Customer Reviews for

The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism

Average Rating 4
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

10 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

Lucid and Convincing

The casual glance of the front cover may lead one to conclude that this must be a plain, and perhaps boring, volume laden with old, long theological words. This couldn't be farther from the truth. This is one of the most well written piece of popular apologetic I have...
The casual glance of the front cover may lead one to conclude that this must be a plain, and perhaps boring, volume laden with old, long theological words. This couldn't be farther from the truth. This is one of the most well written piece of popular apologetic I have read, and it successfully addresses the most modern issues that plague the minds of those in the post-modern societies. What I really appreciate about Pastor Keller's writing is that he effectively brings together vast array of knowledge from various different fields of knowledge, from science to philosophy to literature, to support his claims. For instance, in one of the chapters, he was referencing a story written by Flannery O'Conner, not only providing a deep analysis (which I was able to reference later on to help a friend who was reading the story), but also using it to a great effect to support his argument.

This book provides great answers to many of common objections to Christian faith, and I highly recommend to the seekers as well as those would like to learn to be able to defend their faith.

posted by hyunlee on March 17, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

A Nice Try, but...

...ultimately not what I hoped for. I was wanting a fresh, validating, positive response to Dawkins/Harris et al (the angry atheists) while also not swinging too far in the literalist direction. I was hoping for the sweet spot, and instead got a bit of the slightly stal...
...ultimately not what I hoped for. I was wanting a fresh, validating, positive response to Dawkins/Harris et al (the angry atheists) while also not swinging too far in the literalist direction. I was hoping for the sweet spot, and instead got a bit of the slightly stale warmed-over C. S. Lewis. I like Lewis, but I wanted something fresh...and non-circular, logically. If you are looking for that middle path between militant atheism and the intellectual straight-jacket of Christian literalism, I would recommend Marcus Borg's The Heart of Christianity, rather than Timothy Keller's pretty good effort. He ultimately veers toward a literalistic view of Christianity which is intellectually unfulfilling for many.

posted by Anonymous on March 27, 2008

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  • Posted May 31, 2012

    HIghly recommended.

    Answers a lot of questions concerning belief.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2008

    No reason, No God, No logic

    I am a yet-to-be-believer who likes to read books about the validity of Christianity, proGod books if you will, I also read books that are proatheist. That being said this book was not very helpful at all. I found Part one of the book to be...how can I say this, but a complete waste of time. He makes so many presumptuous assumptions, but states them as absolute facts. He talks about love, like their is an absolute definition of the word. His whole piano player metaphor about how doing something, anything, enslaves you!!! What pish-posh. Obviously if you do something it restricts you from doing something else, but if you are doing something you like, you love, are you being enslaved??? Almost everything he presents as absolutes, I see handfuls of counter arguments. 'Only a Sith deals in absolutes'--Obi-Wan, and to this Keller would obviously refute that Obi-Wan's statement is an absolute. Duh. All of Part One is constructed on a elementary school style argument, which is: 'I know I am but so are you.' He encourages people to be open-minded, which is great advice, but there is not much value in that for people who are already open-minded. If you are an atheist who reads book about religion and god, in hopes to find them, then this is not the book for you. Obviously if you are an atheist reading about god, then you are already open to new ideas. Part two of the book is ok, but nothing I did not read in Mere Christianity. If you are trying to find God, more specifically Jesus, then I recommend the afore mentioned Mere Christianity and The Case for Christ, two very good books and two very different styles of presentation. I recommend this book to people who are Christians who think they are 'good' people, who think their doo-doo don't stink. And to atheists who think that Christians and other god believing persons are idiots, this book is a good start, but my recommendation is to read Case for Christ first. Keller does sort of counter some of Dawkins 'The God Delusion' arguments, but I would put The God Delusion on top of this book. I'd give Delusion say 3 and a half stars.

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2008

    A Nice Try, but...

    ...ultimately not what I hoped for. I was wanting a fresh, validating, positive response to Dawkins/Harris et al (the angry atheists) while also not swinging too far in the literalist direction. I was hoping for the sweet spot, and instead got a bit of the slightly stale warmed-over C. S. Lewis. I like Lewis, but I wanted something fresh...and non-circular, logically. If you are looking for that middle path between militant atheism and the intellectual straight-jacket of Christian literalism, I would recommend Marcus Borg's The Heart of Christianity, rather than Timothy Keller's pretty good effort. He ultimately veers toward a literalistic view of Christianity which is intellectually unfulfilling for many.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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    Posted June 7, 2011

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    Posted February 26, 2011

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    Posted January 25, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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