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The Shame of the Nation: The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2013

    So far very informative

    I have only read 70 or so pages. Very informative of the serious problems in public schools in poorer neighborhoods. Perfect title.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2012

    Kozol's book is one of the most complete workts ever done on thi

    Kozol's book is one of the most complete workts ever done on this subject. From start to finish he delves deep into this horrific problem from every direction, taking real life interviews with minority children spread over four decades, disturbing reports from dozens of teachers caught up in a racist system that grinds them to dust in many cases with endless and unecessary reporting requirements reminicient of a military code of discipline, numerous examples of nausea inducing school facillities with tales of condemned and unsafe buildings filled with rats, asbestos and lead based paint posoning, and an exceptional writers gift that propels the reader straight into a gut wrenching look at the raw nerve of America's dirtiest little open secret- the fact that we are now almost 60 years past the landmark US Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education, yet our inner city schools are more segregated than ever. White conservatives will attack Kozol but his research is impeccable, backed by over 60 pages of detailed footnotes and his 40 years experience working with inner city school children give him an air of respected authority as an expert on this subject. This is a must read for everyone in America who thinks that institutional racism is an artifact from the past. It was so riveting I read the entire 337 pages in one sitting. Now I wil read it again just to highlight the text...an AWESOME read cover to cover. If this doesn't make you want to cry, you're desperately in need of a heart.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2011

    Rivoting! Heart wrenching!

    I was told that this was a read that would bring a lot of emotion...some positive, and some negative. It proved to be true! (read Savage Inequalities and SOTN consecutively). As an educator in a low socio-economic, inner city, high school, Mr. Kozol's writings were all too real. One can't help but come away with a sense of moral obligation to enact change!

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  • Posted November 25, 2008

    I HAD DISCOVERED SOMETHING WHILE READING THE SHAME OF THE NATION.

    Segregation is something we have known for awhile now. It is something that was made to go away during the 1960's, but if you think about it never really did. In Jonathan Kozol's novel, "The Shame of The Nation" it has strong voices of students experiencing these issues of resegregation. He uses pathos well by strongly putting the shame on people who ignore the segregated school systems. Kozol does have lots of statistics on how the segregated schools are mostly all low income and how the schools of majority have a higher income. I see that he is trying to prove a point, but he doesn¿t actually do all his research. He doesn't research all types of schools to see what this problem is really about. He only targets segregated poor schools and rich white schools. What about the all white schools that are poor or the diverse schools that have no funding? I have a very good example of a diverse school that has low funding. I actually went to a diverse high school and the funding was so low that we didn't even have our own football field. I discovered that he just leaves out a whole chunk of information because he wants to make his novel stronger by only focusing on two types of schools. I also discover that he talks about making all the schools equal with the same amount of money, which would be great, but that wouldn't resolve segregation. If you think about it, we have to go to schools in our district and even though the schools are equal, the communities are not. That would mean that the low income students would be at the same school and the higher income would be all at the same school still because of where they live. Kozol really should of thought about these things before writing his novel.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2007

    Mr. Kozol does it again!

    Jonathan Kozol is a master at that art of giving data and facts a compelling face, making him a powerful and articulate advocate. In this book, he revisits many of the children and schools which were the subjects of his earlier works, yet he is far from repetitive because he finds that many changes have taken place, although not for the better. In The Shame of the Nation, he has also broadened his scope and places particular emphasis on current public policy and sociological trends. I would highly recommend this book to anyone who votes, pay taxes or cares about the future of this country's children. The index and footnotes are also very useful for anyone who wants to research or learn more about children in underserved communities and/or the U.S. educational system.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2006

    Kozol should co-write with Andrew Hacker

    Kozol presents his subject with the passion of an educator. While his presentation is impassioned, it is short on hard statistics. He needs to join forces with Andre Hacker, Two Nations : Black and White, Separate, Hostile, Unequal to provide the hard-core statistical backing. His presentation is also littered with Bush bashing and political ranting. This detracts sorely from the book, as do his praises of 'credentialed liberals,' and he assumes that if a person is a 'credentialed liberal,' we are suppose to accept what they say without further proof. It is sad that such an important topic has to be approached with such politically near-sighted ranting. He fails to mention that the educational system has been on a rapid decline through many administrations, republican and democrat, and both political parties use it as the ball in the political football game, and then shelve it when the campaign is over. I nearly put the book down several times because his ranting is very distracting -- and totally unnecessary, if not unfair. Never the less, he has something important to say, but does not offer much in the way of finding a fix for the problem.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2005

    Troubling Liberalism! Major Distortion!

    Kozol's earlier books, Death at an Early Age and Savage Inequalities, are poignant, scathing attacks about the challenges certain youths face in American public education. If the reader hopes this book will be the same, then he or she will be sadly mistaken. Number one problem: Kozol talks about the injustices of the Reagan administration. Then we leap to 1991/2 and discuss Bush Sr. and how he further eroded the gains of segregation this leads to the diatribe against the current president. While it is fair to level criticism, the analysis suffers a major flaw: the entire Clinton presidency is NOT mentioned (indeed, the author would think that there was no Clinton). This was obviously done to distort what is happening while focusing on Republican presidents. Troubling and downright untruthful to gloss over an entire eight year period. WHY? Kozol starts page 39 with an eight year old questioning her class standing in society. Where, oh where, did this eight year old suffer an epiphany that made her class conscious? Ridiculous, to say the least, and what makes the book much less interesting from earlier Kozol works: too few and authentic children narratives. While I could go on and on, there are several other claims. He says that kids would be better off if more went to pre-school (research says that kids are better off with their parents and any achievement results are ephemeral), the accountability movement is too stiffling (might be true, but what about movements by high-end schools that embraced this years ago through Jacobs' Curriculum Mapping), and that the government needs to fix the problem (once again, this absolves the individual of responsibility and is another attempt to destroy local control of education). We do not need a socialist state! Besides, controlling for SES and family structure, race in most research studies are inclusive about the results of integration. Also, Kozol forgets that NCLB was also sponsored by Teddy Kennedy (until the NEA came out against it).

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 7, 2005

    The cliche 'Sad but True' Doesn't do it justice

    I can't say that I'm happier having read this book. I can't say that I am suprised either. Kozol has been great at giving voices to those who others would rather forget about. This book is no exception. If anything, it has revived my philosphy of education and that all students- reguardless of age, gender, race, or address deserves to be valued and to get the best education we can give them no matter what the cost. We owe it to our children, and our neighbor's children, and our mechanic's children, and our landlord's children, and....

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 15, 2005

    I've been waiting for this one!

    I used to require Kozol's 'Savage Inequalities' in my college-level Foundations of Education course. I have been searching for a more current text regarding the poor state of our schools today. No one paints a more truthful, unsettling picture of the tragic inequalities existing in our public schools than Kozol. This will be new required reading for my course!

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    Posted June 3, 2011

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