Customer Reviews for

Republic (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

Average Rating 4
( 86 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 88 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2008

    Good Book - BAD Translation!

    I got this book originally and immediately had problems discerning what the author was trying to tell us. My philosophy professor also told me about problems many people who study Plato's Republic have with this particular translator. I changed it to another translation and found the book so much easier to read and understand. I would never recommend this particular translation

    10 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2009

    BAD BAD BAD Grammar

    This book has had the worst grammar from the beginning. Capitalization off and so is puctuation. Get a different copy. Don't ruin a good story over bad grammar.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 24, 2013

    Excellently captivating and enlightening dialogue.

    Excellently captivating and enlightening dialogue.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2014

    Platos Republic and the Socratic Method

    Plato was a student of sacrates who wrote down the conversations Socrates took part in, he in no way contributes to the conversation himself. Platos Republic is a group of intellects discussing the best form of government however their is one man in the group, Socrates, who has little to add himself but points out every flaw of everyone elses opnion in a systematic form of interrigation known as the Socratic method, the conversation ends when socrates can no longer find any holes in the intellectualls compilation of the perfect government. There are the dialouges of Socrates but they are short and ussually go nowhere, this is the most extensive disective proffessional account of Socrates using his method at its best.

    The Socratic method, only the best lawyers master it, but what is it

    The Socratic method...we all do it, its in short, when someone makes a statement then you ask them two very simple easy to answer questions which everyone there knows the answer to which show that his statement, and those answers to the questions cannot be right at the same time.

    The begining of the conversation gos, who are the happiest, the just or the unjust. and who should rule the government When most say just and one says unjust Socrates gos why the unjust.

    The unjust lookout for themselves and you will see the leaders of the state are better off than the just

    socrates And what is just

    another member: Paying your debts

    socrates:: what if a man lent you his weapon and he gos mad, should you give it back

    member. no that would not be just

    socrates: but it wuld be unjust to never give it back and steel.

    member who believes the unjust rule: yes and the unjust feed off of those who the rule over

    socrates: but how can the unjust rule if the steel from eachother because they are unjust, they would be fighting amongst eachother with no cooperation or leadership

    member who believes the unjust should rule-The unjust cooperate amongst eachother and rule the multitudes

    socrates:therefore those who are ruling are just to eachother, and therefore not completly unjust

    socrates: if the multitudes are not as unjust, and those who are just cooperate would not they bond together and overthrow these few leaders leeching off of them.

    member who believes the unjust should rule: then how do you explain the statemen bing better off than the people?

    socrates: Im saying the people must be given something to their satisfaction in return for allowing the rulers to rule. the rulers may have more but they must give enough back to the people so they are satisfied, and not driven to overthrow their laders, in return the leaders get more, but not at too much of the expense of the people.

    As you can see Socrates sees that the answers to some questions are circumstantial and those who give simple, yes or no, or just or unjust answers must be asked questions as to how their answer can be correct if an attribute of the unjust, incoopertive, would leave them unable to rule in the first place.

    The Socratic method gos deeper and deeper.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2013

    B&N, you ought to know better than to use this translation

    This specific translation is old and very unpopular among philosophers, it is free on project gutenburg, though I'd still say don't waste your time!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2007

    A reviewer

    The Republic is a Middle-Period dialogue written by Plato. This means that Socrates acts more like a mouth-piece to champion Plato's philosophy then as the actual historic Socrates. Here, Plato considers many aspects of political and social philosophy including censorship, city structure, educational systems, and women's role in society. But these interesting themes serve only to help us answer the questions of what is justice and why it is always better to be just than injust. Also, Plato throws in his theory of forms into the deal! This is an incredible book that can serve as a means for discussion and pondering for several readings.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2007

    Thoughr-Provoking

    It's amazing how enjoyable this is and how easy it is to read for someone who does not have a lot of background in philosophy.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2006

    Good but not great

    During his era, Socrates was held as prudent considering his many followers after him (i.e. Plato and Aristotle). However, his interlocutions display a pattern of dismay that many psychologists this day would have charge him for impiety as well! He was a man that was taken way too seriously and should only be credited for having open the minds of many closed minded individuals of that time. The fact that he chooses to defend philosophy but not his own life is indeed a great paradox.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2004

    All Western Philosophy Comes From Here

    This is quite possibly the greatest thing ever put down on paper. Not a book in a true sense (it is actually a dialouge, something that can be looked at as a play almost) it delves into nearly all philosophical ideas brought forth by modern thinkers. Machieavelle, Aquinas, Rosseau- all of their ideologies stem from here. For the uninitiated: 1) Prepare to be surprised. Socrates, besides being brilliant, can also be a funny yet sarcastic a-hole. 2) Don't expect to learn how to live your life from this book. DO expect to get very frustrated. It can be guarenteed that if you take this seriously, your outlook on life will change. Yes, I can guarntee it. Just question yourself. Socrates is shown here to be the greatest lawyer of all time. Get it, learn, live it!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted February 25, 2011

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 88 Customer Reviews
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