Customer Reviews for

The Serpent on the Crown (Amelia Peabody Series #17)

Average Rating 4.5
( 37 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 37 Customer Reviews
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  • Posted November 19, 2012

    awesome

    I've read the series 3 times and would read it all again in another year or so

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2012

    Serpent on the Crown

    As always Elizabeth Peters books are always entertaining. I enjoyed it with the exception of Radcliff being a little careless with a valuable item. I would expect a little more caution on his part but thats what contributes to the adventure. It's an easy book to read and enjoy what steps are taken to get the item back.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 26, 2009

    Amelia Peabody does it again!

    Amelia could be Agatha Christie's first cousin. The charactters are so believable, it makes me want to go to Egypt to meet them. The plots are exciting and engrossing.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 4, 2005

    Enticing as a lead-in to next

    Serpent on the Crown was weaker than some of her others in this series (I agree with A Bourne, too). It was fun to see just how much closer to King Tut's tomb the Emersons can come before someone actually stumbles into it! They've been past the site at least a dozen times. I too appreciated the reduction of 'air-time' given to the grandchildren, and bemoan the reduction of time given to Amelia's musings. Waiting with bated breath for the next one.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2005

    Somewhat boring, but still a good read.

    I have read every one of the Amelia Peabody books and have thoroughly enjoyed them, but this one left me slightly flat and bored. Not the page-turner I found the others to be. However, I do like the way Amelia and Emerson are being allowed to age and see how they deal with, or not deal with, the changes that having grown children, with their own family, brings. David John is just too ridiculously, unbelievably mature for a four year old. The story line seemed a little thin and not developed as well as the others in the series. There are also many references to events that occurred in the earlier books that if someone has not read them, may not hold much meaning. However, overall, still a good read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2005

    disappointing

    I love the Amelia Peabody series and have read them all, but found this one to be a disappointment. The books are usually steeped in the period and the place, in a way that brings you right alongside the Emersons, with witty dialogue. There is always the sense that you are Amelia's confidante and audience. This book was lacking those things. The frequent intrusions, or so they seemed to me, of manuscript H excerpts were irritating. Details seemed in short supply and the dialogue was not at all up to par. It lacked the usual wit and the period feel. The characters seemed flat and not as well developed as usual, and frankly, I missed hearing things from Amelia's point of view; it was more a transcript of events than a glimpse into Amelia's journal and personal thoughts. It didn't even seem to have as much information about archeology and history as usual. I found myself bored and just wanting to get reading the book over with, which has never happened with one of this series. Did she get a ghost writer? I did find the spin on Carter and Tut's tomb amusing; I have been wondering for a long time how that discovery would play into their lives. For the time being, I will fall back on one of the older books if I want a good read and wait for the next installment.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2005

    Just....wonderful

    I sincerely enjoyed this installment in the lives of the Emerson clan.....more interesing setting, absorbing plot and villans, and thank-goodness there's less of the Emerson grandchildren, who are royal pains to read about....

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2005

    READER IS A WHIZ AT DISTINCTIVE VOICES

    Veteran voice performer Barbara Rosenblat doesn't miss an iota of the sly humor that readers/listeners have come to expect in the popular Amelia Peabody series by Elizabeth Peters. Ms. Rosenblat successfully inhabits diverse characters and presents distinctive voices in this return to 1922 Egypt. As fans hoped they would, Amelia Peabody, Emerson, her archaeologist spouse, and her retinue have returned to Egypt for one more excavation. The 17th in a highly popular series, the story once again provides listeners with an extended visit to another time and a mysterious place. Almost upon arrival a quiet afternoon is interrupted by a visit from writer Magda Petherick who comes bearing a small treasure, a golden image of a king, which she claims is cursed. Magda further claims that the image is responsible for the death of her husband, and more deaths will follow unless the object is returned to the tomb from which it was taken. Of course, Amelia and her group don't quite believe Magda but they can't resist a challenge. So, they set off to try to find the secrets of the statue's origins only to uncover a former enemy and imminent danger for themselves. 'The Serpent On The Crown' is exotic adventure at its best - don't miss it! - Gail Cooke

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2005

    Charmingly Fun and Deeply Satisfying!

    The Emersons are at it again! Knee deep in digs, dead bodies, murder and mayhem. It¿s 1922, the Emersons are in Egypt to excavate, but as usual, they don¿t just dig up the past, they get involved in criminal investigation. This time, an outrageous author of gothic fiction, Magda Von Ormond enlists the Emersons. She gives them a beautiful gold statue of the Amarna period from her late husband¿s collection. She believes it is cursed, or so she says. Then she goes missing. Amelia, Emerson, Ramses, Nefret, and, yes, even Sethos are involved in finding the authoress and laying ¿the curse¿ to rest. THE SERPENT ON THE CROWN is a very charming, fun and wonderfully satisfying mystery. Highly recommended! ¿ Leslie Strang Akers

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2005

    Fabulous addition to the series!

    This is an excellent addition to an already outstanding series. Elizabeth Peters has hit again with The Serpent on the Crown. If you have come to love Amelia and her eccentric family, you will love this book. This story, which takes place in 1922 Egypt, includes the Emerson family standards like troubles with tomb robbers, dead bodies, and your choice of suspects. It may be a little difficult to follow if you have not read the others in the series. But if you have, it's like visiting old friends and joining them on their wild adventures.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2005

    Can't say it any better than A. Bourne (April 20 review) but it's worth saying again.

    This volume was not the best showing of an amazing talent. This book was more like a transcript than a final product and perhaps introduced a ghost writer into the mix (thank you A. Bourne for saying what I didn't dare say first but thought from the beginning). The dialogue was thin and lacked the really great poignant parenthetical asides from Amelia Peabody- Emerson. It also did not give life to the depth of character and relationships among the Emerson family members and relations (similarly remarked upon by the Library Journal reviewer). The storyline suffered as well, perhaps only because of the weak support of great writing that has, in past episodes, given 'verisimilitude' (as Amelia would say) to otherwise unbelievable adventures. I dearly hope that a new reader of this fantastic and outstanding series is not introduced first to 'The Serpent on the Crown' and I'm again with A. Bourne in returning to read earlier series adventures that are ever enlightening and prove the unquestionable genius of Elizabeth Peters dispite this most recent book that's just short of the mark of excellence we've come to expect.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    This is a solid entry in a fine series

    The war to end wars has been over for a few years so that by 1922 it is relatively safe for Egyptologists to return to excavations especially in the Valley of the Kings. Foreign archeologists back in Egypt include Amelia Peabody and her spouse Emerson working with their son Ramses and daughter-in-law Nefret at Deir el Medina.................... Author Magda Petherick arrives with an ancient gold artifact figure of an Egyptian king that she insists is cursed; the owner dies rather quickly once possessing the statuette as occurred to her spouse, a known collector. Magda pleads with Emerson to return the blighted relic to its tomb before someone else dies. However others disagree with Magda and want the statuette as the gold alone is worth a fortune. This crowded field includes Emerson, his friend Cyrus, the victim¿s two adult children, and a host of others that would make DeMille proud. The ethical Amelia wants to do the right thing so she begins retracing the ill-fated steps that Magda¿s spouse Pringle took when the widow vanishes and is later found dead. Amelia plans to expose the culprit................. Though the family interrelationships seem somewhat tedious in the seventeenth Peabody historical tale, the mystery and the Egyptology in the Post WWI era make for a fine time for fans of the series. The story line is action-packed yet provides a deep look at how 1920s archeologists looked back to ancient civilizations. The death of Pringle is cleverly crafted to make it appear as if a brother curse to Tut¿s exists and the who-done-it is fabulously designed so that the reader will want Amelia to find the culprit. This is a solid entry in a fine series................ Harriet Klausner

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2005

    Another Great Mystery

    This book is another great mystery in the Amelia Peabody series. The quirky family adds just the right amount of humor to the famous Elizabeth Peters nail biting suspense. Tomb robbers and murderers...it's just another day at work for the Emersons. The more frequent parts from Manuscript H was a nice change and allows a different perspective to Amelia's often oblivious nature. I wouldn't recommend starting the series with this book, it might be slightly confusing, but for those following the series, it's the perfect addition!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2005

    You CAN travel through time

    Reading the diaries of Amelia Peabody is like stepping into the fabulous and mysterious Egypt of the 1880s to 1920s. Indeed, I was driven to travel to Cairo, Dahshur, Tel El Amarna and thousand-gated Thebes to experience for myself what EP so brilliantly recreates and, aside from a few more cars and the sad absence of Shepheard's Hotel, it was just as she described. Every plot is perfect, every character fully rounded and EP's extensive knowledge of Egyptology enriches every moment. Whether your interest is mystery, archeology, early feminism, or just great writing, you can't lose.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2005

    I AM SO EXCITED!!!!

    I am a die-hard fan of Elizabeth Peters and the Amelia Peabody mysteries. Every one of the books in the series has been spectacular! I am confident that 'The Serpent on the Crown' will be no exception!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2005

    One book and you'll be hooked!

    Amelia Peabody and Elizabeth Peters are gems! At last an author and a character who are smart, funny, strong willed and amazing women. Read this series from beginning to end and you'll be amazed that such intelligent and entertaining stories are also good clean fun! You'll swear you have been transported to another world.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2011

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