Customer Reviews for

Silver Bells: A Holiday Tale

Average Rating 4.5
( 23 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(14)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 review with 2 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2006

    The Basic Color of Bells

    ¿Silver Bells¿ is a story on a tree farmer, Christopher ¿Christy¿ Byrne, from Nova Scotia whose son Danny runs away from him in New York City, and falls in love with a librarian, Catherine Tierney, who secretly helps and cares for Christy¿s teenage son. The premise of the story lies on the idea that it is often up to a man to determine whether his plans in life are for the best or the worst even if they may seem unreasonable or irrational. In this case, it was up to Danny Byrne who determined that his plans in life were for the best even if his father thought it irrational. Christy and Catherine are both dynamic and can also be marked as antagonists in the beginning of the novel. Christy, a widower, began his hate for Christmas ever since his son ran away the year before. Catherine, also a widow, started detesting Christmas ever since her dearly loved husband died a quick death from a sickness three years prior. Although she played a minor role in the story, Catherine¿s best friend Lizzie, on the other hand, can be labeled the protagonist in the novel. She was able to bring Catherine out of her anger towards Christmas, who, once out of her anger, was able to see the beauty of it. One major conflict that took place in the novel was when Catherine quietly reveals that she has been taking care of Christy¿s son for the past year. Christy finds himself outraged at the idea that he trusted this woman he now loved. He could not believe that she did not even, at the least, tell him that his son was doing all right when Christy would daily go out every night to search for his missing son. As the novel progressed, the son eventually shows himself but gets into an accident. There were silver bells on the photograph his girlfriend was holding on the day he got hurt and this was shown throughout the news in New York City. The location of these bells was the irony in the novel. The bells became some sort of a legend and everyone wanted to know where these bells were located. I do not find any interest in this book for the story was a simple romantic Christmas tale. There wasn¿t anything about the novel that made it appealing or exceptional in comparison to the many other books listed on the New York Times¿ Bestseller Booklist. Why did I choose to read it? I wanted to give myself a chance to read a contemporary romantic novel.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 review with 2 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1