Customer Reviews for

Scribbling the Cat: Travels with an African Soldier

Average Rating 4.5
( 28 )
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(21)

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Sort by: Showing 21 – 29 of 29 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2014

    Velvetstar to Horseclan- The Warriors of Horseclan

    (Finish reading before adding your description) <p> This is for the *Warriors* of Horseclan to post their cats information. Include your appearance, personality traits, relationship status, other family ties, likes and dislikes if you want, and maybe a brief history. Queens can post the descriptions of their kits at 'Velvet Glass' result one, and they can stay there while they are apprentices and until they are warrior's. If your looking to roleplay a kit, then check there for open kits and ask at our main camp. I will post here every time we move so our latest camp and other important information can be easily found, so if you new joining or an old member trying to track us down, check my post with the Headline "Horseclan Camp & Territory Location" <br>
    If you're new and haven't been excepted yet, please go to our Main Camp and wait until your warrior ceremony to add your description. (Of course this is still just for cats with warrior names) Welcome to Horseclan! -Velvetstar-

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  • Posted February 20, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    recommended, but not for the squeamish

    unlike her first engrossing memoir of growing up a white child in Africa, the author expresses more emotion and opinion in this tale of a journey thru old war zones with an ex-Rhodesian soldier. insightful though not comprehensive look at post-colonial Africa, the main story is her travelling companion's edgey mental state, that connects with our current American vets struggling with PTSD. In a chilling scene, the author is sharing sleeping quarters with 3 former soldiers, and is awakened repeatedly when each and all of them scream out in the night from war terrors 20 years old. I'm looking forward to reading her third and newst book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 19, 2004

    Not up to Expectations

    One has to wonder about Fuller's true motivations for becoming so intimately involved with such an unappealing character as 'K' and his violent,low life cronies. Ostensibly, she is embarking on a voyage of discovery in order to experience first hand the aftermath of a long and brutal war and the lasting effect on its survivors but the question that must be on the mind of every reader is why would she (who professes to have a close attachment to her children, if not her husband), embark on such a hazardous undertaking and place herself in such a vulnerable environment in order to gain some insight into these hopeless and basically uninteresting characters, whose vocabulary is largely limited to four letter expletives. This is a legitimate question because the story is as much (or moreso) about her than the characters she encounters and the places she visits but she never really gives any insight into her personal life as she so freely did in 'Don't Lets Go To The Dogs Tonight'. Was the real reason for her odyssey romance, impulse, adventure, escape or, truly, research as she would have us believe. The reader is given no clue and is left wondering -'why'? Fuller's prose is wonderful but the dialogue in this story seems stilted and does not flow as it did in 'Dogs'. In this reader's opinion,'Scribbling' does not live up to the considerable promise of her first book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2004

    Richly painted, haunting, humorous and timely

    Satisfying and captivating. This is a haunting, yet beautifully textured, continuation of Fuller's younger life memoired in 'Don't Let's Go to The Dog's Tonight'. After skimming over seven years of living the fat life in the US she's drawn back to the raw life of her African childhood to research the wars which raged on around her youth. She encounters soldiers reluctant to reveal the realities of being a warrior, including her father. Bo's faced with a new understanding of her own history, the people she's left behind and of the war torn Africa (specifically former Rhodesia and Mozambique) that was beyond understanding as a child. Though this isn't meant to be a history lesson in itself, however, it's timely; considering the HIV epidemic and the many conflicts currently raging round the globe, the attitudes of those that start wars, and how wars effect so many for so long. Her travels are written with the eyes of a painter along with humerous, soulful, philosophical observations of what it is to be human here on earth. It's all here; love and longing, fear and hatred, courage and bravado, depression and abuse, faith and endurance, peace and tranquilty: and advice from Alexadra Fuller's father, 'Don't look back so much or you'll get wiped out on the tree in front of you'. We're left wondering if Fuller has learned the lessons from her travels with a soldier that are obvious to the reader regarding accountability and volnerabilty. I missed the unapologetic observations she's famous for regarding her view of her role in this journey. Fuller finds herself, however, unapologetically halfway around the world from her husband and children with some pretty questionable characters and claims she is the same person she was at the beginning of her travels. I loved this book but I can't help but feel it's a memoir written too close to real time to be completely told. I'm not sure if she hit the tree or not but maybe that was her intention. Read it and decide.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2009

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    Posted June 10, 2009

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    Posted June 8, 2009

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    Posted October 7, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2011

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