Customer Reviews for

The Rule of Nine (Paul Madriani Series #11)

Average Rating 3.5
( 79 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

exciting thriller

The events in nearby Coronado are nuked into every cell of his brain as San Diego based attorney Paul Madriani still reels from the near tragedy (see Guardian of Lies). The near nuclear disaster has him looking at the bigger picture of terrorism. The FBI warns Madrian...
The events in nearby Coronado are nuked into every cell of his brain as San Diego based attorney Paul Madriani still reels from the near tragedy (see Guardian of Lies). The near nuclear disaster has him looking at the bigger picture of terrorism. The FBI warns Madriani to keep his mouth shut or face a lifetime locked away in a place he never heard of under the Patriot Act enforcement. On the other hand weapons expert Joselyn Cole demands he go public so a repeat can be averted.

While Madriani struggles with coping and what to do, an aging 1960s radical believes the time has come to destroy the DC right wing government-industrial complex. This former member of the Students for a Democratic Society expects to die like a Middle Eastern suicide bomber and unlike the cowardly western right wing terrorists who kill people from a safe distance. The plan will make 9/11 look like a minor incident and the first deadly steps come from the American right wing form of terrorism.

The Feds tie Madriani to a murder of a DC staffer as law enforcement believes "the Mexicutioner" Liquida assassin is the killer. Madriani rusticates with his family as he and Cole fear the Feds are missing the big picture again as they believe two insane murderers, the ancient Weatherman and the Mexicutioner have joined forces in what apparently involves the mysterious deadly "Rule of Nine" gamut.

This is an exciting over the top of the Washington Monument thriller that grips the audience from the onset and never let's go until the final dramatic confrontation. The story line is action, action, and more action that will have Madriani fans salivating for another superheavyweight bout starring the Southern California lawyer and his sidekick Cole vs. archenemy Liquida; that is if everyone rides away from this round.

Harriet Klausner

posted by harstan on April 30, 2010

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

Left @ gate!

Pretty fair read until being left to wonder @ end! Liked the character in the court room more than this chase all over the globe!

posted by BigGuyKTL on April 11, 2011

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  • Posted April 30, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    exciting thriller

    The events in nearby Coronado are nuked into every cell of his brain as San Diego based attorney Paul Madriani still reels from the near tragedy (see Guardian of Lies). The near nuclear disaster has him looking at the bigger picture of terrorism. The FBI warns Madriani to keep his mouth shut or face a lifetime locked away in a place he never heard of under the Patriot Act enforcement. On the other hand weapons expert Joselyn Cole demands he go public so a repeat can be averted.

    While Madriani struggles with coping and what to do, an aging 1960s radical believes the time has come to destroy the DC right wing government-industrial complex. This former member of the Students for a Democratic Society expects to die like a Middle Eastern suicide bomber and unlike the cowardly western right wing terrorists who kill people from a safe distance. The plan will make 9/11 look like a minor incident and the first deadly steps come from the American right wing form of terrorism.

    The Feds tie Madriani to a murder of a DC staffer as law enforcement believes "the Mexicutioner" Liquida assassin is the killer. Madriani rusticates with his family as he and Cole fear the Feds are missing the big picture again as they believe two insane murderers, the ancient Weatherman and the Mexicutioner have joined forces in what apparently involves the mysterious deadly "Rule of Nine" gamut.

    This is an exciting over the top of the Washington Monument thriller that grips the audience from the onset and never let's go until the final dramatic confrontation. The story line is action, action, and more action that will have Madriani fans salivating for another superheavyweight bout starring the Southern California lawyer and his sidekick Cole vs. archenemy Liquida; that is if everyone rides away from this round.

    Harriet Klausner

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 22, 2010

    ...page turner..

    Outstanding in all aspects of an off beat legal thriller, that is, no couttroom.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2010

    One of the best I've read lately.

    Loved the timeliness of the issues. I definitely think he [Martini] has found the country's weakness at this time. I wish every elected official would read it and see how our inability to compromise could easily be the our nation's downfall.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 11, 2011

    Left @ gate!

    Pretty fair read until being left to wonder @ end!
    Liked the character in the court room more than this
    chase all over the globe!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 16, 2010

    Gelati's Scoop

    I love Martini's Paul Madriani novels. Each one was thoroughly enjoyed and I can say I look forward to each new installment with a great deal of anticipation. Martini's cast of characters also includes Harry Hinds, Madriani's law partner and Herman Diggs their investigator. The Rule of Nine picks up where Guardian of Lies ends. If you remember in the last installment of the series, our group of smart aleck characters foiled an attempted bombing of the nuclear nature on American soil in San Diego. Their unfriend, Liquida, the hired assassin known as "the Mexicutioner" is very unhappy with all that Madriani and company has undone. Here we go then , right into , The Rule Of Nine.
    Steve Martini adds a few new elements into this newest novel and I for one am thankful for the new characters and directions with them. He has penned a number of New York Times Best sellers and could easily sit on his hands and mail it in, but he didn't; he took it to a new level for me. Many novels fit into this genre, but I am going to say he is definitely one of my favorites for all the right reasons. He puts together a very good concise plotline and lets his characters drive the story to a very nice well tied together ending. There are no special gadgets used, no big time surprises whipped out of pocket from left field to carry this home, just good, fundamental storytelling that is enjoyable to read. One point I would make on this though, is that I enjoy these characters best in their natural habitat, the courtroom. I know that sounds odd coming from me. I think this solid cast shines the most when hunting down a good legal drama, not terrorists and nukes, maybe next time.
    The Rule of Nine is a good new chapter in the life and times of Paul Madriani and company. If this is your first crack at the characters, there is no major letdown and you don't feel that you have missed too much by starting now; he is not really in his natural environment. Martini makes you feel like you are just getting acquainted with some friends you haven't seen in a while. Come on in and enjoy, you can catch up on things later; let's get to what is new now. I don't hesitate to say give this novel and its backlog of stories a go, put this in your Goodreads - to read- list if you are busy now and enjoy a new character driven series by one of the giants in the genre.
    What are you reading today? Check us out and become our friend on Facebook & Linkedin. Go to Goodreads and become our friend there and suggest books for us to read and post on. You can also follow us on Twitter, and the Gelati's Scoop Facebook Fan Page. Did you know you can shop directly on Amazon by clicking the Gelati's Store Tab on our blog? Thanks for stopping by today; We will see you tomorrow. Have a great day. http://www.gelatisscoop.blogspot.com

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 17, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    AN ARTICULATE, COMPELLING VOICE PERFORMANCE BY DAN WOREN

    American born voice actor Dan Woren is a versatile performer who has adroitly read everything from the Tortoise in Aesop's Fables to a large assortment of video games to countless audio books. With The Rule Of Nine he perfectly captures the drive, terror, and menace found in the character's voices. The result is super pleasurable listening to this frightening, all-too-possible scenario.

    Every bit what we hoped it would be and more following NY Times bestseller Guardian Of Lies Steve Martini gives us another explosive thriller featuring California lawyer Paul Madriani. Now, how an attorney manages to get himself, family, and friends into such deadly situations is another story, but here he is fighting for his life on every page of THE RULE OF NINE.

    No one wants to make an enemy of Liquida Muerte aka "the Mexicutioner," a hired assassin who takes great pleasure in dispatching his victims as painfully as possible. But Madriani once infuriated him and Liquida never forgets. He not only wants to get Madriani but also his daughter, Sarah. Liquida first tries to do this by making it look like Madriani had something to do with the murder of a young congressional aide, Jimmie Snyder. Unfortunately, Jimmie had only been on the job for two months when he made his fatal error by trusting a fellow who was "affable, approachable, and interested.....All the man wanted was to see a few of the rooms off-limits to the public." That one apparently small mistake not only cost him his life but also almost destroyed the entire Supreme Court.

    A brilliant terrorist whom we know only as Thorn is hellbent on destruction at the heart of America and is using Liquida to help him make his plot a reality. With powerful friends and unlimited funds it's not at all unreasonable to think that Thorn might be successful.

    Although still somewhat off-base after helping to stop a nuclear explosion at the Naval base in Coronado, Madriani realizes that law enforcement isn't seeing the full picture or realizing the imminent danger. After hiding Sarah away for her safety he and his associate Herman Diggs along with a beauteous, persistent arms control activist, Jocelyn Cole set out to do some sleuthing of their own.

    There's not a dull sentence on any page as a suicide bomber speeds towards its target. Not only has Martini delivered a can't-stop-listenting to thriller but closes with a shocking finish that leaves us on tinder hooks waiting for more.

    - Gail Cooke

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 23, 2014

    Highly recommended

    A great book. Lots of twist and turns.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2013

    UGH by Ml

    What a disapppointment. I usef to love reading Madriai. Wow has he gone off rhe rails. Totally out of control and not at all believable. H e has us all over the place. Think i am now done. Sorry but good bye Martini

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 27, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Not Following The Rules

    It's become a commonplace thriller these days. Bad guys with bombs threaten this or that city, and not one of our government agencies is up to the job of solving the case. It takes good old civilians to do the job, accomplishing things that the military or the CIA or the Secret Service or the FBI, with all the assets at their command, cannot handle. It's Jane or John Doe who can do it, and they must, in the nick of time, to save the world or whatever is threatened in this particular novel. In the Rule of Nine it is a lawyer from San Diego who must unravel a horrible plot. The government proves unbelieving, ineffectual, disinterested. So, the lawyer and a couple of helpers travel the country, discovering secrets that will lead them, and only them, to a point where they can save...in this case, a government building in Washington, D.C.

    Many of these novels that I mention actually keep up an interesting level of suspense and give their civilian saviors a level of charisma. We want to root for them, and we can suspend belief long enough to enjoy the novel. Unfortunately, The Rule of Nine does none of this. It is such a stupid story that the reader never once believes anything is in real danger, and there were numerous points where I just glazed over the pages as I was so bored.This is not the book you want to take to the beach.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 20, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    ANOTHER EXPLOSIVE THRILLER FROM STEVE MARTINI

    Every bit what we hoped it would be and more following NY Times bestseller Guardian Of Lies Steve Martini gives us another explosive thriller featuring California lawyer Paul Madriani. Now, how an attorney manages to get himself, family, and friends into such deadly situations is another story, but here he is fighting for his life on every page of THE RULE OF NINE.

    No one wants to make an enemy of Liquida Muerte aka "the Mexicutioner," a hired assassin who takes great pleasure in dispatching his victims as painfully as possible. But Madriani once infuriated him and Liquida never forgets. He not only wants to get Madriani but also his daughter, Sarah. Liquida first tries to do this by making it look like Madriani had something to do with the murder of a young congressional aide, Jimmie Snyder. Unfortunately, Jimmie had only been on the job for two months when he made his fatal error by trusting a fellow who was "affable, approachable, and interested.....All the man wanted was to see a few of the rooms off-limits to the public." That one apparently small mistake not only cost him his life but also almost destroyed the entire Supreme Court.

    A brilliant terrorist whom we know only as Thorn is hellbent on destruction at the heart of America and is using Liquida to help him make his plot a reality. With powerful friends and unlimited funds it's not at all unreasonable to think that Thorn might be successful.

    Although still somewhat off-base after helping to stop a nuclear explosion at the Naval base in Coronado, Madriani realizes that law enforcement isn't seeing the full picture or realizing the imminent danger. After hiding Sarh away for her safety he and his associate Herman Diggs along with a beauteous, persistent arms control activist, Jocelyn Cole set out to do some sleuthing of their own.

    There's not a dull sentence on any page as a suicide bomber speeds towards its target. Not only has Martini delivered a can't-stop-reading thriller but closes with a shocking finish that leaves us on tinder hooks waiting for more.

    - Gail Cooke

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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