Customer Reviews for

Roanoke: Solving the Mystery of the Lost Colony

Average Rating 3.5
( 5 )
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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2002

    Good research, strange choice of writing style.

    I was disappointed by this book because I found Lee Miller's writing style very difficult to read. She chooses to relate the narrative of the Roanoke colony as if she were relating the story out loud, hence the narrative is told in the present tense, peppered with incomplete sentences, a strange use of italics rather than quotes, and annoying ellipses...as if to suggest...one was reading a detective novel rather than nonfiction history. It made for very slow and often frustrating reading.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2014

    I read this on the basis of an NPR interview-review. Ms. Miller

    I read this on the basis of an NPR interview-review. Ms. Miller uncovered important new documents on the subject from the UK. However the work shows a serious lack of historical discipline. She needs to have studied or consulted more with historians. She uncritically accepts documents from the Inquisition that are known forgeries, and she also uncritically incorporates speculations about Native American copper-ore mining and smelting in the Carolinas, for which there is no generally accepted evidence. The very final lines of her text most likely do indicate the ultimate fate of any survivors; assimilation in the native population.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2013

    Fascinating!

    Ever since I heard of the disappearance of the colonists at Roanoke, I have been curious about what might have happened. That is what caught my interest. I saw this book in a Barnes and Noble store and began reading it on my Nook while I was there. Soon, I was hooked.

    I've read several historical works about the Elizabethan Era, but this one is unique. The author explores how the people and their activities relate to various developments from each point of view. The author is investigating the disappearance as if it was a crime, not simply a tragedy.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2007

    it was okay

    The first couple of chapters were very interesting. I liked how she started out writing about Roanoke and in the end how she stated her theory. But I thought the middle of the book was utterly boring- mainly because no one cares about Raleigh or any of the other highly important people of the monarchy that have nothing to do with Roanoke. I do like her research on the subject, but frankly, there was just way too many descriptive words than necessary. I also do not completely agree with her theory. I do not know how she came up with all the theories like she did, when there was absolutely nothing there when White returned to Roanoke to rescue the colonists.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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