Customer Reviews for

The Red Badge of Courage and Selected Short Fiction (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

Average Rating 3.5
( 114 )
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5 Star

(36)

4 Star

(31)

3 Star

(29)

2 Star

(12)

1 Star

(6)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 115 Customer Reviews
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  • Posted May 15, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    The Red Badge of Courage

    I decided to start reading in my leisure at the early age of 50. Classics were the best bet, since I did not want to waste time. This book is very good because it described the fear of dying and not know if running in the face of battle was going to be the end of your life. Fear was highly described in the heat of the battle.

    This is a great book and I am glad I read it since I currently have a son in the armed forces.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2007

    Outstanding

    The ¿Red Badge of Courage¿ written by Stephen Crane in 1895, is about a boy and his two-day journey into manhood. The story begins with our main character debating whether or not he will have enough courage to fight or if he will flee. This idea of courage is a common theme throughout the book. When the youth(as Crane often refers to him) is engaged in his first battle, he finds that his self and his fellow soldiers are so closely positioned that he couldn¿t run if he wanted to. Therefore, he continues to fight almost as if he were a single gear inside an immense clock. Though successful in his first battle Henry flees from the second cursing his cowardice. After that, he witnesses his friend dying and begins to fight with a new sense of valor there after. A wonderfully built cast of characters is more often than not an indicator of a fantastic book, and Stephen Crane is no exception to this trend. From the beginning, Henry was portrayed as a naïve boy with only the desire to build a reputation for himself. Before long, the author delves deep within his mind to see both sides of every argument he has and more than anything shows his development into a man. He starts as a boy wishing to become a hero of war but at the same time not wanting to go through the process of achieving that. Within only a day his selfishness seems to melt away as he begins to fight with a disregard to what his comrades will think of him and rather just to fight. This is a huge change in character and undoubtedly puts him into the category of man. The same is true for Wilson, our main characters friend on the field. Stephen introduced Wilson as the loud soldier. As his rise in maturity level becomes apparent so does the lowering in noise he produces. These two ideas seem to compliment each other as they make for a seemingly ¿complicated¿ character development. The point of view comes from that of a Union soldier in this book. The point of view is arguably one of the best elements in this book for the very reason that it is so real. Many other war novels will depict the main character as an indestructible fighting machine, but this book even has its main character doubting his own courage and willfulness to go into battle. It becomes the only reason people are still able to relate to this book so much even a hundred years after the lives of the target audience. The point of view in this book seems to become your own. The ideas and beliefs are so real that one begins to wonder if Stephen Crane had gone through a similar development. Overall, I would say this book was a very enjoyable read and I would recommend it to anyone. It might require a little more patience than that needed for a more modern book because of the differences in style, like how an author would introduce an idea or theme. Some might introduce things very slowly while others would introduce it as bluntly as possible. Still, I give this book a five out of five.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2003

    One of the great war books

    As someone who has never actually been in combat I cannot confirm what many say about 'The Red Badge of Courage' i.e. that it presents one of the most true pictures of what that experience is. I can however say that the whole story of Henry Fleming's initial great dreams of heroism, his terrible surprise at the revelation of his own cowardice in battle, and his redemptive return to the field of battle is one which rings true. There is something very clear, pure and American in the writing of Crane. And this work has a quiet power and authenticity. An American classic.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2014

    Crane's Red badge of Courage Still Resonates Today

    Crane's classic descriptions of the battlefield's sights and sounds paint a lasting picture of the Civil War battlefields. His words resonate today whether you talk of Iraq or Afghanistan. Although geographically different, the thick smoke, smell of decomposing bodies, and the bloodbath's of battle are still the same. The fear is palpable as he describes the valiant soldiers and their reaction to battle. He really makes the reader understand the psychological turmoil that war brings as well as the camaraderie that develops among soldiers in the heat of the battle. The symbolism in the Red badge of Courage would make this a great choice for a classic book club discussion.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2013

    The awesome badge of corage

    This is my all time favorite book. I would rather read this book than watch the cooking channle. I would enCORAGE young readers to read this book. I always go into a diffrent world when i read a good book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2013

    Very good.

    It really captures the horrors of war.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2011

    Not bad

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 10, 2009

    Vivid stories, worthy of acknowledgment.

    Some of the written text is colloquail in nature dating back to the 1800s. This could hinder some understanding of what the character's are saying unless you pay close attention to the bullet points regarding the various terms used. A couple of the war depications written in the "Red Badge" are quite graphic.

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  • Posted April 1, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Psychological Analyses and Wonderful Stories

    This collection of the short-lived genius Stephen Crane includes four stories, "The Red Badge of Courage," "The Open Boat," "The Veteran," and "The Men in the Storm." "The Red Badge of Courage," by far Crane's most famous work, is an unparalleled analysis of battlefield psychology and the human mind itself. It is extremely real and unglorified, and depicts humans for what they are at their core: selfish. The main character's inner thoughts shed light on human depravity, cowardice, and a desire for glory in order to win respect from other men. This is a great discussion starter, and I would reccomend it for book clubs and group reading. In contrast with some previous reviews, I found the book fairly easy to understand, despite its off-beat, introverted way of story-telling.

    The second story in the collection "The Open Boat," a much shorter piece, is equally interesting and worthy of praise. The nameless main character wrestles with the concept of death as he and his fellow crewman try to make it to shore on a tiny dinghy in the midst of a storm. Crane's unique approach rings true especially in this brief tale.

    The last stories, "The Veteran" and "The Men in the Storm" are extremely brief and of a lower quality than the first two, but they are still worth your time.

    If you want some digestable, intriguing, discussion-worthy tales, purchase this collection.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2008

    Too hard to read

    I read this book for an ap english class and found it way too hard to follow. I ended up reading the cliff notes for it instead and the story was very good, but the book is written in language that is extremely hard to comprehend. If you have time to figure it out, it's a great read, else I would probably not recommend it - read the cliff notes instead!

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2007

    A reviewer

    The Red Badge of Courage By Stephen Crane Report by N. Toth If any textbook can match the incredible detail of The Red Badge of Courage, I have yet to see it. This brilliant Civil War epic written by Stephen Crane tells the story of a young man named Henry Fleming¿s first engagement for the Union army. During this struggle, Henry learns what war really is. The reason I loved this book was its amazing clarity and gripping suspense, like when Henry was shot. Another reason to read The Red Badge of Courage is that it brings you into the main character¿s deepest thoughts and feelings, which can be to the extremes of human emotion at times. For example when Henry Fleming was in battle, he had ¿the red sickness of war¿ The Red Badge of Courage is the best war story you will ever read. If you want to experience this heart-pounding adventure, get The Red Badge of Courage !!!!!!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2007

    Don't Waste Your Time!!

    Wow...This book was really bad!!! As Robert Frost said, 'All poems have the right reader.' (It applies to novels to). Either I was just the wrong reader, or this was to bad to be believed.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2006

    Umm... wow.

    I had to read this in eighth grade and it was by far one of the worst books I have ever read. I could barely understand a thing.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2006

    Masterfully Written

    When I started to read this book, I thought that it was going to be really dry and boring, but, when I really started to get into it, I couldn't put it down. Not only did it have great battles civil war style, it delt with the fear of battle. I loved this book and find it the best classic I've ever laid eyes on. I gave it a 4 because the dialoge of the soliders was hard to read.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2006

    A bit boring at some parts

    The Red Badge of Courage is about a young boy who wants to join the Union Army and struggles to find the determination within himself. The book is okay but I've read better books. Some parts are page turners and some are not. Other times you think when all that stuff you read about the Civil War comes in.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 115 Customer Reviews
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