters.  Updike knew what he was doing all along. One might even feel a bit outsmarted by him.  
    Truly, read this book. The prose alone is worth it, but if you have patience, you will experience a beautiful, haunting story of love and life. I cannot wait to get started with Redux.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2013

    Brackenstar

    Nods to her and jumps up as a robin flew overhead.he caught it in his jaws an paded back

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 12, 2011

    Rabbit, run must be...

    John Updike's "Rabbit, run" must be read with consideration to, and the context of Sinclair Lewis' "Babbit". Rabbit, Babbit -- too obvious, yes?

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2003

    Rabbit, stay...

    Updike is so skillful in making us love and hate every single character in the book - you see two sides to everyone, and yet don't realize it until later when you're trying to assess who is right and who is wrong, who is better... Life is hard, and at times running seems to be the best alternative. For Rabbit, there seemed no way of escaping the suburban way of life. At times it seems selfish, but you'd feel suffocated if you didn't try going for something better, too. Initially, you sympathize with Rabbit, because you feel as suffocated as he does...and then you realize that everyone is being suffocated by one thing or another, or in most cases by someone. You feel like taking that ride and seeing where it will lead you, like Harry does in the beginning. You just want to feel a bit of freedom. I think the book is great, and can't wait to read the rest in the series. 'Rabbit, Run' is truly the great American novel.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 11, 2002

    run rabbit run!

    In the book, Rabbit Run, Harry Angstrom runs away from his home. He runs away from an alcoholic wife, a simple job in the sales world, a young boy, and his soon to be daughter. Rabbit (Harry) is searching for his childhood life; he wants to go back to the days when he was the high school jock, and the star of the basketball team. Thinking that finding his old basketball coach will help him, he goes in search of Mr. Tothero. Tothero introduces him to a couple of friends, Margaret and Ruth, and by the end of the night Rabbit and Ruth become roommates. Rabbit seems to be happy until his wife, Janice, goes into labor and forces rabbit to leave Ruth and rush to the hospital. Throughout the rest of the book, Rabbit fights with the desire to return to Ruth, and the obligation he feels he has to Janice and their two children. The novel ends in such a dramatic way that you can¿t wait to begin reading the second book in the series. John Updike did a terrific job in creating the realistic fictional novel. The novel was easy to read, and just interesting enough to keep you into it. Updike uses simple vocabulary and his sentence structure is easy to follow. At some points the plot and descriptions John Updike chose were weak and a little dry, but overall the book was enjoyable. Hooray for Updike!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 11, 2002

    Rabbit, Run

    In John Updike¿s Rabbit, Run he reveals the stunning reality that is life. What happens to us during our high school years does not determine the rest of our lives. Harry Angstrom, the main character of the novel, was one of the best basketball players his school had ever seen. He was the popular kid in school everyone loved, and everything seemed so clear. Now he has run away from his wife and the fog has begun to set in. He begins to live his life with no responsibility for any of his actions. Updike does a wonderful job of painting the picture of Harry¿s life. He captures what a real dysfunctional family looks like. With the use of an extensive vocabulary Updike captivates every last detail in a scene. He describes every character¿s emotions and reactions to one another and he causes us to begin to have our own emotions and reactions towards the characters. Harry¿s life is not a happy or a sad one because there are so many different viewpoints to look from. He may seem happy now, but what happens when he gets bored with where he is? This book is a good to read, although it would be best if read by an experienced reader.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2001

    Irresponsible Rabbit

    Harry 'Rabbit' leaves his alcoholic pregnant wife, Janice and their child. I liked the book. It was very well written. I found that Updike kept the story moving making you want to see what would happen next. It's very true to real life, which is a scary thought! I can relate to the story easily. I thought both Rabbit and Janice were both very childish, irresponsible people which causes a horrible tragedy. It would have been nice if Rabbit or Janice learned something from their mistakes. Rabbit as a nickname for Harry is a good play on words.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2013

    :(

    I want more, MORE!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2013

    XY

    Ooh

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2013

    Definetly like it, but...

    Get to the fuc<_>king please!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2013

    I love it

    BUT PLEASE GET TO THE S.EX ITS DRIVING ME CRAZY

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2013

    Daisy - Chapter Two

    Daisy had never seen such a....handsome rabbit. She had no experience with neither male or female, because she really had never had any contact with her own kind. And this was the first rabbit she had ever met who lived inside with his owner. "How come he calls you a he?" 'Chevs' asked her. "They had a little mishap back at the....um....what is it called...." she stuttered. "Shelter," he put in. She nodded gratefully. Chevs smiled.
    <p>

    "Let me show you around." He said in a kind but still masculine voice.
    <p>
    She nodded again stupidly. She could not get her eyes off him. He began by showing her around. His pen, as he called it, was his home. Wow! She thought but kept her mouth shut. She let him show her his toys, his food containers, everything. "This is my favorite squeaky ball." He was saying.
    <p>

    She was looking at his chest absently. Was that all muscle, or just fur? She imagined it against her back and shoulders and how it might feel. Ohhh....
    <p>

    "Hey. Eyes up here!" He said. "Whats wrong?" "Nothin .'" She managed, but still she looked at his body for a second more. She could not imagine actually living in a pen with him. Yes, she was really, really impressed with all his human gave him and his pen and such....but he? He was so impressing it made her mouth water.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2013

    Spirit

    Hare res.2

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2012

    L

    Y ty

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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