Customer Reviews for

Revealing Eden: Save The Pearls Part One

Average Rating 2.5
( 46 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

This book is set in a futuristic Earth where the deterioration o

This book is set in a futuristic Earth where the deterioration of the ozone layer has poisoned most humans with radiation. Resistance to the overheated environment now defines class and beauty. The darker one’s skin is, the higher they are regarded.
Eden Newm...
This book is set in a futuristic Earth where the deterioration of the ozone layer has poisoned most humans with radiation. Resistance to the overheated environment now defines class and beauty. The darker one’s skin is, the higher they are regarded.
Eden Newman is the seventeen year old daughter of a high ranking scientist and while her skills in the lab have protected her, that is about to change. Eden is a Pearl; her white skin makes her a second class citizen in this post-apocalyptic world. If her mating option isn’t picked up by a dark skinned Coal, Eden will be exiled to the brutal sun baked surface to die.
Eden is willing to go to any length to ensure her survival and she makes many mistakes that set events into motion that change her entire life. Everything she thought she knew turns out to be different and she struggles to keep up with her ever changing world.

I very much enjoyed this book! Foyt develops the character wonderfully and while I may not have done the things Eden did, I understand her reasons as a desperate teenager. I don’t want to give away any spoilers, but all of Eden preconceived notions are challenged and if she has the strength to see it though, she could be happier than she’d ever dreamed. The male lead in this book is a Coal named Bramford and I absolutely loved him as a character! He is mysterious and foul tempered and very controlling. But as I was drawn further into this amazing book, the reasons for his behavior were revealed. I am a big fan of the ‘why’ in books, and Foyt does not disappoint.
I received a review copy of this book and was delighted to find that it was a signed hard cover copy. The cover art is captivating and unique. It came with a post card and a bracelet. This book holds a special place on my shelf and I will cherish it for many years to come. I loved that it dealt with a multitude of themes in a fresh and unique way and I would eagerly recommend this book to anyone looking for a bit of escape into another world.


posted by Mandi_Browning on March 26, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

7 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

WARNING WARNING *blinking red signs* This is just completely ra

WARNING WARNING *blinking red signs*

This is just completely racist, I read a lot of excerpts and I had to laugh to keep from crying or puking. Not only is the whole premise extremely offensive (blackface, "others", "the rest of them") and wrong (me...
WARNING WARNING *blinking red signs*

This is just completely racist, I read a lot of excerpts and I had to laugh to keep from crying or puking. Not only is the whole premise extremely offensive (blackface, "others", "the rest of them") and wrong (melanin does not actually act as any kind of decent sunscreen) but the narrative development is atrocious. I swear if this turns into a best-seller someone will have to stop me from throwing myself off a cliff.

posted by Simone_Maia on July 27, 2012

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Page 1 of 3
  • Posted July 27, 2012

    WARNING WARNING *blinking red signs* This is just completely ra

    WARNING WARNING *blinking red signs*

    This is just completely racist, I read a lot of excerpts and I had to laugh to keep from crying or puking. Not only is the whole premise extremely offensive (blackface, "others", "the rest of them") and wrong (melanin does not actually act as any kind of decent sunscreen) but the narrative development is atrocious. I swear if this turns into a best-seller someone will have to stop me from throwing myself off a cliff.

    7 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2012

    One day, the author was insulted because of her so called "

    One day, the author was insulted because of her so called "bee-stung lips" and was offended because it was a insult usually hurled at afro-american PoC. So instead of sympathizing with peopel that suffer worse treatment their whole lives, she writes a self-pitying ego-trip where white girls are victims. Way to go.

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2012

    I'm sorry, but this book is simply a terrible example of modern

    I'm sorry, but this book is simply a terrible example of modern fiction and a shameful piece of racist creepiness.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 27, 2012

    Racist, unoriginal, and pathetic. Black face is unacceptable. Fo

    Racist, unoriginal, and pathetic. Black face is unacceptable. Following the racist 'people of color are animals' belief through to make it literal. Really disgusting. I don't know how this trash got published but this author should be ashamed of herself.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 27, 2012

    Racist Trash

    An excellent example of how white supremacy destroys minds. And really? black face on your cover?

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2012

    Boycott this racist POC shaming filth.

    In a society where white people are seen as the bottom and PoC are seen as the top--Victoria Foyt will still find a way to make sure the book is full of blatant racism, dangerous stereotypes, dehumanization of People of Color and white supremacy. Do not support this book.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 26, 2012

    This book is set in a futuristic Earth where the deterioration o

    This book is set in a futuristic Earth where the deterioration of the ozone layer has poisoned most humans with radiation. Resistance to the overheated environment now defines class and beauty. The darker one’s skin is, the higher they are regarded.
    Eden Newman is the seventeen year old daughter of a high ranking scientist and while her skills in the lab have protected her, that is about to change. Eden is a Pearl; her white skin makes her a second class citizen in this post-apocalyptic world. If her mating option isn’t picked up by a dark skinned Coal, Eden will be exiled to the brutal sun baked surface to die.
    Eden is willing to go to any length to ensure her survival and she makes many mistakes that set events into motion that change her entire life. Everything she thought she knew turns out to be different and she struggles to keep up with her ever changing world.

    I very much enjoyed this book! Foyt develops the character wonderfully and while I may not have done the things Eden did, I understand her reasons as a desperate teenager. I don’t want to give away any spoilers, but all of Eden preconceived notions are challenged and if she has the strength to see it though, she could be happier than she’d ever dreamed. The male lead in this book is a Coal named Bramford and I absolutely loved him as a character! He is mysterious and foul tempered and very controlling. But as I was drawn further into this amazing book, the reasons for his behavior were revealed. I am a big fan of the ‘why’ in books, and Foyt does not disappoint.
    I received a review copy of this book and was delighted to find that it was a signed hard cover copy. The cover art is captivating and unique. It came with a post card and a bracelet. This book holds a special place on my shelf and I will cherish it for many years to come. I loved that it dealt with a multitude of themes in a fresh and unique way and I would eagerly recommend this book to anyone looking for a bit of escape into another world.


    3 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2012

    how about...instead of creating a fictional world in which white

    how about...instead of creating a fictional world in which white people oppressed, we actually listen to people of color's ACTUAL, REAL LIFE experiences? why does oppression have to be framed from a white (or straight or male) perspective in order for it to be taken seriously? that's completely messed up.

    if you insist on reading about oppression framed from a white perspective, try Noughts and Crosses. it's written by a black woman who has ACTUALLY experienced racism and oppression.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2012

    Racism is only the beginning

    In this badly-written piece of trash, the author expounds racist philosophy and claims to be "reverse-racist" without the slightest idea of what any of that means. There's also sexism, inappropriate understanding of how the world actually works, and a severe lack of writing skill. Avoid at all costs.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2012

    One star is being too generous

    This book is nothing more than racist drivel. Do not waste your time or hard-earned money on it.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2012

    This book is racist, it's bad, it's bad, it's bad, it's RACIST a

    This book is racist, it's bad, it's bad, it's bad, it's RACIST and it definitely should not be what a twelve year old should be reading.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 20, 2012

    Revealing Eden is set in a future where those with the lightest

    Revealing Eden is set in a future where those with the lightest skin have died of "The Heat" caused by the intense temperatures that now plague the world. Those with the darkest skin and the most melanin to protect them from The Heat, or the "Coals" are on top, while those with the lightest skin, or the "Pearls" are on bottom, and all others in the middle. Eden Newman is a Pearl, on the bottom rung of society. While she is the daughter of a highly regarded scientist and a good assistant, even that won't protect her from losing her government assistance if she does not find a mate by her 18th birthday. Through a series of events, Eden finds herself thrown out of the only home she's known and into the rainforest with her injured father and a half beast man. Eden must disregard any prior ideals about race and love if she is to survive in this new world.

    Although I enjoyed Revealing Eden, I did have a few problems with it. When I first started this book, I wasn't completely sucked in to Eden's world. I felt that I couldn't connect with her, but I'm glad I held on and kept reading because I slowly began to be feel for Eden and I to connect with her. I loved the way she put such an emphasis on class in the Combs (where Eden lives before she is thrown out), but as the story progresses in the jungle, racial profiling begins to fade into the background. The male lead of this book is foul tempered and mysterious, with his reasons slowly revealed throughout the course of the book. Although there was an attraction, it wasn't the "instant love" the drives me up the wall with annoyance. The love slowly sizzles to a fiery boil at times, but never gets over PG. All ends and questions are tied up nicely by the end of Revealing Eden.

    Overall, this was a great book that I will read again! It wasn't one that I instantly connected with, but once I understood what was going on and who the characters were, I really enjoyed this read. I definitely give this book a 4 out of 5 and can't wait for the next one in the series!

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 18, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Let's set the stage for Revealing Eden: Save the Pearls. Eden li

    Let's set the stage for Revealing Eden: Save the Pearls. Eden lives in a world where major sun flares have caused everyone to move underground. Due to excessive UV rays, most white people have succumbed to something akin to sun poisoning and died. For their more resilient skin color, people of darker skin tone have become the desired mates in order to carry over their genes which are less affected by the sun.

    Eden has always be ridiculed for being pasty a.k.a. a Pearl. In this society, you have to either mate by the age of eighteen or get kicked to the surface. And Eden is almost eighteen. The problem is that she's pretty low on the mating totem pole and refuses to mate with another Pearl even if that means getting kicked out to the surface and thus death. Luckily for Eden, her father is a genius and in charge of a top secret project for Bramford, a powerful black man, a.k.a. Coal, so she has been able to live in relative comfort up to this point. Sure, Bramford has always seemed to have it out for Eden but it's the last thing on Eden's mind. A good-looking Coal named Jamal might want to be her mate and that's all she's focused on.

    When her father's project goes go array and Eden, her father and Bramford are forced to the surface, she has to leave Jamal behind and look past her prejudices against her own skin color in order to survive and be happy. I really liked the caustic and often volatile relationship between Eden and Bramford. Bramford is powerful, smart and overwhelming and he was a great love interest, emphasis on the interest. You'll know why I find him so interesting if you read the book. I don't want to spoil that since it's a big part of the story.

    Some minuses for this book are that Eden had a major case of idiotitis; she was constantly doing things that put herself in danger. Good intentions aside, she was just plain stupid sometimes. Cue Bramford coming to save her which is always hot but still it got annoying the third time around.

    The bigger problem I had with this whole story was that I got the impression that it was supposed to be the complete opposite of today's world in terms of what people consider attractive. Eden thinks she's hideous because of her white skin and blue eyes and constantly wonders what it would have been like when people considered Pearls as beautiful. If this was true reversal of today's beauty values, which I think it was supposed to be, then the author is saying that black people are not thought of as attractive today and only people like Eden, white with light eyes, are attractive. I really liked reading a YA novel with minority characters who are major love interests but I didn't like the message I was getting from this book. The names for each group only seem to emphasis my point. White skin is undesirable but yet they are called things like Pearls and Cottons. Then there are Tiger's Eyes (Latino?) and Ambers (mixed Asian and black) who were in the middle. Lastly, there were Coals, the darkest skin tone. Coals? Not really as appealing as Pearls or Ambers. Why not Ebony or something? It just reinforced the message I got from this novel.

    OVERALL:

    The message in this novel was a bit disturbing to me. I'm not sure if I was misreading it or not. For the most part, I liked the story and thought the concept was interesting.---6.0 out of 10

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 8, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    was given this book to review by the author in January and I am

    was given this book to review by the author in January and I am just getting to it. I apologize to Ms. Foyt, but it was really worth the wait! Yes, this book is about a post-apocalyptic society, but it's very different from other post-apocalyptic society books I've read. Light-skinned people, Pearls, are at the bottom of the pecking order and dark-skinned people, Coals, are the ruling class. Eden, a Pearl, undergoes getting a coating periodically so that she will appear dark-skinned and not upset the Coals. Her father, a Pearl, is also a scientist and the man who owns the Combs where they live sets him up with a laboratory so he can conduct research experiments. He is looking for a way to adapt the human race using characteristics from various animals so that humans can survive the outside world. At the time, everyone lived in tunnels underground called The Combs. On the night of the big trial, things happen and Bramford, the owner, ends up volunteering to be the test subject for this experiment, then kidnaps Eden and her father and takes them to a jungle far away. This story is about Eden's experiences with survival and how she learns what is truly important. A really good read!

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 7, 2012

    A well-balanced blend of dystopia, adventure romance, fantasy and sci-fi

    Revealing Eden is one of the most amazing dystopian novels! It has a truly unique concept, an awesome post-apocalyptic setting, and tons of suspense that build into a deliciously romantic storyline that is capricious yet fulfilling to read. The book’s cover drew me in, and then I went to the website and checked out all the cool book trailers. SERIOUSLY, I have never seen such cool videos for a book. Super thought-provoking and intriguing—I had to see what this book was about.

    In a future world where the sun overheats and kills millions of people with light skin in a “Great Meltdown,” the remaining population is immersed a racist scenario where the stereotypes of the 20th century are completely turned upside down. “Pearls” are the light-skinned people, who are seen as lowly and inferior to “Coals,” whose darker skin protects them from the sun’s fatal, blistering rays. In an effort to manage resources, the population is forced to mate by a certain age. The protagonist, Eden Newman, is a Pearl whose 18th birthday is around the corner. If she doesn’t mate by then, she’ll be cast out into The Heat, her resources cut off and left to die.

    Without getting too far into the very creative plot, I have to say I was completely riveted by this novel! Author Victoria Foyt is a master at building tension and creating a dramatic character arc—Revealing Eden is a serious page-turner. In the beginning, you feel sorry for Eden but at the same time, frustrated. By the end, she evolves into a true heroine and a woman to be reckoned with. The fantasy romance element of it throws you for a serious loop and has the perfect amount of tension to keep it PG-13, but not boring. At All.

    Revealing Eden has a well-balanced blend of adventure romance, sci-fi, suspense, mystery and dystopian elements. What I think is most important about this book is that it really makes you think about the world we live in and appreciate what we have.

    I cannot wait to read the rest of the Save the Pearls series!

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 5, 2012

    A gripping page turner

    Revealing Eden is brilliantly paced—it’s such a page turner and is extremely difficult to put down. I just kept thinking “One more chapter—one more chapter.”

    What I love about dystopian novels is their ability to make us look at ourselves and what the world can become if we’re not willing to change—and author Victoria Foyt gets the reader to do exactly that. The premise of a post-apocalyptic world where, after a “Great Meltdown,” humans with lighter skin, aka Pearls, are at the bottom of the caste/class system due to a lack of melanin to protect them from the radiation given off by the overheated sun. Pearls are considered the lowest of the low and ugly, which makes it hard for them to survive, since due to limited resources and a government mandate, women must mate by their 18th birthday and men by their 24th or 25th.

    The main character, Eden Newman, is on the verge of her 18th and desperate to find a mate so she can survive. Since she’s in a secret relationship with a highly desirable man of a dark skinned race, aka the Coals, Eden hopes that she may have a chance, until a betrayal and misunderstanding throws her entire world into chaos.

    I related to Eden very well and loved figuring things out at the same she did during the book. She grows immensely throughout, learning to accept herself and realize that she is actually beautiful. And in a world where true love seems to be a myth, she discovers that it may actually exist. The plot is well-crafted and extremely unique, and all the characters are believable.

    The descriptions in the book are amazing and thorough, yet enjoyable to read and don’t overload you. The elements of tension are incredible, which is what I think makes it such a page turner. It was hard not to think about how horrifying society could easily become—a world of extreme racism and danger caused by a deteriorated environment.

    Foyt is now one of my favorite new authors! I can’t wait for the second installment of Save the Pearls and look forward to what else she has in store.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 9, 2012

    With dystopian books on the rise it’s difficult to find so

    With dystopian books on the rise it’s difficult to find something that sways away from kill or be killed situations. I know that it’s common to put love and romance on the back burner in the dystopian genre. Let’s face it, that’s not always the focal point to grabbing that particular audience. Revealing Eden crosses that line with superior story telling and gives the dystopian genre an opportunity to entice the romantics who shun away from the typical end of the world novels.

    This can be easily compared to the classic story of Beauty and the Beast. But Beauty didn’t have an identity crisis and Beast wasn’t exactly okay with his transition. There is a much bigger picture with their story—seriously, much bigger, because there will be a second book in the series entitled Adapting Eden that I can’t wait to read. Victoria Foyt’s Revealing Eden has an opportunity to gain an audience of women who don’t usually read teen books and another by enticing non-dystopian readers who are romantics at heart. So for Earth’s sake read Revealing Eden and don’t be left behind.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 8, 2012

    This Review Will Be Up On the Blog Soon!

    Eden's is a white skinned girl, racially slurred as a "Pearl" by the darker skinned, more desirable, people ("Coals"). In this world it's not so great being a blond bombshell, because Pearls are more susceptible to catching a disease called `The Heat' from exposure to the Sun. For this reason, darker skinned people are trying to breed them out entirely and treat them really poorly.

    Eden works in a laboratory with her father, who is a super smart scientist working on the cure to `The Heat' (Hence the subtitle, Save the Pearls). She accidently screws up her father's experiment though and, as a result, her boss/ future love interest Branford is turned into a super sexy Jaguar creature.

    Branford, Eden, and her father end up being chased into the last rainforest on Earth in order to escape the Federation of Free People, a group of Coals that are trying to make Pearls extinct. It's there that Eden has to decide whether she can trust Branford, and maybe find love, or if she should betray him in an effort to Save the Pearls.

    All in all, this book was a really great read. I loved the sexual tension between Branford and Eden! Foyt really kept me guessing the whole time too, which is one of the things I loved most about it. Once I started reading it, I just couldn't put it down. It moves super fast and I just couldn't wait to see what happened next. I also really liked that the plot was so complex, but I still got it.

    I think the most important part is that, once I was finished reading it, I realized that it had a message about beauty and racism. Eden needed to learn about accepting herself, which is something I think my friends and I all work on pretty much all the time. I really related to her character and liked that she changed a lot by the end. All in all, this book was awesome!

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 6, 2012

    This is a fantastic book. It is a very original piece of work ab

    This is a fantastic book. It is a very original piece of work about a girl named Eden that lives in a post apocolyptic world where everyone lives underground to avoid the over heated atmosphere. People are discriminated against for having light skin, like Eden, they are called Pearls. And if they do not mate by the age of 18, they are sent outside to die in the heat. Eden is just a few short months from turning 18. Will she find a mate in time?

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 1, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    The book blurb reminded me of the TV show Unforgettable, where D

    The book blurb reminded me of the TV show Unforgettable, where Detective Carrie Wells remembers everything she sees. In fact, that's one of the reasons I wanted to read this one! Brenna Spector is a little like Carrie, only her memories don't seem to be as controlled and she can sometimes drift away into the past. While fascinating, this ability also sounds like an incredible burden. Some things are better left to hazy recollections, softened by time.

    Brenna is an investigator who specializes in missing persons. While I kept comparing her to Carrie Wells at first, she soon became her own person. She seemed more vulnerable than Carrie, maybe because she had less control over her memory? While reading, I wasn't sure if I liked Brenna or not, but wound up liking her by the end and wanting to learn more about her and her life!

    The mystery itself is rather strange. Carol Wentz blames herself for the disappearance of a little girl eleven years ago and has been obsessing about it ever since. That didn't ring true for me, as it wasn't really Carol's fault and I didn't believe that she would do some of the things she did. Then Carol disappears, and her wallet is found in the missing girl's old house. Curiouser and curiouser....

    Found myself more interested in Brenna, her struggles with living with her Super Memory, and how it affected both her personal and professional life than in Carol's disappearance. I didn't really like Carol, Carol's husband, or any of the other characters involved in the disappearance and just wanted to get back to Brenna. Because of that, I gave this one a 3/5 as while I liked it, the main plot kept getting in the way! Really liked the main character, but didn't care about the mystery. Does that make sense?

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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