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Siblings Without Rivalry: How to Help Your Children Live Together So You Can Live Too

Average Rating 3.5
( 22 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2000

    A Great Book!

    I recommend this book to anyone raising more than one child. Well written, easy to digest with lots of ideas! To the authors: Thank you for this book! It's rare that I find a parenting book that I recommend.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 7, 2014

    I was hopeful about this book as it was the only one carried loc

    I was hopeful about this book as it was the only one carried locally on the topic and I didn't want to order online for another. Sadly, the entire book is a series of comments made during an imaginary parenting support group, not an ongoing discussion of issues, root causes, etc. The author's solution to parents' many complaints is often cartoon drawings of "not this...but this". Tidbits are offered throughout the text, however not one piece of advice is unique to parents of quarelling children...this is basic parenting. For example, her most useful piece of advice is "don't compare your children". I don't mind that I wasted money on this book, but I do mind that I wasted the time reading it. For what it's worth, if you have absolutely no idea how to parent mulitple children and didn't grow up with other children around, this book might be helpful.

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  • Posted December 29, 2013

    How This Book Works  Siblings Without Rivalry follows a set of

    How This Book Works 

    Siblings Without Rivalry follows a set of parents in group sessions with the instructor/authors. At first, I thought it was a lazy way to write a book; after a short introduction the narrative reads like a dictation of parenting group sessions. It's not, of course, it's a thoughtful distillation of their experiences teaching sibling relationship sessions to many groups of parents. As I read, I found the parents' stories and conversations moving. The parents asked nearly every question that popped into my head, which was accompanied by a satisfying response. It was also comforting to read accounts of other parents making the same mistakes I have, and being just as clueless as I am about what to do. 

    The following is the outline and an example of the type of advice in that chapter. 

    Brothers and Sisters Past and Present 
    This chapter asks parents to record sibling conflicts, and sets expectations for what you can achieve as a parent. 
    Example: In response to one woman's statement about wanting her kids to be friends, the author replies with her own story, “‘Instead of worrying about the boys becoming friends,’ I explained, ‘I began to think about how to equip them with the attitudes and skills they'd need for all their caring relationships.’” Brilliant. 

    Not Till the Bad Feelings Come Out 
    Listening to your child complain about the troll that is their sibling, and acknowledging their feelings, is a very healing process. 
    “Insisting on good feelings between siblings led to bad feelings. Acknowledging bad feeling between siblings led to good feelings.” 
    Other emotional skills are important such as, naming feelings, and reflecting back to the child what they are feeling so they know you understand, for example, “You seem to be feeling angry that Gabi took your stick horse without asking.” 

    Perils of Comparisons 
    Even if you don't actively compare your kids to one another, “Why can’t you be more like your brother?” The water is murky, for example praising one child within earshot of the other can feel like a put down to the other child. 
    Another insightful example: when a mother praised one of her child's improvement in math, the other gloated about her even better grade. The mother could have responded by saying, “There's no report card contest going on here… …I want to sit down with each of you individually to…” Then follow through giving each child your full attention and focusing your discuss on that child’s individual progress. 

    Equal is Less 
    Personally, I have railed against trying to be fair, and right from the start didn't tolerate, “She has more!” and “I want one too!!” However, just because I didn't tolerate it, didn't stop either child from feeling slighted if I didn't provide duplicates of everything. Now I have some new tools for working with this. I have added, “Everybody gets what she needs. I'm not worried about what anybody else has, if you need more, you can have more,” to my parenting mantras. Or I might say, “Eat what you have first, then if you need more there is plenty here for whomever needs it.” I still don't count and measure, and the girls are more relaxed knowing their needs will be met. 
    This chapter was also important for answering the, “You love Gabi more!” accusation. Instead of angry rebuttals, I now reply by telling Danielle all the things I love about her, and how much she means to me. I don't mention Gabi at all. She glows. She hasn't said that since I read this book. 

    Siblings in Roles 
    How often has, “This is Danielle, my little artist, and this is my monkey climber girl, Gabi” rolled off my tongue? It's so easy to cast kids in roles. I always thought I was praising a strength, but in reality I'm limiting my kids' potential. By labeling Danielle “The Artist”, she thinks that art is the only thing she's good out and resists branching out. Also, it could also limit Gabi's interest in art. Or worse, what if by some freak of talent, Gabi becomes a better artist than Danielle? Then Gabi will have taken Danielle's identity as “The Artist”. I've re-trained myself to introduce them as my daughter, Danielle, and my daughter, Gabrielle. That's it. They get to decide who, and what they are. I also have to guard against other people labeling them; I try to always say, “Yep, she likes to climb, but can do so many other amazing things too, like, color, make funny faces, tell a funny joke… She told me this one the other day… 

    Out of their earshot, I love to compare and contrast my kids' abilities and personalities. It helps me get a handle on them as individuals. 

    When Kids Fight 
    The first piece of advice is to do nothing. Weird, but what a relief! If it escalates, in my house it usually does, then the best thing to do is describe what you see without passing any kind of judgement. Kids are notoriously self centered, making it difficult to understand a sibling's intentions or point of view. Add to that the heat of conflict… Kaboom! 
    A parent can come into a dispute, hear and reflect each side in a way that both kids can understand, and them let them work out a solution. 
    Example: 
    Me: “Wow you guys sound upset.” 
    Danielle: “Gabi has my favorite necklace, and she's going to break it!” 
    Me: “You're worried that Gabi will break your necklace. It is really pretty, Gabi must really like it.” 
    Danielle: *calmer* “Yeah, but it's mine. And she's going to break it.” 
    Gabi: “No, it's actually MINE!” (It is not, of course, but Danielle has programmed this one into her stock phrases cache.) 
    Me: “Gabi, that necklace belongs to Danielle. She's worried that it might get broken.” 
    Gabi: “I want to wear it!” 
    Me: “Danielle, what can we do here?” 
    Danielle: “That one is my favorite, but she can wear this other one.” 
    Gabi: “Thank you, sis-ter.” 
    This actually happened. REALLY. 
    When I come in and describe what I see, show respect for Danielle's property rights, she might unlock her position and shift into finding a solution that Gabi will be happy with too. Gabi is a bit little to understand the nuances of what went on, but I also try to coach her by giving her things to say and ways of asking that doesn't trigger Danielle's volatile temperament. It is no small feat, and takes a lot of self-control on my part, because something is usually cooking on the stove, or the phone is ringing, but as I'm teaching them, I'm also learning how to focus and respectfully interact with them. 

    Making Peace With the Past 
    One woman spoke of how she was continually compared to her sister in an unfavorable light, and how it still affected her to this day. Through these sessions, she began to realize that these comparisons probably caused some suffering for her sister too, and she decided to call her. 
    “Then she told me how sorry she was for the pain she must have caused me, and how much it meant to her that I had called, and that if I hadn't, we might have gone to our graves without ever knowing each other. Then I started to cry.” 
    I endeavor not only to avoid this sort of mistake in raising my girls, I also want them to know what potential they have in each other for a lifelong companion. No one will understand or know the essence of you like a sibling. No one else will witness the trials and triumphs of your formative years from a first hand perspective, one that can actually enhance your understanding of those times. Even your future spouse or children won't be able to know you in

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2012

    This was recommended to me by my 8 year old daughter's therapist

    This was recommended to me by my 8 year old daughter's therapist! LOVE it! So many things that just make sense and make you think "why didn't I already realize this???" I started using the ideas as soon as I started reading it, I am already seeing results! Highly reccommend to all families with more than one child!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Parent support group--in a book.

    A handbook, workshop and reality check all in one. It's a "why didn't I think of that" and an "I'm glad I have that tool now" kind of parenting guide.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2007

    It's working!

    I wish I had read this book years ago! It is an easy and entertaining read. Each chapter taught a specific skill and assigned 'homework'. I noticed a huge difference right away- within a day. The frequency of the kids' fights diminished,the intensity of their fights weakened, and they started to work out their own problems. I feel more confident in my parenting and proud that my children are learning problem solving skills. I'm recognizing that the kids are developing skills that will lead them to healthy relationships in their adulthood. I've learned how I have been fueling their fights in the past. How not to take sides and cast my children in damaging roles. We are a happier family all around! Of all my parenting 'how-to' books, this has been my favorite!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2005

    fantastic!!!!!!!!!

    I had such a great time reading this book. Easy to read and has examples that everybody can relate to. When you have more than one child, parents really need some help getting the kids to get along,this book has real examples and real advice you can follow. This book is a great resource. Fantastic, highly recommend it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2002

    Sensible advice from a book that has become a true classic

    This book has given us so many ideas to try with our three young children (ages 5, 3, and 2 months). I really like the way all of the strategies maintain the dignitiy of both the parent and the child. When I am able to resist "automatic parenting" reactions that aren't working anyway...like yelling, threatening, criticizing, and bribing and use some of the great suggestions in this book, I feel so much more effective and proud of myself as a parent. Because I have 3 very young children, I would like to also recommend a new pocketsized book that has been extremely helpful to me with my specific sibling issues. Appropriately entitled "The Pocket Parent", it is written exclusively for parents with 2's, 3's, 4's, and 5's. There are a number of pertinent chapters relating to sibs... "the new baby", "comparing and labeling", "sibling rivalry", "hitting and hurting others", "biting", "bad words", "I hate you's", "power struggles", and "traveling with the kids". These two books with exactly the same philosophy compliment each other--both having many great examples of the exact words to use in many sibling situations. One of the best things I learned from both books is to stop trying to "be fair", but instead to try to meet each child's needs. For example, if you tried your best to serve same sized pancakes to the kids and your son immediately screams that his sister's pancakes are much bigger and better than his...instead of going nuts and yelling back that he's absolutely wrong as you take your ruler out to prove it...you just need to take a deep breath and say calmly, "Mmmmm, sounds like you're still hungry, honey...how about two more pancakes just for you!! GREAT ADVICE...and it works!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2002

    easy reading

    The book came highly recommended from friends. Admittedly, I was skeptical since they have the most mixed up children in our circle. The principles are based on active listening and communication techniques combined with remembering that children are foremost people. For me, it was a good reminder to use my office communication skills at home.

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