Customer Reviews for

Rational Recovery: The New Cure for Substance Addiction

Average Rating 4
( 12 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Excellent plan for life-long abstinence

Through chapter after chapter, Jack Trimpey reinforces his views on the reliability of oneself to overcome their addiction by recognition of the difference between rational thought and irrational suggestion. Although many may not agree with the imagery of having to grap...
Through chapter after chapter, Jack Trimpey reinforces his views on the reliability of oneself to overcome their addiction by recognition of the difference between rational thought and irrational suggestion. Although many may not agree with the imagery of having to grapple and overcome the power of their "beast", or addictive voice, the premise that is simply implied is that everyone has the power and liberty to stop drinking/using through the awareness of their addictive behavior. This is not a moderation plan, but a plan of life-long abstinence. what makes Jack's plan of attack so different from AA or other recovery groups is that he believes that addiction is something that can be "cured" without fanfare, and without a whole lot of maintenance. All the while, he firmly believes that once an addiction has ended, it serves no purpose to view it in the present tense.
Mr. Trimpey has included many tools to end addiction through his Addictive Voice Recognition Technique, and gives several scenarios for individual need and preference. His AVRT is simple, easy to understand and practice, and very logical. Taking responsible for an addict's behavior, good or bad, is up to the addict.
He believes, like AA, that life-long abstinence is the only course to take in order for AVRT to succeed. It may be that the AVRT is mapped for total abstinence, and maybe a reflection of the author's opinions on the consumption of alcohol and/or drugs. So if life-long abstinence is your plan, i would recommend this book and Rational Recovery methods over all others. However, if moderation is your goal, Stanton Peele's "7 Tools To Beat Addiction" is a similar take, but much more liberal and broad-based, to cover several different kinds of addiction, i.e., tobacco, sex, eating, etc., without including imagery that is as animated as AVRT.

posted by 3077762 on February 26, 2010

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

good if you don't like AA, and want to never drink

This book would be good if you don't want to go to AA, but still want to give up alcohol forever. The AVRT, as described at the beginning of the book, also is good. However, if you are less than a really bad alcoholic, and want to reduce or moderate your driking, this b...
This book would be good if you don't want to go to AA, but still want to give up alcohol forever. The AVRT, as described at the beginning of the book, also is good. However, if you are less than a really bad alcoholic, and want to reduce or moderate your driking, this book is not for you. The book, while the author seems to loathe and hate AA, accepts a lot of the basic premises of AA, such as, "one drink, one drunk", "the beast", etc. Either you are an alcholic, or not, the author seems to think. No gradations, no steps, no middle way. His way or the highway. Fine, but if you are not a terrible alcoholic, this book is just too dogmatic. In Europe, Canada, and other areas, they don't just have one type of alcoholic - the worst. In the U.S., probably due to our religious history, we view alcoholism as, not a problem to deal with, but a battle for the soul. The result is these abstinance-based programs like AA and Rational Recovery ("one drink, one drunk"). In Europe and Canada, they recognize that every person is unique, and the problem can be moderated. I found Stanton Peele's book "The Truth About Addiction and Recovery" much better than this book. But as I said, if you are a terrible alcoholic, and never want to ever drink again, without AA, this book would be for you. If you just want to moderate, try Peele.

posted by Anonymous on February 5, 2003

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Excellent plan for life-long abstinence

    Through chapter after chapter, Jack Trimpey reinforces his views on the reliability of oneself to overcome their addiction by recognition of the difference between rational thought and irrational suggestion. Although many may not agree with the imagery of having to grapple and overcome the power of their "beast", or addictive voice, the premise that is simply implied is that everyone has the power and liberty to stop drinking/using through the awareness of their addictive behavior. This is not a moderation plan, but a plan of life-long abstinence. what makes Jack's plan of attack so different from AA or other recovery groups is that he believes that addiction is something that can be "cured" without fanfare, and without a whole lot of maintenance. All the while, he firmly believes that once an addiction has ended, it serves no purpose to view it in the present tense.
    Mr. Trimpey has included many tools to end addiction through his Addictive Voice Recognition Technique, and gives several scenarios for individual need and preference. His AVRT is simple, easy to understand and practice, and very logical. Taking responsible for an addict's behavior, good or bad, is up to the addict.
    He believes, like AA, that life-long abstinence is the only course to take in order for AVRT to succeed. It may be that the AVRT is mapped for total abstinence, and maybe a reflection of the author's opinions on the consumption of alcohol and/or drugs. So if life-long abstinence is your plan, i would recommend this book and Rational Recovery methods over all others. However, if moderation is your goal, Stanton Peele's "7 Tools To Beat Addiction" is a similar take, but much more liberal and broad-based, to cover several different kinds of addiction, i.e., tobacco, sex, eating, etc., without including imagery that is as animated as AVRT.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2007

    This is how addictions really work

    I had an addiction for fourteen years, and for a long time I went to psychologists, and to leaders in my church, and read several books, and no one knew anything about why addictions happen or how to overcome them. Then I found this book, and it explains it all perfectly and now I am totally recovered and am free of addiction.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2004

    Finally!

    Boy, are you in for a treat! Finally, finally someone has taken the mystery out of addiction and provided a simple, private and insight-based way to recover from any addiction, right now. The methods described in Mr. Trimpey's work vanqish any feelings of being out-of-control instantly. The technique, garnered from self-recovered people who permanently quit their addiction on their own works beautifully. So, stay who you are, be confidently abstinent and get on with life using the simple tools of 'Addictive Voice Recognition Technique.' Instead of going to meetings that bore you, rotating back to rehabs and expecting relapse you can quickly learn to 'recognize' your addictive voice and separate the mindset of addiction from abstinence. Written at about a grade 6 level 'Rational Recovery' is easy to understand. Thanks to Mr. Trimpey, the game is quickly over and life returns to normal. Mr. Trimpey has done all a great service. You can't miss with this book. Excellent!!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2004

    NO MORE AA MEETINGS

    this is a great book, don't miss out on this one

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2003

    This is great not having to go back to AA rooms

    I took Jack Trimpey¿s Class, it was Great. I didn¿t like calling myself an Alcoholic. After I got back from rehab in 1984. My husband said to me, there is going to be a day when you won¿t have to say, you¿re an Alcoholic. You will just say you just don¿t drink. I was very upset. I said all the things I was taught in AA, that I was going to be an Alcoholic the rest of my life. Bla bla bla,,, After I learned what Rational Recovery is I can say. I am a normal person who DOES NOT DRINK. Thank you Jack Trimpey for giving me a great life. From Nyna Fleury in Ketchikan Alaska

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2003

    good if you don't like AA, and want to never drink

    This book would be good if you don't want to go to AA, but still want to give up alcohol forever. The AVRT, as described at the beginning of the book, also is good. However, if you are less than a really bad alcoholic, and want to reduce or moderate your driking, this book is not for you. The book, while the author seems to loathe and hate AA, accepts a lot of the basic premises of AA, such as, "one drink, one drunk", "the beast", etc. Either you are an alcholic, or not, the author seems to think. No gradations, no steps, no middle way. His way or the highway. Fine, but if you are not a terrible alcoholic, this book is just too dogmatic. In Europe, Canada, and other areas, they don't just have one type of alcoholic - the worst. In the U.S., probably due to our religious history, we view alcoholism as, not a problem to deal with, but a battle for the soul. The result is these abstinance-based programs like AA and Rational Recovery ("one drink, one drunk"). In Europe and Canada, they recognize that every person is unique, and the problem can be moderated. I found Stanton Peele's book "The Truth About Addiction and Recovery" much better than this book. But as I said, if you are a terrible alcoholic, and never want to ever drink again, without AA, this book would be for you. If you just want to moderate, try Peele.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2004

    Art,Truth and Beauty(and a bit of Manure to deal with)

    Dear Jack Trimpey, The reason that your 'Method' works so well is that it is so simple and can be applied to any form of negative thinking/being. You have helped me to change my world and I will always be eternally grateful.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 24, 2013

    I read this book 15 years ago. After 20 years of heavy drinking

    I read this book 15 years ago. After 20 years of heavy drinking and many failed attempts to quit,
    the guidance in this book finally did the trick. I have not had a drink in 15 years nor a desire to have a drink.
    Quiting drinking is the best gift I have ever given myself. I like myself again. Now my dear sister is in need
     of some help. I am buying this book for her. I hope this book will help her and you because being sober is
     so much more enjoyable than being drunk. Good luck

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 7, 2012

    It works

    Sober more than 12 years. Better life. Never looked back.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 10, 2012

    I read this book because someone close to me has been using drug

    I read this book because someone close to me has been using drugs and I was looking for insights. This book was not written for people like me.

    The author's basic point is that all addictions – cigarettes, gambling, overeating, alcohol, cocaine, biting your fingernails – are essentially the same, and that once you see that they do you more harm than good and have worked up the resolve, you will decide to kick the habit. No treatment or assistance needed. There's a little bit more; he talks about how to work up the resolve, and about the “Addictive Voice,” that part of us that says “go ahead, indulge yourself”, and how to resist it.

    The author has an axe to grind with 12 Step programs, rehab treatment, and everything related to them, and devotes a lot of time expressing his criticisms.

    He makes some good points. There are people who have successfully kicked, on their own, pretty much every kind of addiction and habit. I agree with a lot of his criticisms of 12 Step programs and standard addiction treatment. But he does not acknowledge that many people see their addictions not as the source of their problems but as the only thing that helps them cope with their problems. There is nothing in this book for people who are losing their health, personal relationships, careers, and self-respect but are still compelled to get another fix. He fails to acknowledge the people for whom a 12 Step program worked when nothing else did, or that Alcoholics Anonymous was founded as an alternative to the “you could quit if you really wanted to” approach. There is nothing in this book for people who are watching someone they care about destroy himself with an addiction and want an alternative to either being an enabler or throwing the addict out.

    This book presents an alternative point of view, and that is good. Just be aware that the point of view it presents is pretty limited.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2007

    A reviewer

    but philosphy does not a recovery make. Rather than trying to make your recovery easy and to keep on doing things to hurt yourself and those you love, if you are struggling with addiction, address it. This book is to discuss, think about, avoid it.

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
Page 1 of 1