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Roots: The Saga of an American Family (30th Anniversary Edition)

Average Rating 4.5
( 153 )
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5 Star

(113)

4 Star

(19)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(9)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

14 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

A Fantastic Account, truly an outstanding book

As a young girl I remember sitting in front of the television with my family to watch Roots when it had been made into a series. Over the years I have often wanted to read the book and find all the missing parts that the limited series had left out. I am so very glad ...
As a young girl I remember sitting in front of the television with my family to watch Roots when it had been made into a series. Over the years I have often wanted to read the book and find all the missing parts that the limited series had left out. I am so very glad that I did. The author took me to a time when human slavery was a common place, and allowed me to feel the attrocities that took place during that time. I felt the pain, love and courage of the people and was very glad to be transported to a era that has long been forgotten and should never be. If you would like to read a book that is a fantastic read as well as a eye opening experience, read this book.

posted by Star_Dreamer on May 16, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

7 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

'Rooting' Out Plagiarism and Fact from Fiction

Although Haley was obviously a great story-teller, it is important that readers understand that 'Roots' is just that -- a story. It is NOT history, it is not factual, it is fiction. This is all the more important because 'Roots' was originally published in '76 as 'non-...
Although Haley was obviously a great story-teller, it is important that readers understand that 'Roots' is just that -- a story. It is NOT history, it is not factual, it is fiction. This is all the more important because 'Roots' was originally published in '76 as 'non-fiction' - a very irresponsible editor's choice indeed. According to the Village Voice ('Alex Haley's Hoax' Feb. 23, 1993), 'Haley invented 200 years of family history.' Before his death, Haley admitted that he 'was just trying to give [his] people a myth to live by.' Even the little unspoiled village of Juffure where Kunta Kinte allegedly lived, was in actuality a thriving slave-trading post and its resident Africans themselves captured and sold other Africans into slavery. Not only was Haley guilty of 'genealogical creativity,' he was also a talented and admitted plagiarist. He copied copiously from a 1967 novel about slavery by Harold Courlander entitled 'The African,' as well as excerpts from 'Travels of Mungo Park' and 'The Story of Phillis Wheatley.' You decide, is a lie still a lie even when it's told with good intentions? And should we be concerned that yet another generation, 25 years later, will either read this book or watch an 8-hour TV mini-series thinking it is authentic historical drama?

posted by Anonymous on January 17, 2002

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2002

    'Rooting' Out Plagiarism and Fact from Fiction

    Although Haley was obviously a great story-teller, it is important that readers understand that 'Roots' is just that -- a story. It is NOT history, it is not factual, it is fiction. This is all the more important because 'Roots' was originally published in '76 as 'non-fiction' - a very irresponsible editor's choice indeed. According to the Village Voice ('Alex Haley's Hoax' Feb. 23, 1993), 'Haley invented 200 years of family history.' Before his death, Haley admitted that he 'was just trying to give [his] people a myth to live by.' Even the little unspoiled village of Juffure where Kunta Kinte allegedly lived, was in actuality a thriving slave-trading post and its resident Africans themselves captured and sold other Africans into slavery. Not only was Haley guilty of 'genealogical creativity,' he was also a talented and admitted plagiarist. He copied copiously from a 1967 novel about slavery by Harold Courlander entitled 'The African,' as well as excerpts from 'Travels of Mungo Park' and 'The Story of Phillis Wheatley.' You decide, is a lie still a lie even when it's told with good intentions? And should we be concerned that yet another generation, 25 years later, will either read this book or watch an 8-hour TV mini-series thinking it is authentic historical drama?

    7 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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    Posted September 29, 2013

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    Posted September 24, 2011

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    Posted May 7, 2011

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    Posted August 6, 2012

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