Customer Reviews for

Sisterhood of Dune

Average Rating 4
( 47 )
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(18)

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(6)

2 Star

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

2 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

Probably a good book, can't read it yet.

Being asked to review a book more than two weeks before it is published is hilarious. Don't you love computers ! GIGO ( garbage in, garbage out...)

posted by Penzoil3 on December 18, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

19 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

The Last Dune Novel I will Read

I have been a Dune fan since the early 1970s and loved all of Frank Herberts Dune Novels and was excited when it was announced that the series would continue in 1999 with Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson in the helm. The novels were all entertaining and many I enjoyed a...
I have been a Dune fan since the early 1970s and loved all of Frank Herberts Dune Novels and was excited when it was announced that the series would continue in 1999 with Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson in the helm. The novels were all entertaining and many I enjoyed as audio books during by long commutes. However, there the spirit of the orignal Herbert novels was missing in the new books. Frank Herbert was the master of suspension of dis-belief. I fully beleived that a society could evolve without computers and yet still have some technology elements like star ships and force fields. This was accomplished by maximizing the capabilities of human beings thorugh special training or forced evolution that created Mentats, Sisters, Suk Doctors, and celestial navigators who all excell at their craft witout technology. Where the new novels missed the boat is there is too much technology and it actually negates Frank Herberts original conception. For example, in the House Atreides to House Corrino novel we, the Suk Doctor, Wellington Yueh, rebuilds one of the characters into a cyborg; this made no sense and the Frank Herbert novels that were supposed to be the sequels of these novels, make absolutely no reference to cyborg-like being and they would in fact be forbidden as "machines in the form of man." What Brian Herbert and and Kevin Anderson completely miss is that Frank Herbert reveled in the unlimited capabilities of the physical and mental capabilites of humans; even without our machines we could still build a galactic empire, and this was all done in a believable fashion. Now, the lastest Dune Novel: Sisterhood of Dune, the authors throw everything out that made Frank Herbert's Dune Universe the beleivable word it was. We find out that the Sisterhood and Mentats actually depended on "secret" computers to acheive greatness (a big "Excuse Me" on this!). Don't the the authors realize that this completely negates Frank's first novel. Ans, by the end of Sisterhood, the Great Schools seem to be fully evolved. We have Sisters and Mentats all over the Imperium supporting the Great Houses; we have Reverend Mothers with all of their powers, we have CHOAM, we have what appears to be an almost fully evolved Imperial Family and the politic that existing in the Frank's first Novel. The problem I have is that this novel take place only 100 years after the Butlerian Jihad and nearly 10,000 years before the setting of the very first Dune Novel. We are expected to believe that the complex machineless society that Frank Herbert envisioned in the first Dune novel evolved in just 100 years and then just remained stagnant for the next 10,000. Perhaps, Brian and Kevin will explain that in the next book, but I won't be there. This book is just Anderson and the younger Herbert cashing in on the Dune Franchise by giving us more of the same, but in this novel, it make little sense.

posted by ApocolypticJourney on February 11, 2012

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  • Posted February 11, 2012

    The Last Dune Novel I will Read

    I have been a Dune fan since the early 1970s and loved all of Frank Herberts Dune Novels and was excited when it was announced that the series would continue in 1999 with Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson in the helm. The novels were all entertaining and many I enjoyed as audio books during by long commutes. However, there the spirit of the orignal Herbert novels was missing in the new books. Frank Herbert was the master of suspension of dis-belief. I fully beleived that a society could evolve without computers and yet still have some technology elements like star ships and force fields. This was accomplished by maximizing the capabilities of human beings thorugh special training or forced evolution that created Mentats, Sisters, Suk Doctors, and celestial navigators who all excell at their craft witout technology. Where the new novels missed the boat is there is too much technology and it actually negates Frank Herberts original conception. For example, in the House Atreides to House Corrino novel we, the Suk Doctor, Wellington Yueh, rebuilds one of the characters into a cyborg; this made no sense and the Frank Herbert novels that were supposed to be the sequels of these novels, make absolutely no reference to cyborg-like being and they would in fact be forbidden as "machines in the form of man." What Brian Herbert and and Kevin Anderson completely miss is that Frank Herbert reveled in the unlimited capabilities of the physical and mental capabilites of humans; even without our machines we could still build a galactic empire, and this was all done in a believable fashion. Now, the lastest Dune Novel: Sisterhood of Dune, the authors throw everything out that made Frank Herbert's Dune Universe the beleivable word it was. We find out that the Sisterhood and Mentats actually depended on "secret" computers to acheive greatness (a big "Excuse Me" on this!). Don't the the authors realize that this completely negates Frank's first novel. Ans, by the end of Sisterhood, the Great Schools seem to be fully evolved. We have Sisters and Mentats all over the Imperium supporting the Great Houses; we have Reverend Mothers with all of their powers, we have CHOAM, we have what appears to be an almost fully evolved Imperial Family and the politic that existing in the Frank's first Novel. The problem I have is that this novel take place only 100 years after the Butlerian Jihad and nearly 10,000 years before the setting of the very first Dune Novel. We are expected to believe that the complex machineless society that Frank Herbert envisioned in the first Dune novel evolved in just 100 years and then just remained stagnant for the next 10,000. Perhaps, Brian and Kevin will explain that in the next book, but I won't be there. This book is just Anderson and the younger Herbert cashing in on the Dune Franchise by giving us more of the same, but in this novel, it make little sense.

    19 out of 21 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 20, 2012

    Milking the cash cow

    The authors should be ashamed of themselves....picking up ideas off the cutting room floor and combining them in a "book". There was no reason to publish this swill except greed. Dune lovers beware.

    6 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 23, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    First let me say I love the Dune books, and the Herbert/Anderson

    First let me say I love the Dune books, and the Herbert/Anderson collaborations have all been brilliant... BUT, my issue is with the NOOK version of this book... all was fine until I got past page 250, then I started to notice pages were missing here and there, sometimes as many as three or four per chapter... hopefully this is something the publisher will fix before any more people waste their money on an e-copy of a very good book.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2012

    Obviously more to come.

    There are so many active plot lines left open that it seens a bit like the end of Chapterhouse.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 15, 2013

    Useful Information

    Worth reading for fans of the entire Dune Series. It contains useful information and is somewhat entertaining. For me it was the worst of the Herbert/Anderson offerings, but still worth reading.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2013

    Wonderful read. One of the best of the series

    One of the best of the Dune Series, and I have read them all.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 24, 2012

    Good read

    I didnt like this the first time i read it. Now that i have read it in chronological order of the series it is better. The sisterhood history is twisted even at its roots. Nice to know their history and have answers to so many questions.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 30, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    I love all the books in the Dune series, but this isn’t on

    I love all the books in the Dune series, but this isn’t one of my favorites. I was hoping this novel would focus more strictly on “The Sisterhood” as the title suggests. Instead, a lot of the attention goes to Vorian Atreides, the Mentat School, and the on-going Butlerian Movement to destroy all thinking machines. These are interesting facets of the story, but again, I thought the book would be mostly about the Bene Gesserit. The novels ending suggest that at least one more sequel is planned, if not a third. I look forward to them, as I feel the story was left quite incomplete. For all its short-comings, I still enjoyed reading this. Any addition to the Dune saga is always a pleasure.
    Michael Travis Jasper, author of the novel “To Be Chosen”

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 18, 2011

    Probably a good book, can't read it yet.

    Being asked to review a book more than two weeks before it is published is hilarious. Don't you love computers ! GIGO ( garbage in, garbage out...)

    2 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2013

    The story carries on.

    Excellent collaboration and story telling in true Herbert style. I really liked this story and it caused me to read more of their work.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2013

    loved it

    A great read I hope to see more of the same. There were to many areas left unfinished, this story isn't done yet! I loved the
    story and if people will keep ab opsn mind

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 4, 2012

    Solid book in the 2nd generation Dune series

    Continues on the success, style, and quality of the past efforts of the Herbert/Anderson team. If you liked the others and the Dune universe than it is worth your time for sure.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2012

    Does not disapoint

    This is a great book. It allows you to revisit your favorite characters from the legends trilogy. It also offers great new story lines that stand on their own.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2012

    McDune fails again

    These cheap genre fiction cash-ins really are a disgrace to the original Dune series. Make them stop, please!

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2012

    Only average

    Could not tell if this is the beginning of a series or if they just got bored and quit writing. Enjoyed the parts about the sister but this book really deals with the events after the Butlerian jihad. I wish there was more about the spave navigators. Interesting about the way they came to be.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 31, 2011

    Very creative writer!

    Mr. Anderson, once again, writes so you feel like you're experiencing the action. Very fun reading.

    1 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2014

    Fun

    This book, set in the year 5 BG(12,995 AD), was a fun and quick read. However, this only the first book in the Great Schools of Dune trilogy, and to tell you the truth, I'm not sure this needs 3 books. All 5 great schools have their origin told in this one book and yet there are 3 left to go. Still, I enjoyed reading and novel and would stilreccommend it.
    -A 94 %

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2012

    Highly recommended, DUNE series.

    One of the great DUNE series.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 10, 2012

    Loyal Dune Fan

    Not as good as the rest of the new Dune series, but it is still Dune! Keep them coming guys

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2012

    Enjoyable

    I really enjoyed the opportunity to explore more of the history of the Butlerian Jihad. Reading this book makes me think there may be a sequal

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