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Settling Accounts: In at the Death (Settling Accounts Series #4)

Average Rating 4
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 104 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2006

    How much Nazism can you unload on the South?

    The best thing one can say about this book is that it moves the story along. However, after about four doses of the same Nazi-Germany-in-the-New-South, this is wearing thin. Turtledove moves Hitler, the SS, death camps, submachine guns, high cycle rate machine guns, Stukas, blitzkrieg, and probably a few others I missed, while missing details like Patton's IVORY handled revolvers. This is despite, in this timeline, The CSA are allied with the British and French, who did not create those things. He also gives the CSA a semiautomatic rifle, despite not holding the Springfield Arsenal. One suspects that all this is also to drag the book along and prevent a two-chapter war. For devotees only.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2014

    Great

    Great if u love madeup history

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2014

    Shows

    Shows y if seceddind from union would have been a mistake

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2014

    Lpve series

    Love series

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  • Posted July 22, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Very much Recommended

    I highly recommend this book, well written and thought out. It is interested to to watch the CSA get slowly and inextricably pushed back.

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  • Posted July 11, 2012

    Excellent ongoing story

    Despite the historically-accurate racist terms and attitudes of some characters, this book (this series) is NOT racist, nor are any of its predecessors. It is a reasonably accurate accounting of what COULD have happened if the South had won the War Between the States (Civil War). The writing continues to be interesting, and the characters believable. The situations are both militarily and civilly logical, as well as entertaining. It is, after all, ALTERNATE history fiction. Harry continues to do a very fascinating (to me) job of developing this story line, with both known and little-known characters from our history. My only negative comment is not on the story, but on the tardiness of the publisher in getting out the pocket edition. I really don't like lugging around these large-sized paperbacks. Go from hardbound to pocket, willya? Please? I almost didn't buy (yet; this large edition) because of that. This series is even more interesting (to me) than the original, relatively sci-fi "Guns of the South" (which was interesting in itself). I'm enjoying this sequel and have already purchased ITS sequel(s). Good work! From a modern Southerner who recognises this alternate reality.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2011

    Very interesting

    I love this book its an excellent and creative read

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  • Posted July 31, 2011

    Great book

    Highly recommended

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  • Posted July 31, 2011

    Great book

    I enjoyed it in the series and highly recommend it.

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  • Posted July 31, 2011

    Great book

    I loved this series.

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  • Posted July 31, 2011

    Awesome piece of the series

    Highly recommended.

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  • Posted February 25, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Read this one, and the next

    This is the stunning second to last book.

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  • Posted February 25, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Very Good book

    I think this is a great book, read it!

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  • Posted February 25, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Super Good

    Highly recommended, superb writing, you want to read every single page and thirst for even more.

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  • Posted February 25, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Super Good

    Stunning, the rest though, is left to your imagination.

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  • Posted October 17, 2009

    Harry Turtledove continues to amaze me

    SETTLING ACCOUNTS: THE GRAPPLE is the 9th Harry Turtledove book I've purchased and read.

    His "What if" of Americana draws from actual history as well as the flights of fancy. From HOW FEW REMAIN thru THE GRAPPLE his take and twists of what could have been is interwoven between the lives of several characteres all striving to survive in this timeline.

    His take on the political landscape is nothing less than brilliant and I must admit some of his suppositions have driven me to research actual history to see where those divergent points came from.

    He's a brilliant historian... he has to be in order to do what he does so well.

    His character development is exceptional and I've found myself almost grieving as some of them have died.

    But the best thing I can say about any author is he's a great story teller.

    And putting aside everything else he is one of the BEST story tellers I've had the joy of reading.

    I've read many long historical series and eventually wind up packing those books away and selling them in a yard sale or donating them to a charity auction.

    That's not going to happen with THE GRAPPLE and my other books by Mr. Turtledove. He's a permanent addition to my library.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2009

    What might have been.

    Many have complained that this book paints the South in a bad light and is unrealistic. However, Turtledove's account of a Nazi-esque South is sadly not as far from the truth as many would contend. Featherston's rabble rousing methods, while molded to fit the Hitler mold, clearly show some influence from such Southern leaders as "Pitchfork" Ben Tillman who openly advocated the murder of Black Southerners in the early 1900s and was rewarded with jobs as Governor and Senator but who was openly populist and anti-elitist as well.
    The world Turtledove presents of the 1930s and 40s is very different from our world and very strange, but not altogether implausible. Of course, a lot of factors and choices would have had to be made to bring us to that point and Turtledove shows how these choices could have been made. It is a fascinating yarn that makes us appreciate (at least from the US point of view) that we made different choices. He also does us a service by shedding light on certain forgotten realities, like the violent US government suppression of the LDS church in the 1870s, which very well might have persisted were the Northern States the weak totality of the United States.
    Turtledove does some fun and interesting things with his characters and their development and it makes us wonder about just how we have gotten here. Turtledove is an academic historian with the gifts of storyteller and his fascinating What If tales provide excellent food for thought if for nothing else than whether his What If is plausible or not. People should not take them too seriously or feel too personally insulted because What If tales can easily show us the great devils of our nature rather than the angels. I am sure 1890s Germans would have been quite appalled at the notion of massacring their Jewish population, a population well-integrated into their society, but then events and various series of choices led them to unspeakable horror, a horror which it seems all societies are capable of committing.
    This story makes one wonder about so many of the realities of our world which we too often take for inevitable certainties. By reading the What If tales we hopefully realize just how much power we DO have to shape history and our own destinies.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2007

    This war is a dud

    I've enjoyed most of Mr Turtledove's books, but this one is less like alternative history and more like pin the tail on the donkey. Jake Featherston is Hitler. The CSA has to lose. Got it. I read Book One of this series, mostly because I had always found the characters interesting. No longer. Now they have all the depth of cartoon characters. The whole war turns on a pinhead and all the CSA characters are killed or marginalized as Nazi-like. The USA, depite fighting a war on several fronts are able to turn it around and begin to win the war. But all of a sudden the CSA characters are a bunch of idiots and the USA can do no wrong. I knew when I started reading the series that the CSA 'NAZIS' were destined to lose the war, but no logic is shown for how a better equipped army suddenly starts losing to one that was back on its heels. I read about 80 per cent of this book and stopped, and have the third one but will never read it, much less buy the fourth. It's Mr Turledove's history and he can do what he wants, he'll just be doing it without me.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2007

    Excellent conclusion, more to come?

    This book is the conclusion of the 'Settling Accounts' tetralogy, which in turn is part of the alternate storyline of a North America where the South had won the Civil War 'this is the 11th book in that series'. About the first 50% of the book deal with the final stages of this alternate WWII, including the development and usage of atomic bombs 'I counted 10', jet fighters, V2-type missiles, and the liberation of the CSA death camps. The last part is about the USA starting occupation business in the South. As always, the book tells the story of a bunch of individuals on both sides, each story about 4-5 pages long before switching to the next character, and then back a chapter or two later. This sometimes makes it a bit difficult to concentrate on the overall storyline, but at the end it makes the book a very entertaining read. Altogether a very satisfying book, however, I had expected part of the storyline to cover the ongoing occupation of Canada. Also, at the end of the book we still don't know much about the war progress in Europe. Opposite from when Dr. Turtledove tried his hands on an 'alternate future' in the last book of the Colonization series, I sincerely wish this series will go on. It is just Spring of 1945 in this universe, and lordy what possibilities a creative mind could come up with - Elvis fighting underground in the CSA, Fidel Castro becoming a famous baseball player, JF Kennedy becoming the first man on the moon, the Cold War with alternate foes, - man, it would be a shame if we wouldn't see another trilogy. I know I would enjoy it!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2007

    Ended...but not concluded

    Apparently the last in Harry Turtledove¿s alternate history series, a decade long undertaking set on the premise that the South had won the Civil War, ¿In at the Death¿ is at once both satisfying and disappointing. The satisfying part comes from watching the ¿bad guys,¿ those who have worn ¿black hats¿ throughout this thinly veiled alternate to Hitler¿s rise to power in Germany, finally get their comeuppance. The sad deaths of several character to whom the reader became attached are largely missing from this episode. Only the bad guys buy the farm in this one¿so there is a measure of emotional reward there. That said, however, Turtledove made several crucial decisions that will leave many readers feeling cheated and maybe more than a little disappointed. The quick, ignominious end of the Confederate president is a surprise, a bit of a disappointment¿and maybe a message. Perhaps the no frills end to this evil life was Turtledove¿s editorial comment on the question of whether evil ought to be granted any celebrity whatsoever. In this case, he certainly granted it none. Similarity, after all the build-up, the war actually ends rather quickly in this tale¿leaving a good chunk of the book to the post-war adjustments made by the various characters. One or two are quite surprising, even if logical. Unfortunately, they are not by themselves really enough to carry the story through the pages allotted to this portion of the saga. Finally, Turtledove¿s apparent 'and VERY regrettable' decision to end the saga here literally leaves a world of questions unanswered. Another trilogy could easily follow this one, even if the central character, the driving force of the entire series is no longer on the scene. Fans can only hope that after a year or two Turtledove will return to this world of his creation and bring to story forward another 20 years. It would be worth the wait.

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