Customer Reviews for

Requiem: By the Photographers Who Died in the Vietnam and Indochina War

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2000

    The Viet Nam War In Your Face!

    To begin with I must state that I did not read the book.I saw the photograph's first hand at the Lexington,Ky. History Center with a fellow Vet. The exhibit was to coin a phrase 'awesome'.We both observed places we had experienced many years ago. The pictures told of war as only pictures can, truthfully. When we left the exhibit nothing much was said on our trip home.We reached my stop and Dennis Monohan, my fellow vet and friend hugged me and we both cried . You had to have been in the war at any level to understand .I recommend it for anyone who wants to see the real deal.It is not for the faint of heart, their are some graphic pictures as you would expect from a war book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2006

    Makes 'Platoon' look like Boot Camp

    To me, this is an extraordinarily haunting book that deserves attention. Although mainly a photo book, it also provides short but competent bios on the dead photographers from the eredite Henri Huet, the gung-ho Dickey Chapelle, the cynical yet brilliant Robert Capa. As one starts out the book in the early days of Everett Dixie Reese, and finally reaches the sheer irrationality of the Cambodian years, one goes from reasoning power to later on just emotional hystrionics. There is no political slant or mandate to this book, as gives voice to all sides without a sense of inequality. Not, though, for a fickle reader.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2003

    Great reprints of Great photographs by great photographers

    One of the best Photo books on the vietnam war, showing wide number of iconic Photographs. To bad it was aworded posthumously.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2002

    POWERFUL IMAGES FROM BOTH SIDES OF CONFLICT

    This book is unique. Photographers from both sides of the conflict are given equal ¿voice¿. Two images alone are worth the price: the book opens with an aerial shot of rice paddies in pre-war Vietnam (along with other photos of the beautiful Vietnamese people and their culture pre-war) and toward the end of the book another aerial shot shows the countryside pockmarked with bomb craters. The contrast is riveting. It is also includes some of the most famous shots from the war, from Capa¿s final frames to Burrow¿s door gunner.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2001

    A true treasure

    This magnificent collection of some of the finest and final photographs taken by combat photographers who did not survive the war is unbelievably haunting and powerful. Biographic data on the photographers is also provided. The material relating to those lost in Cambodia is very impressive, as are the photos of some of the worst moments in Cambodian history. The image recorded by Henri Huet of the famous photographer Dickey Chapelle as she lay dying while being given the last rites in the field at Chu Lai in 1965 is very likely the most searing image ever to come out of Vietnam. Tim Page and Horst Faas have given these heroic photographers a wonderful and well-deserved celebration of their lives, their work, and their souls.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

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