Customer Reviews for

Simplicity Parenting: Using the Extraordinary Power of Less to Raise Calmer, Happier, and More Secure Kids

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 18 of 17 Customer Reviews
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  • Posted August 8, 2011

    WHERE WAS THIS BOOK WHEN I WAS IN EDUCATION ?

    Not only do I recommend this to any teacher, counselor, clergy, parent, grandparent or anyone who works with or for children this is a MUST read. I can literally think of hundreds of children that wouldn't have been put on drugs and so many families that could have simplified their lives and allowed their children childhoods the enjoyed. I have found it in every library I have checked. It is ebook, hardbound, and paperbook. Read the sample and see what you think.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 24, 2011

    most significant parenting book i've read

    i'm a homeschooling mother of 7 (12 and under) with a degree in early childhood education. my educational philosophy is constructivist based. even with my passion for education and child-rearing, i've struggled to give my children the childhood i think they deserve and feel is best for them. out of professional and personal interest, i've read a lot of parenting, child development, and education books. this is HANDS DOWN my all-time favorite book on childhood and parenting.

    dr. payne is informative, making many sound & well-supported arguments for his views on how childhood should be protected and nurtured. he is encouraging and inspirational to the parent reader, giving them confidence and renewed faith in themselves as a parent capable of doing what is best for their child and the knowledge of what that truly is. this book will give you the courage to politely and simply say "no, thanks" to all those things you aren't comfortable with but feel pressured to do for your child in our overloaded, hurried up world.

    the writing is engaging, soothing, gentle, friendly and very readable in an intelligent way. i appreciate the "put simply" bullet points through out the text that highlight key points.

    i can not overstate how much i genuinely love this book! i have already purchased and given away an additional 16 copies to family and friends in the past month. currently, i am reading it aloud to my husband. already i have been able to use dr. payne's reasoning to convince my husband of changes i've wanted to make to our family life for years.

    thank you, thank you, thank you dr. payne. i can't say it enough.

    READ AND LIVE THIS BOOK!!! you won't regret it.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 17, 2010

    SIMPLICITY PARENTING by Kim John Payne and Lisa M. Ross -- "Simply Genius"

    If you are a parent or educator, get this book. If you child is having any symptoms associated with ADHD or OCD, or suffering from stresses and anxiety, take a look at this book. I highly recommend it.

    The author posits that changes to the home environment can help alleviate some of the child's suffering that are a product of the particular stresses of our times. Payne and Ross offer simple, practical but radical recommendations: reduce the number of scheduled activities a child is involved in, remove clutter and an overabundance of toys from the home, dramatically decrease the flow of information (especially news and grown-up topics) a child is exposed to, reduce or eliminate screen time (tv, computer, video games), allow time for unstructured play, set up predictable and consistent rhythms and routines in the home and throughout the week; these are just some of the practical tips author Kim Payne and Lisa Ross advise.

    Better yet, they back it up with data. Payne provides both anecdotal evidence from his many years as a school and family counselor, and with hard data as a researcher. The book details promising evidence that addressing environmental and structural changes in a child's home, family life, and school, can lead to a greater than 60% improvement of symptoms of attention-related difficulties in children. I loved this book and would like to see more from these authors.

    Best of all is the book's reframing of a child's "quirks" or tics -- that we, as parents and teachers, might consider handicaps or things to medicate away or suppress -- as indicators of a child's special gifts and talents -- clues to a child's particular "genius". It reminds me of the quote Einstein is reported to have said: "Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid."

    SIMPLICITY PARENTING is a great handbook for parents and educators who are interested in helping children move toward and embrace their gifts.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2009

    Excellent book for parents looking to create the best environment for their children

    This book very clearly states the theory and practical application for parents wanting to create a meaningful home environment for their children. It gives practical ideas for those wanting to make small or big changes and is not overwelming. This is a must read for all parents raising children in our current society of more toys, more media, more activities, etc and clearly explains how to create balance in their lives.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2013

    How to Parent? Kim Payne¿s, and Lisa Ross¿ Simplicity Parenting:

    How to Parent?
    Kim Payne’s, and Lisa Ross’ Simplicity Parenting: Using the Extraordinary Power of Less to Raise Calmer, Happier, and More Secure Kids is about the right, and wrong ways to raise kids. As Payne, and Ross tell their own personal stories of dealing with kids they teach the reader in a non-bullet pointing way how to raise a young kid. It also deals with the problem of kids condition suck as ADHD, and ADD. This best seller deals with how Payne is part of, and experiment in the simplification of drug free ADD, and ADHD. For these reasons Simplicity Parenting: Using the Extraordinary Power of Less to Raise Calmer, Happier, and More Secure Kids is a best seller.
    The only part of the book that I like is when Payne and Ross explained their firsthand experiences. If they would have used more firsthand experiences I would have liked the book more. For example, Payne talked about a boy, James, who couldn’t find any friends. His parents took away his computer, television, and all hos video game machines. It was unplanned, but James got a friend after his parents confiscated all the items he liked. I really liked reading that part of the book because that is what I was expecting out of the book.
    When I first got the book I was expecting to read about the clients that Payne, and Ross dealt with, and the first few pages were. I really enjoyed the first few pages because of the people they dealt with. After reading about the problems I lost interest in the book because I didn’t care about how to parent because I don’t have a kid to take care of. I wouldn’t recommend Simplicity Parenting: Using the Extraordinary Power of Less to Raise Calmer, Happier, and More Secure Kids to anyone in my grade because they aren’t parents. I choose the wrong book to read, but I really had a struggle reading the book because of how boring the book is.
    To read the book the reader has to have a purpose, which I didn’t. For example a new to be mother might want to read the book on how to be a good parent, and raise their kids. The only purpose I had to read this book was to read about it and write a book report on it. My purpose for reading the book wasn’t good enough because I didn’t have a personal reason for reading the book. I believe that is the reason for me not liking the book.
    Payne, and Ross really mentioned a lot about two working parents, and it’s wrong because some parents might not have a partner with them or that works. Payne shouldn’t put so much emphasizes on the fact of two working parent because a lot of people have one parent that they spend most of their time with. It was really difficult to read the book at those points of the book, and I had to take a break from reading, and continue on like 10 minutes later. Little parts that talked about the parents were interesting to read about, but most of them weren’t, and I would have loved to read more about interesting parts about parents.
    Payne, and Ross also involved a lot about ADHD, and ADD. I don’t believe a lot of parents have kids with ADHA, and ADD. I know people with ADHD, but the book shouldn’t involve all the details it does about ADD, and ADHD because not as many parents have to detail with it as the book shows. This book could help parents control their kids with ADD or ADHD but it won’t help most of the population of the parents. I wouldn’t recommend the book to parents with kids with ADD or ADHD because they have special books for parents with those children.
    The tone of the book was really soothing because the book was written by parents. The book should have had a soothing tone because a parent might be really mad or sad because they cannot control their child’s behaviour and they don’t want the book to make them any madder. The book could make a parent mad because of all the information about ADHD, and ADD.
    RyanA

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted September 8, 2010

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    Posted September 23, 2010

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    Posted January 5, 2011

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    Posted June 13, 2011

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    Posted March 30, 2010

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    Posted February 22, 2012

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