Customer Reviews for

The Report Card

Average Rating 4.5
( 153 )
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5 Star

(94)

4 Star

(37)

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(11)

2 Star

(4)

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(7)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

11 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

We love this book!!!!!

This book was an excellent experience. My teacher likes it because of all the juicy vocabulary it uses. This story is about two kids who get in double trouble. Their names are Nora and Stephen. Nora gets a bad report card and their parents are mad at him. After this pro...
This book was an excellent experience. My teacher likes it because of all the juicy vocabulary it uses. This story is about two kids who get in double trouble. Their names are Nora and Stephen. Nora gets a bad report card and their parents are mad at him. After this problem, Nora makes a bigger problem that's out of control! You never know what is gonna to happen next. I'd recommend this book for grades 3 or higher. This book was great and I hope you read this book also.

Parker, from Ms. Edwards class

posted by Edwards on February 3, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

Uggg

This book is terible. So the lessen is to act dumb. The cover makes it looks like it a great book but really it is not. Don't waise your money. It is about a girl named Nora who is a genis but hides that skill and instead fails school and gets C's and D's on her report ...
This book is terible. So the lessen is to act dumb. The cover makes it looks like it a great book but really it is not. Don't waise your money. It is about a girl named Nora who is a genis but hides that skill and instead fails school and gets C's and D's on her report card. She does that to prove that people take grades and tests way to serious. Good job, Nora. Smart. But all and all this book does have some suprises. But all of that is just my opinion. Get the preview before you get the book and see what you think........

posted by Anonymous on July 10, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2006

    Realistic Fiction Review The Report Card

    This is a great little book that could be very entertaining to children from the ages of 8 to 12. It is the story of a super genius girl named Nora. She knows that she is a genius, but does not want people to know that she is. She is afraid that people will treat her different if they knew it. She says that she ¿didn¿t want to be stared at.¿ She eventually got caught up in the scam. She has to take a high school level IQ test and makes a great grade on it. She and her friend Stephen then try to pull a scam to show how unimportant grades were and got caught in that also. I encourage kids to read this book and see what all Nora and her friend get into. The author, Andrew Clements, has written more than fifty children¿s books. He used to teach school in Chicago before he moved east to publish and write books. He now lives in Westborough, Massachusetts with his wife. Clements, Andrew. The Report Card. New York: Aladdin Paperbacks, 2004.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2006

    Realistic: The Report Card

    This book is about a genius fifth grader, Nora, who rebels against good grades. The Report Card is written by Andrew Clements. Andrew was born in New Jersey. He attended and graduated from Northwestern University with a Masters of Arts in Teaching. He currently lives in Massachusetts. In this book, Clements uses something simple, like a report card, to reach young children. It is a cute book with lessons for children throughout the book. Nora makes all D¿s on her report card knowing that the report card is extremely important to her parents, and she will get in major trouble. She makes D¿s to make her best friend, Stephen, appear smart. Nora states, ¿I had gotten those Ds for Stephen¿. With much concern, Nora¿s parents talk with the principal and guidance counselor. They perform an IQ test on Nora and find out that she is a genius. Nora and Stephen get an idea to convince all other students to fail their tests, but things get out of control. Stephen and Nora realize what they did wrong and talk to the student body. Nora told the student body, ¿Grades and test scores can make kids feel like winners or losers. I guess it wasn¿t so smart to think that I could change everything by myself, or even with Stephen¿s help. Clements, Andrew. The Report Card. New York: Scholastic, 1994. Reading level: Ages 8-12

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2006

    Grades???

    Did you ever spend the day worrying about what grades you were going to get on your report card? Well, Nora was tired of that and set out to prove that grades were not important at all. Nora was a genius and did not want to be treated differently from the rest of the children in her class so she hid her secret from her parents and teachers. Nora and her friend Stephen come up with a plan to put a stop to test taking and score keeping, only it back fires on them. This Realistic Fiction children¿s book was written by Andrew Clements who has written many middle grade fiction books, chapter books, beginning readers, and picture books.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2006

    A realistic book with a message

    Fifth grader, Nora, knew from an early age, that she could possibily be a genius. The problem was that she didn't want anyone to know. She wanted to be known as Nora, instead of as a genius. Nora taught her self how to read at age 2, and pretended that she didn't, so her parents wouldn't stop reading to her. She read the encyclopedia's and watched education T.V. before she started school. Once in school, she acted like a cat, so no one would bother her. Then she started her first project. She began to watch other students and copy what they were doing. That is how she meet Stephen, who amazed her with everything he done. Nora made average grades, but one year after a statewide test, she began to D's. Stephan hadn't done so good on the test, and everyone began to call him stupid or dumb. That's when Nora began her new project, to prove that Stephen wasn't dumb, and test scores didn't count. In the end, her plan caught up with her, and her life was turned completely around. Her worst fear had come true. The author, Andrew Clements, was born in Camden, New Jersey in 1949. He attended Northern University, where he earned a degree in literature. The next school that he attended was National Louis University, where he received a Master of Arts in Teaching. He taught english class at many different schools and grade levels. After teaching he began to work at a small publishing company and in 1990 he wrote his first novel Frindle. The popularity of the book grew, along with his true passion for writing. I enjoyed this book, because it reminds me of when I was in elementary school, and how grades were the most important part of your life. I still go through that today while attending college. I love how Nora faught the school and her classmate, just to try to tell them that grades should decide who a person is or how popular they are. The book was funny and refreshing. The best realistic fiction book that I have read in a long time. Grade Level: 5th and up Clements, Andrew. The Report Card. New York: Aladdin Paperbacks, 2004.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2006

    Great Book!

    The theme of this book is realistic fiction about real things that can happen in life to anyone. This book is about a young girl named Nora and her best friend Stephen who try to prove that test are made to important in their school. It all starts when Nora gets all D¿s on her report card, but she is really a genius and nobody knows it. Soon the teachers find out by giving her an IQ test that she is very smart and should not be getting D¿s. So, Nora and Stephen plan on making the entire blue team and other students to get all zeros on a few test and the students do. The teacher gets very upset and soon find out Nora¿s plan and confront her. She gets into a lot of trouble but a teachers helps her message of test being to important heard by the school staff and school board. The author of this book Andrew Clements was born in Camden, New Jersey in 1949 and lived in Oaklyn and Cherry Hill until the middle of sixth grade. He say¿s ¿writing felt like hard work¿something that¿s still true today¿. He has written many books and plans on writing even more for kids today.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2006

    The Report Card

    Realistic, This a cute little book. Nora is a 10 year old genius, but no one knows it. Nora is fearful that people will imagine of her as a ¿bloomer¿, not just simple old Nora. This book follows Nora's thoughts and how she learns that no matter what she will always be herself. Andrew Clements was born in Camden, New Jersey in 1949. He was raised in Oaklyn and Cherry Hill, New Jersey till sixth grade. Then he moved to Springfield, Illinois. He graduated from Northwestern and earned a Masters of Arts in Teaching at National Louis University. He lives in Massachusetts now. Bibliography Clements, Andrew. The Report Card. New York: Scholastic, 2004.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2006

    Great Book!!!!!

    This book is a serious book! I love when people think of goals for themselves and then they actually try to achieve it! That is called working hard just to prove a point. This book is a great book. I love the way Mr. Clements thinks. He is a great writer and I hope i am as successful in life as he is!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2006

    An ok book Recommended for you!

    This book was ok . I would recommend it for a older age group(5-6 grade).

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