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Smyrna 1922

Average Rating 3.5
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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2007

    A response to my friend

    I'd like to clarify that the destruction of Smyrna is the final outcome of a culmination of events. It all started during WWI when german interests began brain washing the turkish people. Greeks where treated the same way as jews were in WWII and were systematically sent to labour camps or to be more precise death camps. This led to the rise of hatred between Greeks and Turks that lived peacefully and happily together in the past. When Turkey lost the war the greek army, wih the support of the British Government, landed on Smyrna in order to protect the Greek population. But instead they kept pushing onwards led by the ideal of Great Greece and undeniably commited atrocities, burning Turkish villages and pillaging, especially after they started to fall back. But the systematical elimination of the greek and armenian people and the destruction of Smyrna are far more significant than the war time atrocities of the greek army. If you deny that then you certainly dont want to face the truth and will not be able to learn from past mistakes. What I see in the end is the exploitation of two great people, the greeks and the turks, by foreign interests that follow the ancient rule of Divide And Conquer.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2005

    We are the good guys, they are the bad guys!

    This book is a one-sided description of the fire that destroyed portions of the city of Smyrna and of the atrocities perpetrated by Turkish soldiers. It fails to provide a wider context of the massacres and expulsion of Turkish Moslems from Greece proper and the Aegean Islands, the invasion of Anatolia by the Kingdom of Greece, and the massacres and atrocities perpetrated by indigenous Greek civilians and the Greek army, both upon landing at Smyrna in 1919, during is occupation, and during its evacuation.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 30, 2001

    Great story of an unbelievable tragedy

    The Ottoman genocides agains Christian minorities in my opinion was the greatest tragedy of the 20th century. It set a precedent for future genocides that eliminated even more human life. This book is very detailed and very sobering. I believe anybody with an interest in Middle Eastern history will find this story fascinating. The Ottoman massacres are beginning to be better documented and more widely taught. Stories like this help to establish the historical reality in contrast to the Turkish government's attempt to eliminate evidence and facts regarding these events.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2001

    Fascinating Retelling of Forgotten Genocide

    Between 1890 and 1923, more than four million Armenians, Greeks and Nestorian Christians were exterminated by the Ottoman Empire and Young Turks. Now, the last act of this tragedy, the sacking of Smyrna and massacre of her population, comes to life in this amazing book. This is a must read.

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