Customer Reviews for

Revealing Eden (Save the Pearls, Part One)

Average Rating 2.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

This book is set in a futuristic Earth where the deterioration o

This book is set in a futuristic Earth where the deterioration of the ozone layer has poisoned most humans with radiation. Resistance to the overheated environment now defines class and beauty. The darker one’s skin is, the higher they are regarded.
Eden Newm...
This book is set in a futuristic Earth where the deterioration of the ozone layer has poisoned most humans with radiation. Resistance to the overheated environment now defines class and beauty. The darker one’s skin is, the higher they are regarded.
Eden Newman is the seventeen year old daughter of a high ranking scientist and while her skills in the lab have protected her, that is about to change. Eden is a Pearl; her white skin makes her a second class citizen in this post-apocalyptic world. If her mating option isn’t picked up by a dark skinned Coal, Eden will be exiled to the brutal sun baked surface to die.
Eden is willing to go to any length to ensure her survival and she makes many mistakes that set events into motion that change her entire life. Everything she thought she knew turns out to be different and she struggles to keep up with her ever changing world.

I very much enjoyed this book! Foyt develops the character wonderfully and while I may not have done the things Eden did, I understand her reasons as a desperate teenager. I don’t want to give away any spoilers, but all of Eden preconceived notions are challenged and if she has the strength to see it though, she could be happier than she’d ever dreamed. The male lead in this book is a Coal named Bramford and I absolutely loved him as a character! He is mysterious and foul tempered and very controlling. But as I was drawn further into this amazing book, the reasons for his behavior were revealed. I am a big fan of the ‘why’ in books, and Foyt does not disappoint.
I received a review copy of this book and was delighted to find that it was a signed hard cover copy. The cover art is captivating and unique. It came with a post card and a bracelet. This book holds a special place on my shelf and I will cherish it for many years to come. I loved that it dealt with a multitude of themes in a fresh and unique way and I would eagerly recommend this book to anyone looking for a bit of escape into another world.


posted by Mandi_Browning on March 26, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

7 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

WARNING WARNING *blinking red signs* This is just completely ra

WARNING WARNING *blinking red signs*

This is just completely racist, I read a lot of excerpts and I had to laugh to keep from crying or puking. Not only is the whole premise extremely offensive (blackface, "others", "the rest of them") and wrong (me...
WARNING WARNING *blinking red signs*

This is just completely racist, I read a lot of excerpts and I had to laugh to keep from crying or puking. Not only is the whole premise extremely offensive (blackface, "others", "the rest of them") and wrong (melanin does not actually act as any kind of decent sunscreen) but the narrative development is atrocious. I swear if this turns into a best-seller someone will have to stop me from throwing myself off a cliff.

posted by Simone_Maia on July 27, 2012

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  • Posted July 20, 2012

    Revealing Eden is set in a future where those with the lightest

    Revealing Eden is set in a future where those with the lightest skin have died of "The Heat" caused by the intense temperatures that now plague the world. Those with the darkest skin and the most melanin to protect them from The Heat, or the "Coals" are on top, while those with the lightest skin, or the "Pearls" are on bottom, and all others in the middle. Eden Newman is a Pearl, on the bottom rung of society. While she is the daughter of a highly regarded scientist and a good assistant, even that won't protect her from losing her government assistance if she does not find a mate by her 18th birthday. Through a series of events, Eden finds herself thrown out of the only home she's known and into the rainforest with her injured father and a half beast man. Eden must disregard any prior ideals about race and love if she is to survive in this new world.

    Although I enjoyed Revealing Eden, I did have a few problems with it. When I first started this book, I wasn't completely sucked in to Eden's world. I felt that I couldn't connect with her, but I'm glad I held on and kept reading because I slowly began to be feel for Eden and I to connect with her. I loved the way she put such an emphasis on class in the Combs (where Eden lives before she is thrown out), but as the story progresses in the jungle, racial profiling begins to fade into the background. The male lead of this book is foul tempered and mysterious, with his reasons slowly revealed throughout the course of the book. Although there was an attraction, it wasn't the "instant love" the drives me up the wall with annoyance. The love slowly sizzles to a fiery boil at times, but never gets over PG. All ends and questions are tied up nicely by the end of Revealing Eden.

    Overall, this was a great book that I will read again! It wasn't one that I instantly connected with, but once I understood what was going on and who the characters were, I really enjoyed this read. I definitely give this book a 4 out of 5 and can't wait for the next one in the series!

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 8, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    was given this book to review by the author in January and I am

    was given this book to review by the author in January and I am just getting to it. I apologize to Ms. Foyt, but it was really worth the wait! Yes, this book is about a post-apocalyptic society, but it's very different from other post-apocalyptic society books I've read. Light-skinned people, Pearls, are at the bottom of the pecking order and dark-skinned people, Coals, are the ruling class. Eden, a Pearl, undergoes getting a coating periodically so that she will appear dark-skinned and not upset the Coals. Her father, a Pearl, is also a scientist and the man who owns the Combs where they live sets him up with a laboratory so he can conduct research experiments. He is looking for a way to adapt the human race using characteristics from various animals so that humans can survive the outside world. At the time, everyone lived in tunnels underground called The Combs. On the night of the big trial, things happen and Bramford, the owner, ends up volunteering to be the test subject for this experiment, then kidnaps Eden and her father and takes them to a jungle far away. This story is about Eden's experiences with survival and how she learns what is truly important. A really good read!

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 1, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    The book blurb reminded me of the TV show Unforgettable, where D

    The book blurb reminded me of the TV show Unforgettable, where Detective Carrie Wells remembers everything she sees. In fact, that's one of the reasons I wanted to read this one! Brenna Spector is a little like Carrie, only her memories don't seem to be as controlled and she can sometimes drift away into the past. While fascinating, this ability also sounds like an incredible burden. Some things are better left to hazy recollections, softened by time.

    Brenna is an investigator who specializes in missing persons. While I kept comparing her to Carrie Wells at first, she soon became her own person. She seemed more vulnerable than Carrie, maybe because she had less control over her memory? While reading, I wasn't sure if I liked Brenna or not, but wound up liking her by the end and wanting to learn more about her and her life!

    The mystery itself is rather strange. Carol Wentz blames herself for the disappearance of a little girl eleven years ago and has been obsessing about it ever since. That didn't ring true for me, as it wasn't really Carol's fault and I didn't believe that she would do some of the things she did. Then Carol disappears, and her wallet is found in the missing girl's old house. Curiouser and curiouser....

    Found myself more interested in Brenna, her struggles with living with her Super Memory, and how it affected both her personal and professional life than in Carol's disappearance. I didn't really like Carol, Carol's husband, or any of the other characters involved in the disappearance and just wanted to get back to Brenna. Because of that, I gave this one a 3/5 as while I liked it, the main plot kept getting in the way! Really liked the main character, but didn't care about the mystery. Does that make sense?

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 24, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Wow! Fascinating and Creative Great for Fans of Dytopians

    This was an incredibly fast paced and creative story. The primary theme is that the world has suffered apocalyptic catastrophes of sum sort and living on the surface is not feasible. Therefore, anyone with light skins, "pearls" died or is sure to die if they get near the surface. They are weaker and therefore, the Coals, the people with more melanin in their skin become the ruling class. What's worse, if a male or female doesn't mate by the time they are 18, their resources are cut off and the eventually die. But Eden has bigger problems! She's just escaped with her wounded father and a man she despises with the FFP after them, a group that wants to kill all Pearls. And she's not sure how she'll survive on the surface. Or how she'll survive Ranson Bramford. This is a fresh, creative, fast paced novel with an interesting take on how to save mankind in this changed world. It's pretty clean except for some suggestive talk. Maybe a few bad words. Nothing excessive.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 30, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    The author skillfully created a world that comes to life on the pages of this book.

    Revealing Eden is a novel written for young adults but with a message for everyone. Eden is a Pearl, the lowest of the low in her civilization. There is no love lost between Eden and Ronson Bramfor, her and her father¿s employer. When two men from the resistance corner Eden, Bramford comes to her rescue but however they are both taken captive.

    When Eden's father needs people to use as guinea pigs for his project, Bramford insists he use the serum on him. Then he takes both Eden and her father to a remote destination to keep them safe. There Eden begins to see another side of Bramford and learns about his earlier life. She has to decide if she can accept Bramford as he is now and if she wants to be like him.

    The author paints a picture of a futuristic world rampant with discrimination. Pearls are a dying breed of humans. Coals are the superior race with their dark skin. Eden is a strong female lead, unwilling to let society or anyone else dictate with who or when she will enter a relationship. When everything falls apart she proves her strength of character as she tries to keep her father, Bramford's son and herself safe. The author also demonstrates how we must be willing to be strong and yet bend. The change and growth of Eden's character are the big selling points of this book. The romantic tension between Eden and Bramson slowly builds in this tale. While the reader knows from the beginning Eden and Bramson belong together the author does not rush the relationship. The author skillfully created a world that comes to life on the pages of this book.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2013

    I'll admit, I started reading Save the Pearls after seeing some

    I'll admit, I started reading Save the Pearls after seeing some of the negative press about the novel; I'm not one to pass judgment when I don't have all of the facts. But once I started reading Revealing Eden, it took me less than a 100 pages before I realized my hand was over my mouth, as I was gasping at each new action-filled page.
    Foyt's post apocalyptic universe creates stunning visuals and delivers a dystopian world different than anything YA fans could have ever imagined. Unlike other YA novels, Save the Pearls' world isn't struggling because of a lack of resources, they are struggling from a depleting population and a society that can no longer survive above ground. Foyt brings Darwinism into a realistic light, as "The Heat" slowly kills off Caucasians, forcing humans to be divided by race, as if they were different species. She put a futuristic, eye-opening spin on this dystopia that plagued my mind for weeks.
    Eden's internal struggles and paralyzing fear of the world around her rings true for many of my fellow introverts. Her sudden bursts of self-confidence are reminiscent of any pubescent teen who has stumbled upon a little faith in themselves while struggling to find their place in the world. When Eden finally found her footing and realized that the key to true beauty was within herself, and real love couldn't be found until she accepted who she was as a person, I was moved to tears.
    Revealing Eden truly teaches the lesson, don't judge a book by its cover (or reviews). Don't let the negative press deter you. I guarantee most have not taken the time to experience this wonderful novel. Revealing Eden was a truly inspiring novel, and I can't wait to read what happens in the sequel.

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