Customer Reviews for

The Shape Shifter (Joe Leaphorn and Jim Chee Series #18)

Average Rating 3.5
( 21 )
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(5)

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(9)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

As always, a pure joy to read! I loved it!

I've read a few of the other reviews, and felt I needed to put in my 2 cents. I read purely for enjoyment, not to critique the plot, or the characters. As far as I am concerned, this is another terrific story in the Joe Leaphorn/Jim Chee series by Tony Hillerman. Joe...
I've read a few of the other reviews, and felt I needed to put in my 2 cents. I read purely for enjoyment, not to critique the plot, or the characters. As far as I am concerned, this is another terrific story in the Joe Leaphorn/Jim Chee series by Tony Hillerman. Joe is a retired Navajo Tribal Police Lieutenant, who over the past few years since retirement has found several puzzles to keep him occupied. The latest is a photo sent to him by his friend Mel Bork of an old Navajo rug that is up for auction. Problem is, the rug was burned long ago in a fire, the same fire that killed a criminal Joe was after. It's a case that was never solved, and when Mel Bork disappears, Joe digs into it once again. As always, there is a wealth of cultural information, especially regarding the shapeshifter legends, and the usual breathtaking scenery that Tony paints so well in the imagination.

posted by Anonymous on November 29, 2007

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

Yet another disappointment from Tony Hillerman

After reading Tony Hillerman's latest effort, The Shape Shifter, it's hard to believe this is the work of the same author who gave us such compelling mysteries as The Blessing Way, People of Darkness, and Listening Woman. Once again, Hillerman has given us not a myster...
After reading Tony Hillerman's latest effort, The Shape Shifter, it's hard to believe this is the work of the same author who gave us such compelling mysteries as The Blessing Way, People of Darkness, and Listening Woman. Once again, Hillerman has given us not a mystery--readers will figure out everything in the first third of the book--but another white-man adventure set in Indian Country. Underlying the story is the author's attempt to educate the reader about the parallels of the infamous Long March of the Navajos and the sad fate of the Laotian Hmong. As background, the material is interesting, but the narrative on the Hmong runs on to the point where it breaks the pace of the story. To say that the plot is predictable is an understatement. Hillerman's last five Leaphorn-Chee novels have all been weakly plotted adventures rather than mysteries--the loss, I'm afraid, is ours. And to add to the disappointment, both the author and his editor display some carelessness: Joe Leaphorn, as fans of the series know, lives in Window Rock, Arizona, the Navajo capital. In this book, he arrives at his Window Rock home early on (page 17), but subsequently, his domicile is identified as Shiprock, which is a town in New Mexico a hundred miles away. Which is it, Tony?

posted by Anonymous on December 10, 2006

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  • Posted August 21, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Repetitive

    CD/Abridged/Mystery: This was the second Joe Leaphorn mystery. In this one, Joe Leaphorn, retired, tries to settle an old mystery that has been bothering him since his rookie days. I could recite you Leaphorn's theory of the crime, since he repeats the pinion sap theory numerous times. It does become very repetitive by the fourth or fifth time. You do feel for Leaphorn. He is in his second month or so of retirement and he is bored. It was likeable and listenable, but I really don't recommend it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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