Customer Reviews for

Slave: The Hidden Truth About Your Identity in Christ

Average Rating 4.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

A must read!

Don't pay any attention to the bad reviews! This is an excellent book! John Macarthur shows the truth about Christianity! The truth is we are slaves to Christ. Sound heretical? Read the book. It will change your life! It did mine!

posted by Lee72 on December 13, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Not bad - not amazing

john macarthur's Slave (a review)

To begin, I must say that I usually enter into these types of works with a very critical eye. So, I need to address the good feature of the book before I become too critical. First, it makes a great study group book. In a culture ...
john macarthur's Slave (a review)

To begin, I must say that I usually enter into these types of works with a very critical eye. So, I need to address the good feature of the book before I become too critical. First, it makes a great study group book. In a culture that doesn't know limits or boundaries when it comes to self indulgence and consumption, Slave addresses again the humble state we have in light of grand mercy of God. I would recommend it for church study groups, home groups etc. It the book is not complicated in its nature and hold several helpful insights for the Christian church.

Now, two points of frustration. First, I was quite surprised that there were no sections devoted to the exposition of clear passages dealing with slavery and ownership. Why wasn't Philemon discussed? Why not an exposition of the way slavery set out in the OT [I can only remember at this late point, that they address the redemption of Israel and don't get into the messy-but-interesting stories of slavery of the OT]? There was a lot of depth missed out on because the authors felt it necessary to repeat the same information about slavery in Roman culture over and over again.

Second, and I say this as a trained Reformed theologian. They spent too much time twisting the narrative of the book to explicate the doctrine of election. Reading it, it felt unnatural, and I am of the belief that such doctrines are to be addressed in their proper context. In Slave, a very elaborate discussion of election arose in a moment that felt well out of place. Almost as if election and slavery are synonymous. There was no need to force Calvinism into the story line, and it was clear from the outset.

Slave is certainly useful for groups lead by layleaders and for personal reading.

posted by 8429949 on June 1, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2011

    Not bad - not amazing

    john macarthur's Slave (a review)

    To begin, I must say that I usually enter into these types of works with a very critical eye. So, I need to address the good feature of the book before I become too critical. First, it makes a great study group book. In a culture that doesn't know limits or boundaries when it comes to self indulgence and consumption, Slave addresses again the humble state we have in light of grand mercy of God. I would recommend it for church study groups, home groups etc. It the book is not complicated in its nature and hold several helpful insights for the Christian church.

    Now, two points of frustration. First, I was quite surprised that there were no sections devoted to the exposition of clear passages dealing with slavery and ownership. Why wasn't Philemon discussed? Why not an exposition of the way slavery set out in the OT [I can only remember at this late point, that they address the redemption of Israel and don't get into the messy-but-interesting stories of slavery of the OT]? There was a lot of depth missed out on because the authors felt it necessary to repeat the same information about slavery in Roman culture over and over again.

    Second, and I say this as a trained Reformed theologian. They spent too much time twisting the narrative of the book to explicate the doctrine of election. Reading it, it felt unnatural, and I am of the belief that such doctrines are to be addressed in their proper context. In Slave, a very elaborate discussion of election arose in a moment that felt well out of place. Almost as if election and slavery are synonymous. There was no need to force Calvinism into the story line, and it was clear from the outset.

    Slave is certainly useful for groups lead by layleaders and for personal reading.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 28, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Interesting

    Audio book: "Slave" by John MacArthur
    I have listened to a book called Slave by John MacArthur. In this book MacArthur's point is that as Christians we are slaves to Christ. This is something that has been lost in translations through the years, and many Bible translations rarely use the word "slave" as it is used in the Greek "doulos." Instead the word "servant" is used, which has an entirely different meaning than slave. MacArthur shares a history of slavery and compares human slavery to our role as slaves of Christ. It is rather interesting to note all the similarities. One part I found interesting was the history of John Newton, who wrote the song "Amazing Grace."

    This book is read by the author. He has a pleasant voice and is easy to hear. It always gives a more personal touch to have the author read his own work.


    Thank you to the christianaudio Reviewers Program for providing this audio book to me for my honest review.

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  • Posted January 12, 2011

    Slave--Review

    I recently received Slave, by John MacArthur, from Thomas Nelson for review purposes, and began reading immediately. It's very well-written and clear. It's deep, helpful , and profound. The main point of the book--that we belong to Jesus, not ourselves--is sadly missing from most teachings these days.

    Having said that, there are a couple of things that keep me from recommending it wholeheartedly:

    1. The gist of the book's message is spelled out nicely in the first two chapters. Everything that follows simply expands on the contents of the beginning. Like a Saturday Night Live skit that was great at 5 minutes, but unfunny when made into a 90-minute movie, Slave stretches a great teaching a bit too thin.

    2. The "slave" language is very uncomfortable to me. The author backs up each assertion very well, so I know it's all accurate, but still, the idea of slavery seems like a terrible thing, and I have a hard time getting past that. I'm guessing I'm not the only one. And I am a white guy. I can imagine how an African-American might be even more sensitive to the main point of the book.

    If you can get past those two items, though, it's a good book with the right focus.

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  • Posted December 16, 2010

    Thought Provoking

    An intriguing concept - to consider one's relationship with Christ as one of a Slave/Master. In MacArthur's book, he explores this concept, backing up his thoughts and ideas with many references from the Bible and other scholarly people and sources. A very deep and thought provoking book.

    It took me some time to get into this book. Definitely not for the light reader, it is involved and takes considerable time to thoroughly wade through all of the chapters and give thought to the concepts presented. Also not for the reader looking for a quick read, this book took me considerable time to get through, and I consider myself a fast reader. Deep concepts, many references listed (some taking up half a page), and fairly technical wording make for a slow read.

    While the ideas are challenging and force the Christian reader to look into themselves and they way they view their relationship with Christ, this book also offers personal reflection and challenging thoughts that may not be agreed upon by all. Recommended only to the serious reader with time for reflection, deep thought and conversation about this topic.

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze .com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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