Customer Reviews for

Secrets of the Temple: How the Federal Reserve Runs the Country

Average Rating 4
( 11 )
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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2004

    Very Powerful

    Definately not an easy read for non-banking types but well worth the effort. Greider provides an expansive understanding of the roots of money within the scope of government beyond what was expected in reading a book about the federal reserve. He also covers everything from the historical importance of the banking system as it applies to our current economy and culture to the religious economic initiatives that have differentiated our political present and continue to do so as we forge into a war riddled future. This is a necessary read for anyone who desires to be familiar with the inner workings of the monetary and political system in America as well as anyone who still believes that the buck stops with the executive branch of our government.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2003

    Indepth, informative and entertaining

    Excellent, in-depth look at the history of monetary policy. I gave the book 4 stars instead of 5 stars because of Greider's obvious (and ludicrous) slant. If the reader can separate and disregard Greider's flawed conclusions (proven flawed most glaringly by the 90's boom) from the wealth of historical and factual data presented then I would have to say this book is one of the best books I have read on this topic.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2000

    Good intro to dry subject

    Greider was quite interesting when he appeared on the Larry King radio show discussing this book.The book discusses how the policies and decisions of the federal reserve trickle down into economic issues the ordinary citizen can relate to. It is frightening in a way because we must feel absolutely confident with those entrusted to its management and that the long term best interests of the country are indeed in order.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 7, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Highly recommended, if you want to grasp the intricacies of government and finance over time

    If you start at the beginning it can be slow at first, and one will probably not plow through it in a couple days. Bu it t really is an excellent book. Once you get to know the chief characters, it can even begin to take on the power of great fiction, i.e., you just want to know what they are going to do next.

    And then, occasionally, there are really good analytic and myth busting passages. The chapter I have main in mind now ("The God Almighty Dollar") is one of those, and on top of that it is appropriately nuanced, avoiding the error of Gifford and company who play to their expected or real audience’s suspicions of a grand conspiracy. (Given Gifford's connections with the John Birch Society, one expects anti-Semitism to jump out as he is expounding, even if Gifford usually keeps that temptation under control.) No, the truth is more complex than that.

    The Fed does have considerable and largely hidden power—largely hidden but not inaccessible as books like Greider’s demonstrate-- but it is not a more or less omnipotent hidden power, as the discussion of the changes ca. 1979-80 make clear. It is limited by all sorts of factors. It’s actions ca. 1980 show just how limited it is: the Roller-Coaster chapter in Greider makes that clear. The Fed wanted one thing but the opposite frequently happened, at least in the short run.

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  • Posted April 1, 2013

    This is the first time I am writing an online review and only be

    This is the first time I am writing an online review and only because the book was really great. It gives a detailed history of the US Fed 
    during Volcker era and critiques monetarism very well. Thoroughly enjoyed it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2001

    Excellent, but somewhat biased against Volcker

    Greider's book does an excellent job of covering the history of the Fed, and the view from the inside during the Volcker era. However, he suggests that Volcker may have gone too far in slaying inflation that had plagued the US economy from the late 1960's to the early 1980's and tries to make the argument that excessive inflation was a good thing. The goal of any Fed should be, and has been under Volcker and Greenspan, is price stability. Thanks to Volcker's efforts, and subsequent efforts by Greenspan that has been largely been the case over the past 20 years. It is unfortunate for President Carter that he didn't appoint Volcker in 1978, instead of the hapless G. William Miller, for Carter would have stood a better chance of re-election in 1980. Also, it appears that Volcker and Reagan were acting at cross purposes in 1981 when Volcker wanted to finish the job by burying inflation once and for all while Reagan wanted to stimulate the economy with the tax cuts. The result being the massive budget deficits which took 15 years to cure.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2000

    Very interesting,informative

    Greider does an awesome job of explaining this little understood institution by the mainstream public. But he does not address other factors, like the NSA, which is the most secret govt agency and which can influence the economy by introducing new technologies into the marketplace. One might wonder how much NSA actually influences the economy.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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