Customer Reviews for

The Report Card

Average Rating 4.5
( 151 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(92)

4 Star

(37)

3 Star

(11)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(7)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

11 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

We love this book!!!!!

This book was an excellent experience. My teacher likes it because of all the juicy vocabulary it uses. This story is about two kids who get in double trouble. Their names are Nora and Stephen. Nora gets a bad report card and their parents are mad at him. After this pro...
This book was an excellent experience. My teacher likes it because of all the juicy vocabulary it uses. This story is about two kids who get in double trouble. Their names are Nora and Stephen. Nora gets a bad report card and their parents are mad at him. After this problem, Nora makes a bigger problem that's out of control! You never know what is gonna to happen next. I'd recommend this book for grades 3 or higher. This book was great and I hope you read this book also.

Parker, from Ms. Edwards class

posted by Edwards on February 3, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

Uggg

This book is terible. So the lessen is to act dumb. The cover makes it looks like it a great book but really it is not. Don't waise your money. It is about a girl named Nora who is a genis but hides that skill and instead fails school and gets C's and D's on her report ...
This book is terible. So the lessen is to act dumb. The cover makes it looks like it a great book but really it is not. Don't waise your money. It is about a girl named Nora who is a genis but hides that skill and instead fails school and gets C's and D's on her report card. She does that to prove that people take grades and tests way to serious. Good job, Nora. Smart. But all and all this book does have some suprises. But all of that is just my opinion. Get the preview before you get the book and see what you think........

posted by Anonymous on July 10, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2013

    To Jade

    Go to the third res so we can chat. And are you locked out here? Your post is gone. I will be on tonight from 2130 EST to ?0000 EST on average. See you soon, hopefully! And I almost always post with three stars unless I am mad.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2012

    Todd's grade

    This book about todd and stephon had their report card and they had to talk about their grade in science,math,reading,social studies.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2007

    The Report Card

    Nora gets off of the bus with her friend Steven. When she looks at her report card she is disappointed. She got all D¿s and one C. She isn¿t disappointed about the D¿s, as a normal child would be. Nora is disappointed with the C. She is an extremely intelligent child that has been hiding her intelligence for years. She doesn¿t want her friends to think they are stupid just because they get a bad grade in school. ¿What if what I really want is to be normal? What if being normal is my big goal in life? Is there anything wrong with that?¿ She doesn¿t care much that she is smart, she just wants to be a normal kid. ¿I know that I'm different, and I hope I'll always be smart. But I don't want to get pushed ahead so that I'm always trying to do what someone else thinks a person with my intelligence ought to be doing. I want to use my intelligence the way I want to use it.¿ Read to find out what happens to Nora. Will her parents and teachers ever realize what she is doing? Andrew Clements is obviously showing that he agrees with Nora. He thinks that grades are not the best way of classifying children. Andrew Clements said, 'Good books make good things happen in real life. They can make a big difference.' He was born in Camden, New Jersey in 1949. He got his love for books and reading from his parents. He went to college at Northwestern University. Later he wrote his first novel, Frindle, which was published in 1996. Since then he has written several books. Clements, Andrew. The Report Card. New York: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2004.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2006

    My Review

    You¿d think Nora would be upset about getting practically all D¿s on her report card, but she¿s not. In fact, Nora worked hard for those grades! This may seem confusing to you, especially after I tell you that Nora is a grade-school genius. Nora has ¿the opposite of amnesia. I don¿t think I¿ve ever forgotten anything,¿ she reveals early on to readers in the book The Report Card. Nora feels she must keep her gift of knowledge a secret and has hidden the fact her entire life ¿ even from her parents! She¿s afraid that if people know how smart she really is that she¿ll be treated differently from the other kids at school. I don¿t think being smart is a bad thing, but for a kid in grade-school being a genius can be troubling. Read The Report Card to find out how Nora¿s bad grades came to be and discover Nora¿s plan to make her school a better place, not only for her, but for everyone.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 26, 2006

    The Report Card Review

    I did not like the book, 'The Report Card'. It was not really entertaining, just a repetition about a smart girl and how she did not believe in test. I believe it will give some students the idea to do rebellious things and that the event can easily be solved. This is not how things really work out. More, then likely there would have been more of a punishment. There was few things I did like about the book. It taught kids to not be afraid to be who they are and uncomfortable with it. And also, some kids will be able to relate to this book that are not good test takers or good at making good grades. Some kids probably feel stupid like Stephen did. Andrew Clements grew up in a family that loved reading. In kindergarten, he was already a good reader. One of his favorite places was the school library. His love for books has continued , and it has led him careers as a teacher, as an editor, and as a writer. Andrew has this to say about his time as a teacher: '...I loved reading good books with kids---the kids at school and also the four boys my wife and I had at home. As a teacher, it was a thrill to read a book aloud, and see a whole class listen so carefully to every word, dying to know what would happen next. And I was amazed at the wonderful discussions a good book can spark. Good books made good things happen in real life. They can make a big difference. So when I was given the chance to start writing for children, I jumped at it'. Andrew lives in Westborough, Massachusetts. His four sons are named John, Nathaniel, George, and Charles. The book, 'The Report Card', is about a girl, Nora, that is very intelligent, but no one knows it. Her family does not know it or her best friend, Stephen, who is not that good at making good grades. Nora decides she will make bad grades to make Stephen look better and also to show others they should not put so much pressure on kids and stress about grades. Her plans starts to slowly unravel after her parents and teachers try to figure out what is going on with her. Then Stephen and Nora get together to form another plan. Which seems like a good idea until it is actually carried out. In the end the end Nora allows everyone to know she is intelligent and no longer cares they think she is a genius. However, her and Stephen must fix the bridges they burnt down with their super plan that gets the entire school in an uproar. 'But the real reason I began being a cat at school was because I knew that if I started doing schoolwork in kindergarten, it would be too easy'. This is the part of the story where Nora is explaining that she knew she was smart, but also knew she would be looked at differently if she showed it. So, when she started kindergarten she started pretending she was a cat instead of doing her work to draw attention away from her somehow. 'I noticed a change in Stephen right away. He got mad at himself if he messed up on assignments or test'. This is the part of the story where Nora is telling about Stephen's bad test scores. His parents and everyone had made a big deal about them, so now Stephen felt like he was dumb.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2014

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2008

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