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Riders of the Purple Sage: (Zane Grey Classics Collection)

Average Rating 4
( 72 )
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5 Star

(38)

4 Star

(11)

3 Star

(15)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(4)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

9 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

To "Do Your research first"

To "Do Your Reserach First" I say that YOU should do your research first into Mormon history before commenting on a novel that even Mormon historians and artists hail as a great work of American literature. I am a Mormon, a BYU graduate and a Mormon historians myself. E...
To "Do Your Reserach First" I say that YOU should do your research first into Mormon history before commenting on a novel that even Mormon historians and artists hail as a great work of American literature. I am a Mormon, a BYU graduate and a Mormon historians myself. Every point you made about 19th century Utah Mormon culture, church governments and history in your review below is incorrect. Obviously you are either an LDS convert or you've done little if any reserach into your own history. The so-called "Avenging Angels" (Danites) of Pioneer Utah WERE a reality. Bill Hickman and Porter Rockwell were among the most famous of them--and among the most famous (and violent) Gun fighters of the old West. You also seem to overlook that the portrayal of the Mormons in "Riders of the Purple Sage" is mostly positive. The heroin IS a Mormon and REMAINS a Mormon. Since the novel is set in 1870's Utah where 99% of the population was Mormon, it makes complete sense that both the "Good guys" and the "bad guys" in the novel should BOTH be Mormons. When I attended Brigham Young University in the 1980s and took a class in Mormon Literature, "Riders of the Purple Sage" was required reading.
Zane Grey spent a great deal of his life living in "Mormon Country" (the Rocky Mountain states where Mormons then made up the majority of the population.) He knew what he was writing about.

Now for everyone else reading this: If you want to know the origin of the Western novel read "Riders of the Pruple Sage." It is THE book that created the genre. (And other Mormons should be proud that the FIRST American Western is a Mormon story. Mormons were--after all--the first white Americans to settle in the western states.)

posted by dec0558 on January 8, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

Wrong!

The type on this version is too small. When I bumped the font size up one notch it was then too big. I don't recommend this version. Buy the $0.99 version instead.

posted by wroberthelms on April 22, 2011

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  • Posted April 22, 2011

    Wrong!

    The type on this version is too small. When I bumped the font size up one notch it was then too big.

    I don't recommend this version. Buy the $0.99 version instead.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2003

    Do your research first!

    This book is absolutely appalling in its reckless villanization of the Mormons. Not everyone is perfect, and there have been groups of Mormons (mostly EXCOMMUNICATED ones) who might fit these descriptions, but this is just irresponsible writing. Only the missionaries are habitually called `Elder` and they are young men forbidden even to be in a room alone with a woman during the time of their mission. This `Elder Trull` is pure baloney dreamed up by Zane Grey for sensationalist purposes. Read it if you want, but take the characters with a block or two of salt.

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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