Customer Reviews for

Sense and Sensibility

Average Rating 4
( 601 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(306)

4 Star

(161)

3 Star

(60)

2 Star

(37)

1 Star

(37)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

15 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

Sense and Sensibility

In Jane Austen¿s Sense and Sensibility, the classic tale of love and its consequences is told through the lives of the young and beautiful Dashwood sisters. Marianne, an imprudent and impulsive young lady, immediately falls in love with the handsome, yet unpredictable M...
In Jane Austen¿s Sense and Sensibility, the classic tale of love and its consequences is told through the lives of the young and beautiful Dashwood sisters. Marianne, an imprudent and impulsive young lady, immediately falls in love with the handsome, yet unpredictable Mr. Willoughby, scandalously displaying her affection for him. Elinor, although always reserved and collected, also falls in love, but unlike her sister, keeps her affection for her admirer concealed even from those she dearly loves. Through the opposite characterization of the two main characters, Austen criticizes the folly of not leading a balanced lifestyle, whether it is cold and distant or spontaneous and brash. The novel also depicts the troubles caused by love in a society where wealth and social standing are top priorities. Through a variety of characters ranging from a frantic, gluttonous sister, to a humble and kind colonel, Austen condemns the social institutions of her time that encouraged the priority of wealth and status when forming an opinion of a person. Throughout the novel, readers are hooked, held in suspense as they eagerly await to discover the results of the Dashwoods¿ adventures with love. Humorous, heartbreaking, and humbling, Austen combines lessons of life, love, and society defining Sense and Sensibility as a classic.

posted by Anonymous on November 6, 2006

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

Sense and Sensibility

This is the 2nd book that I have read from the B&N Classic list, but the first Jane Austin book. Some people have told me that her writing style is difficult to read, but I found that I had no problems. It is a classic tale of love and pain. I find it surreal that peopl...
This is the 2nd book that I have read from the B&N Classic list, but the first Jane Austin book. Some people have told me that her writing style is difficult to read, but I found that I had no problems. It is a classic tale of love and pain. I find it surreal that people fall in love so quickely! Or maybe the book doesn't give an accurate interpretation of the timeline. It is neither hear nor there, I actually enjoyed the first Austin novel and looking forward to the next one on the B&N list. I am curious to find out if all of her novels are about the trials of love or is there a surprise in store for me?!?!? I am a firm believer in the classics always being a perk in any book club, but reality is that I believe this is a wonderful book for a raining day, curl up with a warm blanket and a cup of hot cocoa:)
Stay tuned for my next book review from the classic list: The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne.

posted by Bookjunkie40 on February 26, 2010

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 165 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 9
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2006

    Sense and Sensibility

    In Jane Austen¿s Sense and Sensibility, the classic tale of love and its consequences is told through the lives of the young and beautiful Dashwood sisters. Marianne, an imprudent and impulsive young lady, immediately falls in love with the handsome, yet unpredictable Mr. Willoughby, scandalously displaying her affection for him. Elinor, although always reserved and collected, also falls in love, but unlike her sister, keeps her affection for her admirer concealed even from those she dearly loves. Through the opposite characterization of the two main characters, Austen criticizes the folly of not leading a balanced lifestyle, whether it is cold and distant or spontaneous and brash. The novel also depicts the troubles caused by love in a society where wealth and social standing are top priorities. Through a variety of characters ranging from a frantic, gluttonous sister, to a humble and kind colonel, Austen condemns the social institutions of her time that encouraged the priority of wealth and status when forming an opinion of a person. Throughout the novel, readers are hooked, held in suspense as they eagerly await to discover the results of the Dashwoods¿ adventures with love. Humorous, heartbreaking, and humbling, Austen combines lessons of life, love, and society defining Sense and Sensibility as a classic.

    15 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 3, 2008

    Lovely

    You can't go wrong with Austen but Sense and Sensibility is not nearly as romantic as Pride and Prejudice.

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 16, 2010

    Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austin

    SENSE AND SENSIBILITY by Jane Austin is a Historical classic. It is a true classic love story. The Insight Edition has relevant information about England, their customs and Jane Austin's life during the Regency era. It has likable characters, romance, and family. If you enjoy Jane Austin this is a must read. It is one of the all classic books.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Love it

    When I first started this book, I was a bit confused, but as I read on I fell in love with the time and setting of the novel. You really fall in love with the characters and get a sense of what marriage and especially money meant in that time and how they where related to one another.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 4, 2013

    For Those Who Enjoy Reading About Everyday Social Situations

    Sense and Sensibility was the first book I was forced to read as a young person. At the time, I hated it. I could not understand what people saw in Jane Austen. I read twenty-two chapters before I quit, and to my mind at the time, NOTHING happened. There were no murders, no life-altering circumstances, nothing dramatic. Jane Austen pretty much depicted the petty squabbles, jealousies, and annoyances of backward people. It wasn't really a romance, and yet the whole story seemed to be supported on the disappointments and triumphs in love of the two major characters.

    Many years later, I have read it--and managed to finish it. I can't believe that I was able to pick up and appreciate the social commentary that I failed to appreciate as a teenager. Though I think Pride and Prejudice is better, Sense and Sensibility has its merits. The characters are well-developed, and some are sympathetic--like Colonel Brandon.

    However, I do think this is a book that requires a person to reach a certain stage in their life where they can appreciate "people watching." It probably helps if the characters remind you of people that you know or situations you have experienced. Having been disappointed in love myself, I was able to relate to Marianne more than I could as an inexperienced teenager.

    Of course, sometimes knowing people who remind you of the characters can be a drawback if you really hate the people. However, I would say it is a definite MUST, to appreciate Jane Austen, that you be content with a book that deals with social commentary and doesn't require action or dramatic events. If you need a helicopter crash, an explosion, or someone being brutally murdered to get you through a book...then Jane Austen is definitely not for you.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2013

    Recommended

    I enjoyed this book, even though it was a slower book for me to get through. The wording and sentence structure was a bit more challenging than your modern read. However, I would definitely recommend this book as one of the classics that should be on your list.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 10, 2010

    A World of Dichotomies

    I'd say that the moral of the story for Sense and Sensibility is: evil does not always get its just rewards, while the good do not always get what they deserve. But still, in the end, the heroine's obtained as much of a happily ever after as they could. I love Austen's dry humor and her sense of irony. For it is interesting that Elinor, who once said that wealth has a part to play in ones happiness, gave up all hope of riches when she married the love of her life. And Marianne, who said that love is the most important part of happiness, entered into a marriage with a man that she did not quite love, though deeply admired, and who happened to be very rich.

    Overall, the book was a wonderful read and I am very glad to have read it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 21, 2009

    Wonderful Sister Story

    Jane Austen was still maturing as a writer when she penned this novel, but at the heart, it is the story of the Dashwood family and how much they love and support each other. The stars, of course, are Marianne and Elinor. In my opinion, Elinor will be very happy in the future while Marrianne and the Col. might find out that they were mistmatched.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 11, 2009

    Sense and Sensibilaty

    I think this a was a interesting book. I recommend this book for people who like the drama/chick flick books. A lot of the words I had to look up because I did not know the meaning of them. It was an overall great book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 23, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    liked it

    I didnt like this book as much as i loved Pride and Prejudice and Persuasion. I thought Marianne was so selfindulgent and self centered. Elinor so meek and selfless. The difference in the personalities of the sisters was very interesting. The plot was slow at times. I was kind of disappointed after i read the book eventhough Elinor ended up with Edward, i thought she deserved better.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 28, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Awesome, but...

    I truly loved this book, but what prevented me from giving me this book 5 stars were these three characters, Marianne, Lucy Steele, and Willoughby. Marianne was a big cry baby and I wish she could of tried to be as strong as her sister Elinor. Lucy Steele was a jerk because in the end she just married for the money. While Willoughby, as Lucy, married for money and in the end suffered tremendously with the thought that he could of been happy with Marianne. I feel that there is a life lesson involved with Willoughby's situation, but it still doesn't excuse the fact that he had what was coming to him!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2008

    First time readers or vetrans will love the supplemental material!

    So you want to read Sense and Sensibility. Great choice! Jane Austen¿s first published novel (1811) can get lost in the limelight of her other `darling child¿, Pride and Prejudice, but is well worth the effort. There are many editions available in print today, and the text can stand on its own, but for those seeking a `friendlier¿ version with notes and appendixes, the question arises of how much supplemental material do you need, and is it helpful? One option is the Oxford World¿s Classics new revised edition of Sense and Sensibility that presents an interesting array of additional material that comfortably falls somewhere between just the text, and supplemental overload. This volume offers what I feel a good edition should be, an expansive introduction and detailed notes supporting the text in a clear, concise and friendly manner that the average reader can understand and enjoy. The material opens with a one paragraph biography of the life of Jane Austen which seemed rather slim to this Austen enthusiast¿s sensibility, and most certainly too short for a neophyte. The introduction quickly made up for it in both size and content at a whopping 33 pages! Wow, author Margaret Anne Doody does not disappoint, and it is easy to understand why after eighteen years publishers continue to use her excellent essay in subsequent editions. Amazingly, the introduction is not at all dated. The material covered is accessible to any era of reader, touching upon the novels publishing history, plot line, character analysis, and historical context. Doody thoughtfully presents the reader with an analysis of the major themes in the novel such as the dichotomy of sense and sensibility as it relates to the two heroines Elinor and Marianne, the portrayal of negligent mothers, men represented as the ultimate hunter, secrecy, deceit and concealment, and the crippling impact of the inheritance laws and primogeniture on women during the Regency era. Interlaced with Doody¿s interpretations are her astute observations of Austen¿s writing style with references to pages in the novel and outside sources. The entire essay is well researched, populated with footnotes, and an enjoyable complement to the text. The notes on the text explain the editorial trail since the novel¿s first publication in 1811, whose subtle changes and their significance I will defer to my more learned colleague Prof. Moody. The select bibliography is indeed select, and includes many editions that deserve recognition as the best of what is available in print on Jane Austen¿s life, works and critical analysis. One of my favorites listed is Jane Austen: A Family Record (1913) by William Austen-Leigh and Richard Arthur Austen-Leigh, revised and enlarged by Deirdre Le Faye (1989). I was also pleasantly surprised to see a category including film versions and commentaries which is often overlooked by other publishers. The chronology of Jane Austen¿s life lists both significant events and what transpired historically in matching columns. The choices are relevant and interesting with the exception of two events that this writer found humorous - 1795 Jane Austen flirts with Tom Lefroy, and in 1815 Humphry Davy invents miner¿s safety lamp. I have yet to be convinced that Austen¿s flirtation with Tom Lefroy had a significant impact on her life, nor am I clear how a clergyman¿s daughter living in southern England would be directly affected by the invention of a miner¿s safety lamp. Just thinking out loud here! The two appendixes on rank and social status, and the intricacies of country dance touched upon both subjects clearly, but briefly, using stories from Jane Austen¿s life to put the era in context. I appreciated the humorous example of how young women attending balls and assemblies were accompanied by chaperones, usually a mother or an older woman, who were expected to pass the time with cards or socializing rather than dancing themselves. In a letter to her sister Cassa

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2008

    A Great Classic Novel

    Jane Austen¿s Sense and Sensibility is about two sisters who, after their father died, try looking for love in their new, lowered, social rank. Marianne is a feisty girl with determination to get what she wants, when she wants, and is disappointed many times. Elinor is the quiet older sister who keeps her emotions bundled up inside to keep on a strong front for her family. Elinor eventually finds love in her half brothers, wife¿s, brother, Mr. Edward Ferrars, and although he had to give up his title in order to marry her, they still end up happy. Marianne finds and loses love in the form of Mr. Willoughby, who appears as a charming young gentleman, but is soon found out to be nothing more than a lying fool. She finds love again in Colonel Brandon. My favorite part in the book is when Elinor finds out that Edward is not married to Miss Steele, but his brother is instead: `Yes,¿ said he, `they were married last week, and are now at Dawlish.¿ Elinor could sit no longer. Se almost ran out of the room and as soon as the door was closed, burst into tears of joy, which at first she thought would never cease. Edward, who had till then looked anywhere, rather than at her, saw her hurry away, and perhaps saw ¿ or even heard her emotion for immediately afterwards he fell into a reverie, which no remarks, no inquiries, no affectionate addresses of Mrs. Dashwood could penetrate, and at last, without saying a word, quitted the room, and walked out towards the village ¿ leaving the others in the greatest of astonishment and perplexity on a change in his situation, so wonderful and so sudden ¿ a perplexity which they had no means of lessening but by their own conjectures. The way that she takes it, with such joy, she can¿t express it but through tears is my favorite part in the book. I enjoyed reading this classic novel by Jane Austen, and I know that if you have the determination to read through the sometimes awkward language, you will find yourself enjoying it too as many others have before.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2006

    An enjoyable read

    This is second only to Austen's 'Pride and Prejudice.' I enjoyed reading it very much. Mary Ann tended to get on my nerves, but her sister made up for her lack in character.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 14, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 165 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 9