Customer Reviews for

The Ripple Effect: The Fate of Fresh Water in the Twenty-First Century

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2012

    Moonkit's Review

    "Reall y good. I usually do not like short chapters... but I like your story so far."

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 4, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    The conventional wisdom about freshwater, at least in the afflue

    The conventional wisdom about freshwater, at least in the affluent West, is hopelessly clouded by how easy it is to use all the water you want by simply turning on the tap. Alex Prud’homme, a longtime magazine journalist, says the days of reliable plenty are in jeopardy. He meticulously lays out the unpleasant facts, covering rampant pollution, moneyed interests seizing control of public resources, growing scarcity amid booming populations, and looming megafloods thanks to global warming. The book’s strength lies in the portraits of the real people at the center of these topics, and that personal touch helps keep a tiny flame of optimism alive that these problems are ultimately human in scale and fixable. This facet is also a weakness in that the book reads like a series of earnest, long-form radio reports – dispatches that push a bony finger onto the pessimism button. Yet this important book stands a better chance than most of moving good people and governments into action. getAbstract recommends it to green-minded industrialists, urban planners, big-vision lawmakers, future-focused engineers, technological innovators and anyone who wants to understand why that plastic bottle of water really isn’t the answer.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 5, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Great read for those interested about the future of our water

    I'm only 1/4 the way through the book and already have read so many jaw-dropping details about how water is treated in America. I hope the trends that are highlighted at the end of the book are not perpetuated for any extended period of time. It so, that could spell doom for us Americans. The author eloquently and realistically tells it like it is. This book is a must read for any environmentalist, public health professional, or scientist.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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