BN.com Gift Guide
Customer Reviews for

Reviving Ophelia

Average Rating 4
( 60 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(30)

4 Star

(14)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(5)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

Reviving Ophelia & My Experiences

I opened Reviving Ophelia with an open mind. As a 17-year old high school junior, I am usually turned off by books that my mother and teacher enjoy. This one, however, was much different. Immediately, I was pulled into the book. Maybe it was because I realized that ...
I opened Reviving Ophelia with an open mind. As a 17-year old high school junior, I am usually turned off by books that my mother and teacher enjoy. This one, however, was much different. Immediately, I was pulled into the book. Maybe it was because I realized that I am one of the girls Pipher is talking about; I am Ophelia. I doubt if I was a boy or even a father I would be very interested, but because it pertained to me directly I was pulled into the reading. I could relate to each and every one of the 'characters' in one way or another. I felt for these girls and their problems, and each and every one of them contributed to the book. I don't think I've ever read a book before and was able to just say 'Yes! I know exactly what you are talking about!' It's nice to know that there are actual studies done on teenagers; that someone would think to take the time to figure out what it is with teenagers (girls in particular) that make us the way we are. Mary Pipher's main thesis is practically the life of every teenage girl out there, including myself. It makes me realize that as a young teenage girl, I am not alone. By reading this book, I have learned that society just expects boys to be able to handle more on their own and be more independent than girls. That is just an assumption made by many. As to if it's true or not, I couldn't say because I am not a boy, I have no brothers, and I have never read a book about the lifestyle of a teenage boy. A lot of girls today no longer have the support behind them telling them 'You are not alone'. The author's tone was very sympathetic and understanding to the girls, and she told each story with a personal glimpse behind it. It's almost as if Mary Pipher had known each and every one of those girls for years. Each tale of the unique girls had a conflict and resolution. Throughout the last third of the book, a lot of the girls' problems had to do with their relationships with others. Boyfriends, moms, dads, and siblings were all common topics. Some of the girls that I read about were so interesting that I wish I could read more about them. Mary Pipher has established a theme that growing up as an adolescent girl is not easy. It's challenging, confusing, scary, and exciting all at the same time. Adults sit back and watch us run and fall, and they have to step back and let us get up on our own. We won't learn anything by not falling, but there comes a point when the last time you fall and you feel as though you are never going to make it back up, an adult is needed to lend that hand and pick us back up. Pipher calls it 'girl-poisoning'. Girls are pushed to be someone they aren't; do things they don't want to do; and be happy doing it. There is media, sexism, feminism, and raging hormones that are everywhere. Throughout this book, these girls' tales have been completely real and un-cut. They tell it how it is, and then Pipher explains the psychological aspects behind what they feel and think. One of my favorite phrases in the book was, 'Ophelia died because she could not grow. She became the object of others' lives and lost her true subjective self.' (Pipher 292) Ophelia is from Shakespeare's Hamlet. In Hamlet, she is a free and happy child who loses herself at adolescence. When she falls in love with Hamlet, her only objective in life becomes living for his approval. Torn apart by her efforts to please both her Hamlet and her parents, she loses the fight when Hamlet rejects her for being a compliant daughter. Beset by grief, and without any inner direction, Ophelia drowns in a creek, weighed down by her heavy and elegant clothes. Pipher uses the title Reviving Ophelia in reference to bringing back what died inside Ophelia- that adolescence innocence. Is it really possible to bring back a self that you lost? And if you did bring back that self, would it be the same thing? Mary Pipher is posing the question, What can we as a society do to help adolescent

posted by Anonymous on January 4, 2005

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

what the hell?

this book does NOT explain teens today. it is very outdated and repetitive. what she basically says is: a) teens lose all interest in sports b) teens lose all communication with parents c) teens become depressed d) yada yada yada and i just couldn't read any m...
this book does NOT explain teens today. it is very outdated and repetitive. what she basically says is: a) teens lose all interest in sports b) teens lose all communication with parents c) teens become depressed d) yada yada yada and i just couldn't read any more. a waste of my time.

posted by Anonymous on June 29, 2008

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 30 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 2
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2005

    Reviving Ophelia & My Experiences

    I opened Reviving Ophelia with an open mind. As a 17-year old high school junior, I am usually turned off by books that my mother and teacher enjoy. This one, however, was much different. Immediately, I was pulled into the book. Maybe it was because I realized that I am one of the girls Pipher is talking about; I am Ophelia. I doubt if I was a boy or even a father I would be very interested, but because it pertained to me directly I was pulled into the reading. I could relate to each and every one of the 'characters' in one way or another. I felt for these girls and their problems, and each and every one of them contributed to the book. I don't think I've ever read a book before and was able to just say 'Yes! I know exactly what you are talking about!' It's nice to know that there are actual studies done on teenagers; that someone would think to take the time to figure out what it is with teenagers (girls in particular) that make us the way we are. Mary Pipher's main thesis is practically the life of every teenage girl out there, including myself. It makes me realize that as a young teenage girl, I am not alone. By reading this book, I have learned that society just expects boys to be able to handle more on their own and be more independent than girls. That is just an assumption made by many. As to if it's true or not, I couldn't say because I am not a boy, I have no brothers, and I have never read a book about the lifestyle of a teenage boy. A lot of girls today no longer have the support behind them telling them 'You are not alone'. The author's tone was very sympathetic and understanding to the girls, and she told each story with a personal glimpse behind it. It's almost as if Mary Pipher had known each and every one of those girls for years. Each tale of the unique girls had a conflict and resolution. Throughout the last third of the book, a lot of the girls' problems had to do with their relationships with others. Boyfriends, moms, dads, and siblings were all common topics. Some of the girls that I read about were so interesting that I wish I could read more about them. Mary Pipher has established a theme that growing up as an adolescent girl is not easy. It's challenging, confusing, scary, and exciting all at the same time. Adults sit back and watch us run and fall, and they have to step back and let us get up on our own. We won't learn anything by not falling, but there comes a point when the last time you fall and you feel as though you are never going to make it back up, an adult is needed to lend that hand and pick us back up. Pipher calls it 'girl-poisoning'. Girls are pushed to be someone they aren't; do things they don't want to do; and be happy doing it. There is media, sexism, feminism, and raging hormones that are everywhere. Throughout this book, these girls' tales have been completely real and un-cut. They tell it how it is, and then Pipher explains the psychological aspects behind what they feel and think. One of my favorite phrases in the book was, 'Ophelia died because she could not grow. She became the object of others' lives and lost her true subjective self.' (Pipher 292) Ophelia is from Shakespeare's Hamlet. In Hamlet, she is a free and happy child who loses herself at adolescence. When she falls in love with Hamlet, her only objective in life becomes living for his approval. Torn apart by her efforts to please both her Hamlet and her parents, she loses the fight when Hamlet rejects her for being a compliant daughter. Beset by grief, and without any inner direction, Ophelia drowns in a creek, weighed down by her heavy and elegant clothes. Pipher uses the title Reviving Ophelia in reference to bringing back what died inside Ophelia- that adolescence innocence. Is it really possible to bring back a self that you lost? And if you did bring back that self, would it be the same thing? Mary Pipher is posing the question, What can we as a society do to help adolescent

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2012

    Great

    I read this for my journalism class this past summer, and I loved it. Not only did it answer some big questions of mine, but - as a high schooler- it helped me understand what girls my age are going through. It's a great book for anyone trying to understand a teen girl's mind and its a great read.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2012

    Relatable

    I am a twelve year old girl with depression, and even though I've only read the sample(because my mom wanted it and I was curious as to what she wanted) it just reminded me of my elementary days. I used to run around all the time, speak my own mind, not worry about what others thought of me. I got along with everyone, sand in public, read vivaciously. I was so happy. Then after the death of my father (he had depression) I became a recluse. I don't know if anyone in my class noticed this, but I became mean and sarcastic then. No longer the vivacious girl that ran around and sang in public, I kept on going on a ladder, and not up, but down. Now, in 7th grade, the beginning of new crushes, responsibility, freedom... but with the good comes the bad. Insecurities, depression, rejection-the feelings every girl experiences. This book, even just a sample that was only 15 pages, gave me a feeling of acception. Alot of people go through this. Buy this book. You will not regret it.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 18, 2010

    Understanding Teenage Girls

    The book, Reviving Ophelia talks about realy life stories of girls who goes through adolescence and how their attitude changes quickly and their behavior is unreadable. In the story, girls go to therapy and open up about their life and feelings to Mary Pipher. The girls struggling with many problems when they met high school and that's when everything changes. They starting drinking, smoking, have sex, and goingto parties. Their parents starts worriying about them and don't know what their daughters are thinking. So this book would be so helpful for parents to understand the difficulties their daughter is having. This book could relate to many people especially to the parents out there who are struggling to communicate with their daughters. I enjoy reading this book and I like how some of these girls could relate to me and reading others stories that are the opposite of my life.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2008

    Everyone should read this book

    Reviving Ophelia is definitely an eye opener. It talks about all the pressure being put on teenage girls today, and how severely it is effecting them. I think every parent should read this book, to learn how to help their daughters during difficult times. It touches on just about every subject; divorce, addiction, boyfriends, and even death. The stories are very relateable and true to life.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2008

    greatest work of mary pipher......a most read book

    Mary Pipher is a great psychologist.You know as i read her book--reviving ophelia, i was inspired, came to the point that i want to be like her. i want to help girls and women who encounter problems. I really love this book and i also recommend that parents should read it to.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2013

    SSOOOOOO GOOD!!!!

    NOOOOOOOOOOO! I DON'T HAVE ENOUGH MONEY! I just read the sample to this, and let me just say... it was amazing! Be open minded when you do read it though. My english teacher told me to read this because I, too, would like to become an adolescent psychologist! Today's teenagers need help, girls and boys. I've heard some of the things that people go through and I wish they could have help. I think if more people read this book, they'd understand teen girls in a less hypocritical way. Most people do look at girls as a weekness, even girls think other girls are! Whatever you do... Give this a chance! You wont regret it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2005

    I wish this book had been written while I was still in high school

    This book came out just shortly before I graduated from high school and I dearly wish that it had been written at least 5 years earlier as I(and many other girls) could have had an easier time of it during and after school. I read this book a few months ago(as a 27 year old) and it explained a lot of things to me including why I spent so many years in La La Land(survival technique) and why I became such an incredibly private person(another survival technique). Until recently I thought I was a basketcase as a teenager. Turns out I was one strong cookie getting through a hellish time in the healthiest way possible. I highly recommend that every girl and her parents read this book before high school.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2004

    A 'You're Not Alone' Book

    I am a psychology student at the university of Utah. I read this book as a junior in High School and was absolutely drawn in and amazed. Pipher explains the emotional struggle of real, everyday girls. These are not your typical 'That would never happen to me' experiences. Great for girls and parents of girls.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2003

    Valuable Read

    I read this book as a freshman in high school, too bad so late. My sister read it as a seventh grader and I wish both my parents had picked it up, too. It offers a surprisingly unbiased view at what teens have to go through everyday, not a nagging, parental view telling us not to do this or that. I'd recommend it for young teens and would ask their parents who read it to remember what their teen years were like, too.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2002

    I am saved

    Saving the Selves of Adolescent Girls is a huge understatement of what Reviving Ophelia by Dr. Mary Pipher can really do for society, parents, boys and not to mention, teenage girls. This book is full of deep emotion, feeling and a slight bit of understanding of what is inside the female part of the teenage culture today! Pipher explains what is behind the common teenage diseases today such as eating disorders, depression, and suicide. She gives real life cases of girls lost in societies grasp and not knowing what to do. The girls are so easy to relate to while understanding them is impossible to most. Pipher is brave at attempting to understand this culture and how society is so influential among women. She explains in simple terms how culture is killing the women developing inside an adolescent body. Pipher explains the reality of society and what will come of girls in the future if society does not soon understand what they are doing to kill the playful and colorful spirits inside adolescent girls. I have truly found myself in Reviving Ophelia and I don¿t understand how anyone can¿t!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2002

    This book changed my life-

    this book has changed my life. i learned that being a teenage girl isnt about bing pretty and looking like britney spears- just read it

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2001

    Excellent for Teenage Girls

    As a 17 year old girl from a small town in Vermont, I can relate to Pipher's book a lot. The pressures of a teenage girl these days are so much different then I have read years ago. Pipher's book really hit home base with many of the issues. Some of the stories I read about can happen to anyone, in fact I know many who are feeling the same way that live right here in my small little town. Anyone that is my age, I encourge you to read this book because you will get a good feel about how life as a teenage girl really is in the 21st century.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2001

    SAVED ME!!!!!!!!

    This book is truly not only a lifesaver, but a soul saver as well. I did not get my period until i turned 22, and this book helped me get through many a long day. i was searching for myself during my long 'pre-adolescent' years, and this book helped me find it. i am now a proud, content malaport. thank you, in a thousand lives and languages, thank you.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2001

    A Must for Parents with Daughters

    Reviving Ophelia is a must for all parents who have daugthers, and when the daughter is mature enough to read it, she should read it, too. If you're a parent who wants your daughter to develop good self-esteem in an age where the gender gap still exists on many levels, this book is for you. Reviving Ophelia may save you and your daughter from many of the common traps into which girls frequently fall during adolescence. Highly, highly recommended.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2001

    Ophelia rocks!

    THis book needs to be read by every parent of pre-teen girls, and boys for that matter. The author really describes the need for understanding from parents during this difficult age.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2000

    Loved It!!

    I have purchased many books on adolescents and this, by far, was the best and most insightful. It really guided me into understanding how teenage girls feel with the pressures of today and how much love and support they need through this trying time. I think that anyone with teenage girls would benefit from reading this book! I highly recommend it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2000

    Requred reading for anyone invovled with a teenage girl

    For all times I have stood in front of the mirror, peering at my self-consious body and wondering why I feel this way, I finally have an answer. This book brought great insight on how society really does have the mutilating hand in affecting young woman of today. Now I am encourged to not only make an effort to find my own self, but to encourage other teenage girls to do the same.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2000

    this book is the first step in helping all troubled adolescent girls all over the world

    this book is so incredible, i am a 17 year old girl, a senior in high school and i am in the process of reading this touching book-reviving ophelia has really hit home and made me realize that every girl has a set of problems of her own and there is no such thing as a popular, perfect girl. not even half way into the book and i'm realizing that all we need in our lives in love. the love of our peers and family. love definietly does conquer all!!! with love that is unconditional-we can overcome any obstacle that is placed in our path...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 13, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 30 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 2