Customer Reviews for

Sins of the House of Borgia

Average Rating 3.5
( 92 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(29)

4 Star

(21)

3 Star

(27)

2 Star

(8)

1 Star

(7)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

Most Helpful Favorable Review

5 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

This is an engaging look at the Borgia family

In the year 5252 which the Christians call 1492, King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella give the Jews three months to leave. Many like the Sarfati family in Toledo decide to relocate to the city-states of Italy where the despotic rulers are tolerant towards Jews and wary of...
In the year 5252 which the Christians call 1492, King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella give the Jews three months to leave. Many like the Sarfati family in Toledo decide to relocate to the city-states of Italy where the despotic rulers are tolerant towards Jews and wary of Ferdinand. The Sarfati father and his three sons move ahead to Rome where the patriarch helps finance Rodrigo Borgia efforts to become the next Pope. The females followed but the matriarch died before finishing the journey leaving her six years old daughter Esther travelling to Rome to join her father.

Almost a decade later Borgia as Pope Alexander VI returns the support he received from Sarfati by allowing Esther a chance to join his daughter Lucrezia's retinue if she converts. Although Esther has doubts, her father convinces her to accept the terms. As Lucrezia marries Alfonso d'Este, Esther converts to Christianity and becomes a lady-in-waiting known as La Violante. Lucrezia thinks highly of La Violante and her cousin Angela Borgia becomes her friend; while Lucrezia's brother Cesare stirs her heart.

This is an engaging look at the Borgia family through the rosy colored eyes of an innocent individual who must adapt to a world of backstabbing deadly passion or die. Cesare owns the story line as he never allows his heart or soul get in the way of his machinations. Lucrezia pales next to her sibling; as she does not seem to measure up to her brother on the viciousness scale. Filled with betrayal, readers will enjoy the Book of Esther as La Violante tells how paradise was lost and regained when she learned to trust no one not even those she thought loved her.

Harriet Klausner

posted by harstan on February 22, 2011

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review

Most Helpful Critical Review

4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

A little hard at first

I LOVE historical fiction and I've read the Borgia Bride so I was hopeful that I would love this book. Don't get me wrong, it was a good story line and I'd say overall I enjoyed the book. I would say more than "Love" I "Liked" it. By the time I got to the end I didn't w...
I LOVE historical fiction and I've read the Borgia Bride so I was hopeful that I would love this book. Don't get me wrong, it was a good story line and I'd say overall I enjoyed the book. I would say more than "Love" I "Liked" it. By the time I got to the end I didn't want it to end...but I didn't get to that point until the middle. The book was a little hard to get into and there were so many characters they were hard to keep track of (like, who was married to who and who was brothers with who, etc.). I've been to Rome so I really enjoyed when she described certain landmarks (Castel St.Angelo, for example) because it was easy to visualize where they were...but had I not been there it would have been hard to imagine. I was absolutely disappointed in the end. It almost felt like she didn't know how to end it so she just threw something together...and since I had become so "attached" to La Violante I was disappointed that it ended so abruptly. La Violante is a great main character as I think she is pretty easy to relate to.

posted by AHeath on August 14, 2011

Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 29 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 2
  • Posted February 22, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    This is an engaging look at the Borgia family

    In the year 5252 which the Christians call 1492, King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella give the Jews three months to leave. Many like the Sarfati family in Toledo decide to relocate to the city-states of Italy where the despotic rulers are tolerant towards Jews and wary of Ferdinand. The Sarfati father and his three sons move ahead to Rome where the patriarch helps finance Rodrigo Borgia efforts to become the next Pope. The females followed but the matriarch died before finishing the journey leaving her six years old daughter Esther travelling to Rome to join her father.

    Almost a decade later Borgia as Pope Alexander VI returns the support he received from Sarfati by allowing Esther a chance to join his daughter Lucrezia's retinue if she converts. Although Esther has doubts, her father convinces her to accept the terms. As Lucrezia marries Alfonso d'Este, Esther converts to Christianity and becomes a lady-in-waiting known as La Violante. Lucrezia thinks highly of La Violante and her cousin Angela Borgia becomes her friend; while Lucrezia's brother Cesare stirs her heart.

    This is an engaging look at the Borgia family through the rosy colored eyes of an innocent individual who must adapt to a world of backstabbing deadly passion or die. Cesare owns the story line as he never allows his heart or soul get in the way of his machinations. Lucrezia pales next to her sibling; as she does not seem to measure up to her brother on the viciousness scale. Filled with betrayal, readers will enjoy the Book of Esther as La Violante tells how paradise was lost and regained when she learned to trust no one not even those she thought loved her.

    Harriet Klausner

    5 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2011

    Loved It

    My mother got me this book because we're into the show on Showtime. I really enjoyed this book, I never wanted
    to put it down!!! The beginning was a little rocky but other than that it was really good. Im not a big read but Im glad I read this book. Next Im going to read The Borgia Bride...


    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 18, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Very Interesting Portrayal

    I was interested in the upcoming series so I decided to read Bowers interpretation. Her descriptions of the what went on intrigued me and she kept me wanting to know more. The characters were well developed and though at times the main character's niavete bothered me, I had to realize the times. So again she did an excellent job of making you see through her eyes. Great Read. Looking forward to reading more from this author.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2014

    Marlin

    ((Nevermind anyway. I thought this was the Eros cabin.))

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2014

    Herb

    [XD]

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2014

    Marissa

    "Sure..."

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 5, 2011

    Disturbing

    Complicated storyline. Rivetting and disturbing.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 15, 2011

    Totally not my normal genre

    But i loved it!!!! It sucked me in, i picked my fav characters then changed favs and fell in love then despised them, i have been recommending this to everyone!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 28, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    An epic tale about the notorious Borgia family

    Sins of the House of Borgia is an epic historical fiction novel of the infamous Borgia family who rose to power in fifteenth century Italy. The story is narrated by a young Jewish girl named Esther who is forced to leave Spain when the Jews are expelled. She flees to her father in Italy who uses her for his own political advancement. He urges her to relinquish her Jewish faith and be baptized as a Catholic in order to place her as a lady in waiting for Lucrezia Borgia. Lucrezia stands as Esther's godmother.

    The illegitimate daughter of depraved Pope Alexander VI, Lucrezia Borgia's court is one of decadence and secrets. Violante soon encounters the alluring and callous Cesare, Duke of Valentinois and Romagna, Lucrezia's old brother, and falls desperately in love with him. After a horse race, Cesare renames her Violante, breaker of promises. As the relationship with Cesare progresses, Violante relinquishes her virginity to him, which resulted in two unanticipated results - she becomes pregnant and contracts a dose of the pox.

    The world has always been fascinated with the wickedly corrupt Borgia family and many books have been written about them. What makes this novel stand apart is that it is told through the eyes of an innocent Jewish woman trapped at the center of numerous intrigues. As a result of her connections to the Borgias, she is caught up in the family's troubles, forfeits all family ties, and suffers great losses.

    Sins of the House of Borgia is a riveting, scandalous historical fiction novel with shocking characters and an intricate plot. The book is rich in detail, the times brought to life skilfully and with accuracy. Sarah Bower skilfully draws her readers into the abundantly vivid world of Renaissance Italy. This opulently gratifying story immerses the reader into the rich lives of the characters. It is a dazzling, breathtaking read - one worth savouring, which I very much recommend.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 29 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 2