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Rich Dad Poor Dad: What The Rich Teach Their Kids About Money - That The Poor And Middle Class Do Not!

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

18 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

Monetary success is within your reach

Rich Dad, Poor Dad explains the differences and distinctions between how the rich class, and the poor and middle classes manage their money. The author differentiate throughout the entire book explaining how his best friends dad, the "Rich Dad" was so successful. One of...
Rich Dad, Poor Dad explains the differences and distinctions between how the rich class, and the poor and middle classes manage their money. The author differentiate throughout the entire book explaining how his best friends dad, the "Rich Dad" was so successful. One of the main significances that were emphasized was "working hard" was different from "working and spending smart". For example, you can be the hardest worker in the building, but, if you are not smart on managing your money, you can have nothing to show for it. The Poor Dad is considered to be more government based, relying on other people to make monetary decisions, especially when it concerns taxes. The Rich Dad in more corporation based, being more proactive and finding ways to keep more of the money earned. This book explained economics in a way that was realistic and encouraging. The fact the author explained it in a way that anyone can follow his methods and be successful. It was able to keep my interest from the beginning to the end. It gave real world examples of how to manage my money and make smart investments to build my asset column. Before reading this book I had no knowledge or interest in starting to build an assets column at my age. This book gave me an understanding on what exactly determined an asset and how to start building a portfolio that could benefit me now and in the future. It is never too early to start. The most helpful thing that I gained from this book was to look at things as; a want versus a need. I realize that I have more wants than needs. Reading this book as a teenager has pointed me in the right direction of knowing what determines an asset and what determines a liability.

posted by 1143302 on March 23, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

9 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

It depends on who you are...

Robert Kiyosaki has lived with two dads. The poor dad, who was his biological father, went to the ivy league schools and received a doctorate degree, however, always ended up financially poor. The rich dad, was his friend's father, who only received education up to 8th ...
Robert Kiyosaki has lived with two dads. The poor dad, who was his biological father, went to the ivy league schools and received a doctorate degree, however, always ended up financially poor. The rich dad, was his friend's father, who only received education up to 8th grade, understood how to invest in money. He explains that it's all in the mental process. For instance, if job wages are low the common thought is--"I can't afford it" or "how can I afford it?" The poor dad would say he can't afford it, automatically shutting down his brain and accepting the state that he's in to save money. On the other hand, the rich dad tries to figure out a way to make more money and not dwell on the fact that the wages are small. This theme of differences in principals and financial methods is what continues on throughout the book. The common problem is that people in school are not taught about money. The average dad, also the poor dad, tells their children to work hard in school and get a steady job in a good company. In other words, he believes in the traditional ideas of working hard, preserving money, and not wasting it on material things, especially things he can't afford. The situation is that the poor dad was always more focused on education, rather than money, and commonly thinks "money doesn't matter". The poor dad also dwells on company insurance, security, and salary raises, instead of actually focusing on the job itself. This is what the rich dad calls the "Rat Race" in which one can never leave this cycle of being poor with this mindset. The rich dad did not spend time for education, but instead invested it on investing. The rich dad is seen as someone who learned to take risks, instead of not taking them, and by doing so, was able to have money work for him, instead of him work for money. I was shocked as to how much I was able to see these common thoughts portray in my life, and that my father fits perfectly under the category of a poor dad-- a common teacher, who loves to learn more but doesn't really like to focus on money, and constantly exclaims around the house, "we can't afford that". He also always focuses on insurance of our house, or our social security, or saving money. However, I may not live the glamorous life of having a rich father, I appreciate the rich life I live with his knowledge and determination to work hard, even if it still means to financially struggle with money. I am skeptical about not having an education, in the means to be able to become a rich dad, because I feel that without a root of knowledge then money takes over a family and have no real value. However, constantly dwelling on low wages, or in other words, to not be a pessimist, can always be a goal that families try to achieve. In the end, I found this to be book to be informative and maybe even life changing, but at the same time very unethical.

posted by Poordadrichlife on October 30, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2009

    Monetary success is within your reach

    Rich Dad, Poor Dad explains the differences and distinctions between how the rich class, and the poor and middle classes manage their money. The author differentiate throughout the entire book explaining how his best friends dad, the "Rich Dad" was so successful. One of the main significances that were emphasized was "working hard" was different from "working and spending smart". For example, you can be the hardest worker in the building, but, if you are not smart on managing your money, you can have nothing to show for it. The Poor Dad is considered to be more government based, relying on other people to make monetary decisions, especially when it concerns taxes. The Rich Dad in more corporation based, being more proactive and finding ways to keep more of the money earned. This book explained economics in a way that was realistic and encouraging. The fact the author explained it in a way that anyone can follow his methods and be successful. It was able to keep my interest from the beginning to the end. It gave real world examples of how to manage my money and make smart investments to build my asset column. Before reading this book I had no knowledge or interest in starting to build an assets column at my age. This book gave me an understanding on what exactly determined an asset and how to start building a portfolio that could benefit me now and in the future. It is never too early to start. The most helpful thing that I gained from this book was to look at things as; a want versus a need. I realize that I have more wants than needs. Reading this book as a teenager has pointed me in the right direction of knowing what determines an asset and what determines a liability.

    18 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2009

    Good read

    Pretty good book to help get you started on a more financially intelligent future. Teaches some basic principles, but can often be vague. A lot of the book teaches the same basic rules over and over most likely to cram them into the reader's mind. I ocassionally got rather uncomfortable when he would recommend some illegitimate tactics to get ahead. Such as buying new cars and other things as "corporate expenses" and using his cat as his partner.

    -Ethan

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2013

    this was a good book that really stressed the importance of fina

    this was a good book that really stressed the importance of financial intelligence and it seems like a good stepping stone to find out more about making a living in different ways than just being employed by someone else. 

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 6, 2011

    must read

    This book is a great book to read if you are not looking for a difficult read. it is informative and interesting because the author uses his own real life examples.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2014

    Richard for nook friend

    Name is under fake name
    First name=marcel|last name=gomolio
    Email=(no perioeds except for u know wyere)t.r.a.c.k.i.s.e.c.t@g.m.a.i.l.c.o.m.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2013

    to me this book is helpful to anyone who needs to become a busin

    to me this book is helpful to anyone who needs to become a businessman.

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  • Posted March 30, 2012

    Good Book

    Had to read a book for my economics class, my dad loves this book so I decided to choose Rich Dad Poor Dad. It ended up to be intriguing, the way he uses examples from his life and the concept overall. Easy to read also.

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  • Posted March 28, 2012

    Inspirational, Motivational, and Accessible! (teen perspective)

    I've never been too excited to learn about economics. But let me tell you- this book has inspired and motivated me! When I started reading, I knew almost nothing about the subject. And I think that's one of the reasons I wasn't eager to learn--I didn't want to accept and confront my financial ignorance. So when I reached the section about how arrogance and fear are some of the leading factors preventing me from becoming rich, I was intrigued. Kiyosaki presents his information in clear, accessible chapters in a way that even I, a teenager with no previous knowledge in economics, could understand. And perhaps most importantly, I learned that by investing in assets rather than liabilities, I can still have time to do what I love. The anecdote that I most connected with was about a woman with a master's degree in English Literature who was offended when Kiyosaki suggested taking a course in sales/marketing to help her book sell better. I am now determined to overcome my economic ignorance!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 31, 2011

    Strongly Recommended - very informative

    This book taught a lot of different lessons that will give you the key to being rich. It was a fun read and was very interesting. The stories told about Kiyosaki in the begininng when he was first learning about money was enlightening. i do recommend this book and think everyone should check it out.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 8, 2009

    Information is applicable for anyone at most any adult age.

    This started off as a tool that our 22 year old son wanted to read through. It had been recommended to him to read, by someone he respects. He and a business partner both thought so highly of it, that they were recommending it to friends and family. It has worked its way through several generations of family and friends. There has been bountiful information and clear guidelines for everyone.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2009

    Good Book

    It is very helpful to understand money. Also it is easy to understand which is good because it is a lot more helpful with understanding money and how a person could work for it. It was not a hard book to read and it did not take too long. Another thing is that it was written in such a way that it was not like reading a book that you do not like and wanting to put it down after reading the first page but this book never made me feel like that. It was a good thing because it made me not board out of my mind and I really enjoyed reading it.

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  • Posted March 12, 2009

    In the results, what's more important is that I now know about money after all. For me, it really worked!

    "Poor Dad and Rich Dad" was advertised especially for those who are interested in Economics such as cash flow, and is recommended by economists. This book, written by Robert Kiyosaki, was primarily published "Rich Dad Poor Dad" as the first version years ago and soon brought Robert the glorious title, bestseller.
    I, long time ago, saw this first version in a shelf of my family's personal library and started reading it. Although it seemed so complicated to understand, I, who had always thought that I lacked the knowledge about money, kept reading it. At the moment, money was the only area I was interested in and wanted to know more about. However, it didn't last very long.
    I got tired when I read about half of the book. I guess I was too young to try the book. All the words were strange and unfamiliar and mostly they were difficult. What's worse, looking up the words and trying to understand them weren't favorable. I'd say the words did a good job to pull away my desire to know about money. Years have passed since then and recently, I found "Rich Dad Poor Dad: for teens" in one of the shelters of the school library. I thought it wouldn't harm me for giving it another shot, so I picked it up and started reading it. It was undoubtedly a wise decision.
    There were no such words and it was rather easy to understand. What's more, it showed us, the teens, how to make the "plans"(though I do not want to spoil what they are). However, it, in a way, requires some basic knowledge taught in the previous versions, for example, you should know what a "rat race" is in order to understand what the book says about the unstopping credit card payments. Also there still are some odd parts in the book.
    The book says "whether you are rich enough or not...." to bring up the idea that you may start with difference in wealth than people around you but you will do fine after all(if you only read the book), but when I actually looked into the book, things weren't quite simple like that. At least, to me, all the suggestions made seemed like only children from fine families could try (I chose not to explain about it specifically because this may bring up some disagreements from other readers).
    Except for this irony, which is personal, I believe "Rich Dad Poor Dad" told me a lot about the real world and I could get this much from the book maybe because I was and am now more prepared to read this type of book than before.
    In the results, what's more important is that I now know about money after all. For me, it really worked!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2009

    ...

    Pretty good for people that want to start to know how to handle your money the right way. Good for every individual, it is the kind of book that every individual would and will understand.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2008

    A Shortcut To the Education of Money Making

    Overall, I thought this was a interesting novel. It was very informative, along with being extremely organized by breaking down all of his main points into different steps. If you are interested in how to make money and increasing your income, I strongly recommend this novel. This easy read novel is well recommended to anyone-all ages; however, I do feel that it will be more beneficial to late teens/young adults or just adults in general. Even though it is very educational, maybe a middle school student or elementary school student might not find it helpful because they are not experienced with money situations because they are not old enough to work or let alone control their own money. But, even if you have no work experience, like myself, I still found this book very informative and it will become helpful in the long run. It gave me a good idea of what's important when it comes to financing, assets, liabilities, and more and furthermore, I think everyone should read it, at least at some point in their life time.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2008

    Average Joes guiide to financial freedom

    I thought that this books philosophies were very insightful. I teaches you to have power over your mind. Many people can never get to where they want to be because of how they see themselves financially. Most of the self doubt and fear that people have about making money come from how they were raised and past financial hardships. This book also gives great tips on investment your time and money into the correct things. This book teaches you that if you want to be rich you need to become the employer and not the employee. You need to make wise decisions so that you can have money work for you instead of working your whole life for a paycheck. This book provides great information that is helpful to anyone who ist not alredy aware of these ideas. The book is better that a 'how to' book because it is written in the form of a story which makes it entertaining. This valueable information can be used on a day to day baisis to help bring you to financail freedom.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2008

    Good information

    This is a great book for information, especially for the beginner in wealth growth. The book gives excellent depiction on what is needed to start growing your wealth portfolio and how the rich get ahead and why the poor (in this case, middle class) end up without true economic growth. The only area where the book could improve is in actually giving the steps to achieve wealth and not just the info.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2007

    Pick this book up today!

    Some people have liked this book, and seemingly one or 2 haven't (on the reviews). I really like it, and highly recommend it. It it written in a way that is pretty easy to follow along and enjoy---while also providing a pretty informative message about obtaining wealth. If you can't understand how to obtain wealth after reading this the first time---read it again!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2007

    Great Book

    Great book to read. I try to read anything I can about finance and this one is worth reading.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2007

    Extremely useful information

    Rich Dad Poor Dad is a book that should be a required read for all high school students. Robert Kiyosaki does an outstanding job breaking down the concept of money to its simplest form that anyone and everyone can fully understand. I have a hard time understanding the concept of liabilities and assets, etc.. but Robert Kiyosaki made it easy to follow and it really helped me understand.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2007

    Good place to start

    I'm 28 and I am not financially savvy. I decided I had better start some type of retirement fund for myself, but didn't know anything but the barest essentials. Not being the type to just blindly give my money to someone and hope they will do better than I would, I decided to educate myself. This book caught my eye and I'm glad it did because it turns out that it is a very simple way to understand where to begin. If you know little to nothing, like myself, I recommend it because it is 'dumbed-down'. There are no specifics on how to make money, but it illuminates subtle faults that we all have (and mostly don't even recognize) when it comes to assets, liabilities, thinking that 'it takes money to make money', and many others. The book won't earn me my first million, but it has sparked a voracious desire in me to learn how. If you are looking for a good place to start I think this is worth your money because it is a quick read that serves as a valuable guide.

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