Customer Reviews for

Secrets of the Millionaire Mind: Mastering the Inner Game of Wealth

Average Rating 4
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(57)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

Changed My Mind and My Life

I bought this book because it was on a reading list from a yoga studio. The fact that a book about money was on a yoga reading list immediately intrigued me. Let me just say that this book totally changed my thoughts about money. It forced me to expose (to myself) th...
I bought this book because it was on a reading list from a yoga studio. The fact that a book about money was on a yoga reading list immediately intrigued me. Let me just say that this book totally changed my thoughts about money. It forced me to expose (to myself) the deeply ingrained ideas I had about money that I acquired from my family. For the first time in my life, I realized that what I thought about money just wasn't true. I learned that I could change my perception of money. This shift in my thinking was a pivotal event for me that led from my being a school teaching to owning my own business. I am so grateful for this book. Eker's seminars are outstanding as well. Just like his book, he forces you to look at your habits and thoughts. No hiding out in your comfort zone (so that's the link with yoga!)
Mira Jacquin
www.philippejacquin.com

posted by Loving_LifeMJ on March 14, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

Bad Advice for the Intended Readership

I can¿t remember ever reading a book so full of contradiction and nonsense. This author is so typical of what our society deifies today. He is also a product of deception, taking advantage of those who are less fortunate, offering magical chants and thoughts that are ...
I can¿t remember ever reading a book so full of contradiction and nonsense. This author is so typical of what our society deifies today. He is also a product of deception, taking advantage of those who are less fortunate, offering magical chants and thoughts that are supposed to turn things around financially for everyone. I was aghast at how, through the pages, the author essentially calls his readers idiots unless they heed his advice, which is followed every few pages by an ad for his rather expensive seminars. I was amused at the author¿s advice for his readers to start saving their change, telling them that if they do this, eventually they will become rich. At one point, the author advises saving just a dollar a month, and tells his readers that they will have $2,048 in one year. I read this section twice, trying to figure out what kind of math formulas the author was using to figure this out. The author creates his own religion throughout the book, asking his readers every few pages to place their hands on their hearts and then their heads, and start chanting. Misleading and deceptive throughout, the author tells his readers that by simply establishing a state of mind, they can become rich. Later, he contradicts himself by telling his readers that they need to work toward this goal. At one point, he simply says that if one wants to be rich, he or she should buy real estate. He gives no plan for someone who has no money to do this, but suggests that everyone do it as much as they can. The author tells his readers that in order to get rich, they need to invest their money, but doesn¿t seem to consider those who, as he labels them, are ¿broke.¿ How does someone with no money invest money? He insults poor people by writing that the only thing they are is ¿poor!¿ I can go on and on about this author, but we have seen him recycled so many times over, it would be a waste of time. If you want to be rich, work hard, save your money, and invest wisely. Listening to some charlatan won¿t do a thing for you except amuse you slightly. In the later pages, the author invites his readers to come to a seminar for free along with a companion by bringing the invitation on the page and the proof of purchase for the book. Again, the author doesn¿t take into consideration here his primary readership: the poor, who might be buying the book at a discount on eBay or Yahoo or from some other source second-hand. With no proof-of-purchase at the full price, these readers will not be able to gain access to the seminar. But here¿s the main thing to observe: If the author¿s main objective is to help poor people get rich, why is he charging them the $19.95 for the book in the first place? The answer to that is obvious: To make himself richer by taking advantage of the very people he claims he wants to make rich. Personally, I didn¿t pay a cent for this book, and never would! The ironic thing is that the book was recommended to me in early 2005 by a security guard, who, in late 2005, is still a security guard. I can go on and on about this author, but we have seen him recycled so many times over, it would be a waste of time. If you want to be rich, work hard, save your money, and invest wisely. Reading the words of some charlatan won¿t do a thing for you except amuse you slightly.

posted by Anonymous on September 26, 2005

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 26, 2005

    Bad Advice for the Intended Readership

    I can¿t remember ever reading a book so full of contradiction and nonsense. This author is so typical of what our society deifies today. He is also a product of deception, taking advantage of those who are less fortunate, offering magical chants and thoughts that are supposed to turn things around financially for everyone. I was aghast at how, through the pages, the author essentially calls his readers idiots unless they heed his advice, which is followed every few pages by an ad for his rather expensive seminars. I was amused at the author¿s advice for his readers to start saving their change, telling them that if they do this, eventually they will become rich. At one point, the author advises saving just a dollar a month, and tells his readers that they will have $2,048 in one year. I read this section twice, trying to figure out what kind of math formulas the author was using to figure this out. The author creates his own religion throughout the book, asking his readers every few pages to place their hands on their hearts and then their heads, and start chanting. Misleading and deceptive throughout, the author tells his readers that by simply establishing a state of mind, they can become rich. Later, he contradicts himself by telling his readers that they need to work toward this goal. At one point, he simply says that if one wants to be rich, he or she should buy real estate. He gives no plan for someone who has no money to do this, but suggests that everyone do it as much as they can. The author tells his readers that in order to get rich, they need to invest their money, but doesn¿t seem to consider those who, as he labels them, are ¿broke.¿ How does someone with no money invest money? He insults poor people by writing that the only thing they are is ¿poor!¿ I can go on and on about this author, but we have seen him recycled so many times over, it would be a waste of time. If you want to be rich, work hard, save your money, and invest wisely. Listening to some charlatan won¿t do a thing for you except amuse you slightly. In the later pages, the author invites his readers to come to a seminar for free along with a companion by bringing the invitation on the page and the proof of purchase for the book. Again, the author doesn¿t take into consideration here his primary readership: the poor, who might be buying the book at a discount on eBay or Yahoo or from some other source second-hand. With no proof-of-purchase at the full price, these readers will not be able to gain access to the seminar. But here¿s the main thing to observe: If the author¿s main objective is to help poor people get rich, why is he charging them the $19.95 for the book in the first place? The answer to that is obvious: To make himself richer by taking advantage of the very people he claims he wants to make rich. Personally, I didn¿t pay a cent for this book, and never would! The ironic thing is that the book was recommended to me in early 2005 by a security guard, who, in late 2005, is still a security guard. I can go on and on about this author, but we have seen him recycled so many times over, it would be a waste of time. If you want to be rich, work hard, save your money, and invest wisely. Reading the words of some charlatan won¿t do a thing for you except amuse you slightly.

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2006

    Not worth your time or money, not even worth the paper its printed on.

    If it was possible to give this book less than one star, I would. Throughout this whole book, there are many, many hokie directions such as telling the reader to put your hand on your heart and chant positive thoughts about money. Basically, all the book is saying is you should think positively about your relationship with money- how you attract it and how you repel it. All the while, he is trying to usher you into his really expensive seminars. What Eker has managed to do is write the longest ad ever in history and put it between two covers. It's full of fluff and hype. It barely scratches the surface and afterwards you will be dissatidfied that you spent all that time and money to get just that little sillly bit of information! Save your time and money for real books people! I still have my reciept so I'm going to return get my money back but the time spent reading this garbage is gone forever. You would learn so much more reading Napoleon Hill's 'Think and Grow Rich' and Robert Kiyosaki's 'Rich Dad, Poor Dad'.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 15, 2006

    One star is way too much for this book!

    Worst book I ever read. I couldn't wait to read it because its #1... I hated it! How it became a bestseller is the true mystery. This one was a big disappointment. Overly simplistic and almost silly, it failed to offer any insight. I found the author's tone condescending. If you like books that read like they are talking to a six year old and need life's simple lessons spoon fed to you, check out this book. Maybe the book would be suitable for someone who was completely ignorant but for most people, it is a waste of time.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2006

    More of a New Age Cult Than About Money

    Except for their getting ahold of your money of course. This book pretty much rips off Tony Robbins, and several New Age cult leaders, Don Miguel Ruiz and Carlos Castaneda. The seminars are cult recruiting. Stay far far away.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2006

    Book for naive people

    This metaphysical book is for those who know little about acquiring financial wealth. I prefer Rich Dad, Poor Dad which has more backbone.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2006

    Secrets of the Millionaire Mind: Mastering the Inner Game of Wealth

    After you read this book, you will either be pissed you spent your money or you will be laughing at how ridiculous this book was. All this book is worth is maybe a good laugh, it's not even worth the paper it was printed on. Eker gives some common sense advice mixed with some new age crazy talk. He also insults the reader and tries to get you to go to his expensive seminars. Hopefully this will be Eker's first and last book. Beware of this untrustworthy author.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2006

    Secrets of the Millionaire Mind: Mastering the Inner Game of Wealth

    I read this book from cover to cover and thought it was just ok. But I registered to go to the seminar anyway since it was free because I bought the book, and hoping I would have a better experience at the class than I did with the book. I had with me the book and the reciept as proof of purchase to make sure I could get in the class but they never checked if I ever did read the book or if I even really purchased it. Every single person there in the seminar got in for free. What I later learned that this seminar company does is recruit as many people as they can to this 'Millionaire Mind Intensive' seminar and then try to sell them packages of their other seminars that cost between $10,000 and $20,000. That's why the first seminar is free. And they create value in it to make you want to go. That is the reason why I went it is also the reason why everybody else went too. This book is just another tool in recruiting people to the first one so they can try to get you to spend thousands of dollars once you are there. Another thing is, at the seminar Eker tells the class to do some weird things that are what some have described as hokey, he also talks about religion and laws of the universe and asks the class to chant many different things and imagine invisible things floating in the room. If you still want to read the book, just be warned that you will be reminded at least three or four times in every single chapter that you need to attend the seminar.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2006

    Secrets of the Millionaire Mind: Mastering the Inner Game of Wealth

    I am extremely dissapointed that I bought this book. Not only are the ideas are very general and so vague, the book does not offer any practical advice that allows us to take action right away towards becoming more financially successful. The author just writes ideas that are so common sense, pretty much anyone who has even half a brain would already have figured this stuff out in their sleep. His demeaner is rude and obnoxious. I don't get the feeling that he cares at all about helping people. He just tries to sell his very expensive seminars in practially every section through out the whole book. In this book he also says that if you are not rich, then you must be flat broke and that deep down inside you don't really desire wealth and that you will be poor for the rest of your life- unless you show up to his seminar, of course. Who the heck is this T. Harv Eker to be saying this about people he's never met? It's so insulting to read this book. I was infuriated while reading it and so would you. How dumb does T Harv Eker think people are, anyway? Never mind throwing it away- I'd rather set fire to it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2006

    Secrets of the Millionaire Mind: Mastering the Inner Game of Wealth

    I read many business and self improvement books, and I really thought this one might be a good one but it was really aweful. I thought it was so very strange that it actually made a best seller list, until I read one of the other reviews that said and then it all made sense- of course he pre-saled enough books to make the best seller list! He is a business man trying to sell his seminars and now this book to promote the seminar. This book was terribly written, not worth your time or money. It is all a big scam to get you to buy the book and then a bigger scam to get you to purchase his seminars.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2006

    Secrets of the Millionaire Mind: Mastering the Inner Game of Wealth

    I went to Harv Eker's seminar before he wrote this book. This book was written to get more people to go to the seminar, that is why he writes about his seminar on practically every other page. Harv writes terribly. I was at one of his courses when he was strategizing how to pre-sell enough copies to get on the New York Best Seller list before having a single person even read the book yet. More than anything, Harv Eker is a salesman who is writing a book to sell more of his seminars. I think this book was not very well written, and I believe many people would find it annoying because of Harv's in-your-face tone and most of all it is very hokey. In the book, he suggests you put your hand on your head and on your heart and chant to yourself. There are many better books on how to become wealthy. If you buy this book, you will end up using it as a door stop or to prop up the table leg. Take it from me, I know. I was silly enough to attend the seminar, purchase a really huge package of other seminars that cost over $10,000 and then spent even more money after that because I didn't consider how much I would have to spend to fly to the city the class was held in, the nights of hotel stay, all my meals, the rental or sometimes taxi rides, the stuff I had to buy and bring to the class in order to participate, and all the days I would have to take off from my work to attend the classes. By the time I realized all this it was too late and they would not give my money back. To be honest, I am so embarrassed that I spent in total over $20,000. It started innocently but just snowballed completely out of control, and I am only one of the very many people who have made this mistake. Once you are there, it is so easy to be enticed. BUYER BEWARE, PLEASE!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2006

    Secrets of the Millionaire Mind: Mastering the Inner Game of Wealth

    This book was not very helpful to me. It mentions his seminar a lot and tells the reader many times to attend. I did read this book from beginning to end, and even with an open mind, I did not find anything useful. Like the author, this book and all its contents will be easily forgotten. I regret buying this book and I suggest you not waste your time.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2005

    Two Cents Worth, Not Worth It

    Eker's advice is neither worth the price of the book nor the time spent reading its 'secrets'i.e., same old, same old. Too much magic wand waving the reader into the author's expensive seminars and too little real-world advice.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2005

    Was a disappointment

    I bought this book thinking it would have some tips on how to become financially self sufficient but what I read was a marketing piece for the author's seminars. He had many tips on changing your mindset to a 'millionaire' by touching your head and saying it's so but he failed to include any ways to actually become wealthy. His only hints were to become self employed and manufacture something that can be sold to many people, like pencils, or to produce something that can generate royalties. But no where in the book does it say how to become wealthy.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2005

    misleading title, skim thru before wasting money!!!

    this book is not really very helpful for someone who is looking for investing tips and sound financial advice. It leans more towards the 'look in the mirror and repeat the words 'I want to be rich' approach'! If that is the kind of hokey inspiration that you are looking for, then this is your book, but if you need real practical advice, then pass on this book. You will be much happier that you did!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 7, 2005

    Same old nonsense...

    Waste of your money. The same 're-program' your brain story as we have seen from many authors. When the author actually gets to the spot of suggesting the ways to get wealthy, it is the same real estate / investment (not to forget - go to my seminar) as everybody else writes about. The book may make you feel good - but has no practical value.

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