Customer Reviews for

Rich Dad Poor Dad: What The Rich Teach Their Kids About Money - That The Poor And Middle Class Do Not!

Average Rating 4
( 499 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(279)

4 Star

(106)

3 Star

(45)

2 Star

(30)

1 Star

(39)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

18 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

Monetary success is within your reach

Rich Dad, Poor Dad explains the differences and distinctions between how the rich class, and the poor and middle classes manage their money. The author differentiate throughout the entire book explaining how his best friends dad, the "Rich Dad" was so successful. One of...
Rich Dad, Poor Dad explains the differences and distinctions between how the rich class, and the poor and middle classes manage their money. The author differentiate throughout the entire book explaining how his best friends dad, the "Rich Dad" was so successful. One of the main significances that were emphasized was "working hard" was different from "working and spending smart". For example, you can be the hardest worker in the building, but, if you are not smart on managing your money, you can have nothing to show for it. The Poor Dad is considered to be more government based, relying on other people to make monetary decisions, especially when it concerns taxes. The Rich Dad in more corporation based, being more proactive and finding ways to keep more of the money earned. This book explained economics in a way that was realistic and encouraging. The fact the author explained it in a way that anyone can follow his methods and be successful. It was able to keep my interest from the beginning to the end. It gave real world examples of how to manage my money and make smart investments to build my asset column. Before reading this book I had no knowledge or interest in starting to build an assets column at my age. This book gave me an understanding on what exactly determined an asset and how to start building a portfolio that could benefit me now and in the future. It is never too early to start. The most helpful thing that I gained from this book was to look at things as; a want versus a need. I realize that I have more wants than needs. Reading this book as a teenager has pointed me in the right direction of knowing what determines an asset and what determines a liability.

posted by 1143302 on March 23, 2009

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

10 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

It depends on who you are...

Robert Kiyosaki has lived with two dads. The poor dad, who was his biological father, went to the ivy league schools and received a doctorate degree, however, always ended up financially poor. The rich dad, was his friend's father, who only received education up to 8th ...
Robert Kiyosaki has lived with two dads. The poor dad, who was his biological father, went to the ivy league schools and received a doctorate degree, however, always ended up financially poor. The rich dad, was his friend's father, who only received education up to 8th grade, understood how to invest in money. He explains that it's all in the mental process. For instance, if job wages are low the common thought is--"I can't afford it" or "how can I afford it?" The poor dad would say he can't afford it, automatically shutting down his brain and accepting the state that he's in to save money. On the other hand, the rich dad tries to figure out a way to make more money and not dwell on the fact that the wages are small. This theme of differences in principals and financial methods is what continues on throughout the book. The common problem is that people in school are not taught about money. The average dad, also the poor dad, tells their children to work hard in school and get a steady job in a good company. In other words, he believes in the traditional ideas of working hard, preserving money, and not wasting it on material things, especially things he can't afford. The situation is that the poor dad was always more focused on education, rather than money, and commonly thinks "money doesn't matter". The poor dad also dwells on company insurance, security, and salary raises, instead of actually focusing on the job itself. This is what the rich dad calls the "Rat Race" in which one can never leave this cycle of being poor with this mindset. The rich dad did not spend time for education, but instead invested it on investing. The rich dad is seen as someone who learned to take risks, instead of not taking them, and by doing so, was able to have money work for him, instead of him work for money. I was shocked as to how much I was able to see these common thoughts portray in my life, and that my father fits perfectly under the category of a poor dad-- a common teacher, who loves to learn more but doesn't really like to focus on money, and constantly exclaims around the house, "we can't afford that". He also always focuses on insurance of our house, or our social security, or saving money. However, I may not live the glamorous life of having a rich father, I appreciate the rich life I live with his knowledge and determination to work hard, even if it still means to financially struggle with money. I am skeptical about not having an education, in the means to be able to become a rich dad, because I feel that without a root of knowledge then money takes over a family and have no real value. However, constantly dwelling on low wages, or in other words, to not be a pessimist, can always be a goal that families try to achieve. In the end, I found this to be book to be informative and maybe even life changing, but at the same time very unethical.

posted by Poordadrichlife on October 30, 2011

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 45 review with 3 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 3
  • Posted October 30, 2011

    It depends on who you are...

    Robert Kiyosaki has lived with two dads. The poor dad, who was his biological father, went to the ivy league schools and received a doctorate degree, however, always ended up financially poor. The rich dad, was his friend's father, who only received education up to 8th grade, understood how to invest in money. He explains that it's all in the mental process. For instance, if job wages are low the common thought is--"I can't afford it" or "how can I afford it?" The poor dad would say he can't afford it, automatically shutting down his brain and accepting the state that he's in to save money. On the other hand, the rich dad tries to figure out a way to make more money and not dwell on the fact that the wages are small. This theme of differences in principals and financial methods is what continues on throughout the book. The common problem is that people in school are not taught about money. The average dad, also the poor dad, tells their children to work hard in school and get a steady job in a good company. In other words, he believes in the traditional ideas of working hard, preserving money, and not wasting it on material things, especially things he can't afford. The situation is that the poor dad was always more focused on education, rather than money, and commonly thinks "money doesn't matter". The poor dad also dwells on company insurance, security, and salary raises, instead of actually focusing on the job itself. This is what the rich dad calls the "Rat Race" in which one can never leave this cycle of being poor with this mindset. The rich dad did not spend time for education, but instead invested it on investing. The rich dad is seen as someone who learned to take risks, instead of not taking them, and by doing so, was able to have money work for him, instead of him work for money. I was shocked as to how much I was able to see these common thoughts portray in my life, and that my father fits perfectly under the category of a poor dad-- a common teacher, who loves to learn more but doesn't really like to focus on money, and constantly exclaims around the house, "we can't afford that". He also always focuses on insurance of our house, or our social security, or saving money. However, I may not live the glamorous life of having a rich father, I appreciate the rich life I live with his knowledge and determination to work hard, even if it still means to financially struggle with money. I am skeptical about not having an education, in the means to be able to become a rich dad, because I feel that without a root of knowledge then money takes over a family and have no real value. However, constantly dwelling on low wages, or in other words, to not be a pessimist, can always be a goal that families try to achieve. In the end, I found this to be book to be informative and maybe even life changing, but at the same time very unethical.

    10 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 8, 2010

    its Okey

    Thesis: This books main idea is to tell the story of his life about his 2 parents: the rich dad and the poor dad. He shows that rich dads teach children about money and wealth and what the middle class or poor classes' dads do not teach to their children. He shows that you don't have to go to big schools and have a great education to be successful. Make money work for you, not work for money.
    Summary and analysis: This book is about Robert T. Kiyosakis' life, from childhood to adulthood. He was raised with a Rich dad, who was his best friends (Mike) dad, who was a large business owner, and a poor dad, his real biological father, who was poor and highly educated. Both fathers taught Kiyosaki different views on success but because he saw that Mikes' father was successful he chose to learn how to be successful from him (rich dad). This book shows you that anything is possible if you are fearless and open-minded and also shows the 6 major lessons for success: The rick don't work for money, The importance of financial literacy, mind your own business, Taxes and Corporations, The rich invent money, The need to work to learn and not to work for money. Kiyosaki states to never to work for money through out the book and shows that the rich when opportunities come and go the rich tend to take risks, wile the poor are too concern paying bills, fearful to make a risk, and too busy seeking wealth. This book shows the difference on how the rich class vs. the poor class look at money.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 6, 2011

    ehh

    this book for me told me a lot of stuff that i already knew. it has really good advice but it does not tell exactly how to do it. that is the only critique i have for this book. i liked how kiyosaki used pictograms in which helped me understand what he meant.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 16, 2014

    Great boo

    I've learned a lot

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2013

    Basic philosophy to building wealth

    It's real easy reading, I do recommend it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 27, 2012

    I thought this book was overall very repeating, but when it come

    I thought this book was overall very repeating, but when it comes to getting the author's point across, it did just that. It had helpful tips and ways to avoid problems when it comes to handling money in the future that I don't want to forget when I get to that point in my life. However, I do not think everybody will agree with Robert's viewpoints even though he made it seem like everybody should follow his guidelines if they want to end up truly rich and have money work for them instead of them working for money.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 7, 2010

    its alright

    This book was interesting at first because it began with the story of two young boys and two dads, but once it went into all the liability and assets it became kind of confusing. It was probably because I didn't take much of it seriously. Anyways, the fact that there was actually diagrams to help readers understand was convenient compared to other boring finacial books. It was an interesting book to read and when I become older and hold a stable job i will probably go back and re-read the book again. It is reliable, the fact that such a business man like Robert Kiyosaki took the time on writing this book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 9, 2010

    Some good nuggets about human nature.

    Some tid-bits to make you think differently about your career and how you view money. However, I sometimes felt like I was been sold a little bit of snake oil too. Some passages were poorly written or simply repeated over and over, to the point that I occasionally thought I accidentally pushed the page back button on my nook.

    I've read some criticisms of the book saying it's not practical or specific enough. I think it all depends on how to approach the book. If you come at it with an attitude of picking up a few good ideas or just finding a new way to think about life and money then you're sure to find that.

    Other critics have said that Kiyosaki is pushing a "get rich quick" scheme. I disagree. He clearly states (several times) that he is not pushing get rich quick.

    I would characterize his message as "don't blindly follow the crowd", "stick with it", "don't give up", and "never stop learning". All good advice, but not really novel. I think my grandparents would give the same advice.

    Bottom line, I'm not super impressed and at the same time I'm not utterly disappointed. It's a fairly easy and quick book to read, so I didn't feel like I wasted time with it. If you're looking for a more a practical resource book on personal finance then I highly recommend Dave Ramsey's, "Total Money Makeover".

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2009

    Interesting but boring!

    I had to read this book for a project for my Econ class, but it also taught me some valuable tips about making more money faster. Even though it was an interesting book, but it was also boring.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 28, 2009

    Interesting book to learn from

    Reading the book for my economics class i was surprised to learn that the book was actuallly interesting and had many good concepts on how one should live their lifes and spend their money wisely. Overall i enjoyed the book and recommend it to read on spare time.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 22, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    very organized and easy to read

    Rich Dad, Poor Dad is very simple to read and understand. It's helpful for those who are thinking of getting involved in bonds and stocks as well as real estate. There are guidelines to help you get started, but I'm not sure if they will actally work. This book written by Robert T. Kiyosaki focuses on his personal life from the time he was six years old. He writes about all of the information that his rich dad gives him as he's growing up as well as the little information that his poor dad gives him. Kiyosaki's poor dad is actually his real dad whom attended college and works extra hard for his money. His rich dad isn't his dad at all, but actually his friend's dad whom teaches them how to handle money and understand the different steps to becoming financially literate, in other words, to have money work for you, not you work for money. His rich dad agrees that you do not need an education to become successful. Ironically his "rich dad" dropped out of school at the age of thirteen and is now a very wealthy man with millions of dollars, while his real dad died with almost nothing. This whole book focuses on how the rich handle their money and how they invest it in bonds, stocks, real estate, and property which is the key to their success. Kiyosaki goes more in depth to reveal the steps on how to become financially literate so that your money works for you and not the other way around.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2008

    Interesting But Not Specific Enough

    Good tips on some financial advise although I wish it would have given a step by step plan for someone who is struggling to become financially successful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2008

    It's a start...

    This was the first book I read by Kiyosaki, and I thought that it was a good start, and that's about it. It's definitely motivational, and I think it provides a lot of good ideas. Unfortunately, he provides absolutely no help with how to turn those ideas into actions and ultimately money. This book was recommended to me by several people who are very successful, so I would assume there must be some merit to it, but if you're looking for something to take you by the hand and guide you through the process, this is not it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2007

    A Guide to Financial Success

    A book of basic principles which are sure to work for the 'material man.' People who know how to wield money to yield money know that they can also sell anything, even what they know. I find that amusing. That is the philosophy of making money and the material driven. The philosophy is simple: make up your mind and believe in yourself and be persistent and decisive. You can apply this philosophy to much more than material. Many have found this book to be very helpful. Trish New, author of The Thrill of Hope, South State Street Journal, and Memory Flatlined.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2007

    One time read.

    Decent book, although he says the exact same thing in every single book he's ever wrote. Very repetitive, and keep in mind that he's a business man, not a writer (if you catch my drift...) Great advice for those that want to invest in real estate and have a 'mentor'.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2007

    good starting book

    this book will really help you if you know absolutely nothing about investing. robert talks about how, instead of working for money, make money work for you. Sounds great right? well after telling you this in the beginning of the book, the rest of the book is mumbo jumbo. he does not talk about HOW exactly in what direction you should take in increasing your assets, whether stocks, real estate, rare gems etc. he just keeps repeating the same thing over and over and over and over again such as increase your asset collumn while limiting your liability and expense collumn... let me save you a few bucks if you never read this book. Good old Rob tells you how increasing your assets is very important and the typical work salary isn't enough. that's it. as stated, if you have no idea what investing is, then BORROW this book from someone you know. i do not recommend purchasing this book. there are tons of better books out there.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 8, 2005

    John-OSU

    I believe that while Kiyosaki does an excellent job of emphasizing the importance of financial literacy and gives much helpful information, I think he tends to oversimplify the process of gaining financial freedom. The author is a shining example how hard work and determination can get people anywhere in life. But I found myself, more often than not, noticing that sometimes in the book Kiyosaki made the goals so simple like infomercials on TV. All he says you have to do is follow some simple steps and you will reach financial freedom. He had many resources to jumpstart his career that the average citizen would not have access too. I enjoyed this book and I think Kiyosaki has many good ideas but I just think he tends to oversimplify the process of gaining financial freedom.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2004

    Good But I've Read Better

    This book is a somewhat good read and is very motivational, but it gives the impression to every dropout that they can be rich. Don't get me wrong, there are some successful dropouts and some unsuccessful graduates, but I think it's wise to say that knowledge is power and the more you know will help you make educated decisions. This book tells a good story but doesn't tell you how to get to the place of wealth with concrete advice. It basically tells you to work for yourself instead of working for someone else. It also gives you the benefits of working for yourself and having others work for you. It isn't as easy as it sounds. Most people who own their own business will tell you that they don't have their company, but that their company has them. I've recently read a book called Back On Track To Financial Freedom, By: Andrew Green, that walks you from a state of being broke to wealthy in only 40 or so pages. It's very realistic and gives a road map to success by using money that you didn't even know you had, to make you more money without quitting your job or risking your stability in the company you work at.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2004

    Good information but DON't Get dragged in

    I have read Robert Kiyosaki's Rich Dad poor dad. It is a good book. It does give you good insight about your finances and a different perspective. However, there are some inaccuracies. Such as Education does not matter because his 'rich Dad' is a 14 year old drop out millionare. However there is no positive ID of Rich Dad. Billionares have had education. Donald Trump Wharton Business school Finance major. Charles Schwab Standford MBA. Philip Knight Nike CEO U Illinois(can i spell?)MBA, Mayor Bloomberg Standford MBA, David Stern 1966 graduate of Columbia Law School. Many successful people stay in school or at least complete college.That is an inaccuracy of his book understating the importance of a school education. Also the book has promotions of his other products. Read this book for better insight of finance. But Do not give into the advertising or the nonsense that school is not important. Because one there is even no proof of Rich Dad's existence. Two Many of the people i've named are billionares and have at least a BA. They show the value of education and combined it with business depth to succeed. These days one needs to be educated. After all NOT every Dropout is a millionare.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2003

    Good information

    The book tells more what not to do that what to do. I agree a lot of information was repeated over and over. It did cover how spending habits cause people to stay poor. I own rentals and it did get me fired up do buy some more.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 45 review with 3 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 3