Customer Reviews for

So Much for That

Average Rating 3.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

Recommended for Book Clubs Everywhere

"so much for that" by Lionel Shriver is a fictional book about serious matters. The book deals with the frustration and the unfairness of dealing with the US healthcare industry.

Shep Knacker has worked hard all his life and pinched every penny to retire in an idylli...
"so much for that" by Lionel Shriver is a fictional book about serious matters. The book deals with the frustration and the unfairness of dealing with the US healthcare industry.

Shep Knacker has worked hard all his life and pinched every penny to retire in an idyllic third world country where his money could last him forever. Glynis, Shep's wife, always found some excuse whey "now" is not the right time to go. Shep had had enough and he announces that he is leaving with or without Glynis.

But Glynis found out she has cancer and Shep puts his plans aside while his bank account starts dropping like a stone.

"so much for that" by Lionel Shriver a tough book to read because of the subject matter, however it is well written, interesting and hard to put down.

Shep, the protagonist, has been saving money all his life in order to retire to a small African island named Pemba where the cost of living is minuscule, that is until his wife got cancer and Shep started to see his life savings of more then $800,000 dwindle away to nothing.
And Shep has health insurance.

Shep's best friend, Jackson who has his own sick daughter and is also working for health insurance. Jackson's world is divided between those who take (anyone who is on the government payroll in some form) and those who give (everyone who is not on the government's payroll but pay taxes).
His political tirades were some of the interesting points in the book.

Shep's life is full with "moochers" (those who take according to Jackson), his father, a minister, never saved enough to retire, his sister is self centered and expects him to bail her out by "loaning" her money. Shep's daughter is going to college, his son is in private high-school and Shep's wife got a low paying job because, during a fight, he told her she is not contributing. The minor characters are interesting but not very realistic - however they do make the point.

This book hit me very personally on several levels.
First, my father, who passed away in December, has cancer for the last two years of his life - which was a real harsh lesson on what "health coverage" really mean. My dad was a small business owner who paid boat loads of money, out of pocket, into the health care system and got very little in return (he didn't get sick often).

Luckily he and my mom moved out of the house they lived in for almost 30 years and into a 55+ complex, which they paid cash - otherwise they would have lost their home. His medication cost $7,000 a month, his insurance paid 50%.
Can you afford a $3,500 monthly bill for one type of medication?

They basically had to show income of less than $1,000 a month in order to survive.

This taught us a painful lesson - don't get sick unless you are very rich or very poor. Even with health insurance you are likely to go bankrupt, lose your personal fortune and everything you worked to acquire your whole life.

Second, living in New Jersey, possibly the most corrupt state in the union where people who own their homes outright are being evicted because the preposterous property taxes - Jackson's diatribes hit a sore spot.

We pay the highest personal taxes in the nation where 50% of them goes to somebody's pocket (corruption tax), 25% are wasted (as per the state's comptroller) and the other 25%, the money used to run the state, is still four times higher than other states.

As you can tell, I truly enjoyed this book. It is very thought provoking and I highly rec

posted by Man_Of_La_Book_Dot_Com on March 18, 2011

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

So much for that

This book was 150 pages too long. I had to speed read. All of the social commentary was too much. The characters were well written and the plot good. I am going back to murder mysteries where the social commentary is subtle and not in your face,
Lionel carbonneau, massa...
This book was 150 pages too long. I had to speed read. All of the social commentary was too much. The characters were well written and the plot good. I am going back to murder mysteries where the social commentary is subtle and not in your face,
Lionel carbonneau, massachusetts.

posted by LioneC on June 25, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2012

    So much for that

    This book was 150 pages too long. I had to speed read. All of the social commentary was too much. The characters were well written and the plot good. I am going back to murder mysteries where the social commentary is subtle and not in your face,
    Lionel carbonneau, massachusetts.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 18, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Recommended for Book Clubs Everywhere

    "so much for that" by Lionel Shriver is a fictional book about serious matters. The book deals with the frustration and the unfairness of dealing with the US healthcare industry.

    Shep Knacker has worked hard all his life and pinched every penny to retire in an idyllic third world country where his money could last him forever. Glynis, Shep's wife, always found some excuse whey "now" is not the right time to go. Shep had had enough and he announces that he is leaving with or without Glynis.

    But Glynis found out she has cancer and Shep puts his plans aside while his bank account starts dropping like a stone.

    "so much for that" by Lionel Shriver a tough book to read because of the subject matter, however it is well written, interesting and hard to put down.

    Shep, the protagonist, has been saving money all his life in order to retire to a small African island named Pemba where the cost of living is minuscule, that is until his wife got cancer and Shep started to see his life savings of more then $800,000 dwindle away to nothing.
    And Shep has health insurance.

    Shep's best friend, Jackson who has his own sick daughter and is also working for health insurance. Jackson's world is divided between those who take (anyone who is on the government payroll in some form) and those who give (everyone who is not on the government's payroll but pay taxes).
    His political tirades were some of the interesting points in the book.

    Shep's life is full with "moochers" (those who take according to Jackson), his father, a minister, never saved enough to retire, his sister is self centered and expects him to bail her out by "loaning" her money. Shep's daughter is going to college, his son is in private high-school and Shep's wife got a low paying job because, during a fight, he told her she is not contributing. The minor characters are interesting but not very realistic - however they do make the point.

    This book hit me very personally on several levels.
    First, my father, who passed away in December, has cancer for the last two years of his life - which was a real harsh lesson on what "health coverage" really mean. My dad was a small business owner who paid boat loads of money, out of pocket, into the health care system and got very little in return (he didn't get sick often).

    Luckily he and my mom moved out of the house they lived in for almost 30 years and into a 55+ complex, which they paid cash - otherwise they would have lost their home. His medication cost $7,000 a month, his insurance paid 50%.
    Can you afford a $3,500 monthly bill for one type of medication?

    They basically had to show income of less than $1,000 a month in order to survive.

    This taught us a painful lesson - don't get sick unless you are very rich or very poor. Even with health insurance you are likely to go bankrupt, lose your personal fortune and everything you worked to acquire your whole life.

    Second, living in New Jersey, possibly the most corrupt state in the union where people who own their homes outright are being evicted because the preposterous property taxes - Jackson's diatribes hit a sore spot.

    We pay the highest personal taxes in the nation where 50% of them goes to somebody's pocket (corruption tax), 25% are wasted (as per the state's comptroller) and the other 25%, the money used to run the state, is still four times higher than other states.

    As you can tell, I truly enjoyed this book. It is very thought provoking and I highly rec

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 14, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Strange subplot and contrived ending

    This book was a tough read, not because it is a 'bad' book but because of its subject -- a family dealing with cancer. As I read the book, it had the effect of making me so thankful for my friends and family. And revealing the main character's account balance at the beginning of many chapters has a shocking and sobering effect on the reader. These things really happen! But I had a problem getting into the story because the book contains a subplot whose culmination is just too strange to be believable, and the ending felt much too contrived. I'm not sure what type of reader this book is for, but this book did not pique my interest in other works by the author. Having never been in a book club, I don't know whether it would make a good book for discussion. Although I could see it prompting a lot of discussion, there are probably better books than this. In summary, while I admire the author for tackling such an unpleasant subject, the book did not live up to my expectations based on other reviews I had read, and I would not recommend it to others.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Characters hit home, sometimes in an uncomfortable way

    This book taps into healthcare and of life care debates in a very real way, but stops from being too didactic because of the way the characters evolve. I find that I never really like the characters in Lionel Shriver's books and virtues are often exposed as flaws. The responsible, I always follow the rules character is revealed as a pushover, the stoic mother holding the family together as cold, unforgiving and out of touch. I think this is book makes a great springboard for discussion on the hot topics of the day but also makes you examine when a good quality tips the scale to become annoying. Shoudl we accept what life throws at us or fight back even thogh it makes people uncomfortable

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2014

    Prognosis is not good

    I wanted to give this book a fair shot as it was a book club selection. And I tried. Characters are unlikable; story is depressing; the prose is wordy; the tone is often preachy or polemical. I enjoy thought provoking books, but this one flatlined.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2013

    Wonder

    This is a wonderful story about a very powerful subject. This author knows how to write and it was a privlege to read her book. Don't miss this one


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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2013

    I loved, "We Need to Talk About Kevin," so was prepare

    I loved, "We Need to Talk About Kevin," so was prepared to be wowed again. Unfortunately, the book didn't deliver for me. Jackson's never-ending prattle got on my nerves after a while. One speech would have sufficed. Moreover, I didn't get Shep's motivation. How could he go from getting ready to leave his wife to self-effacing doting husband? I didn't believe it. I will give Shriver another go because I thought "We Need to Take About Kevin" was that good. But I may wait a while.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2013

    Look at my review please

    I am bored. Please talk to me. Headline under char thank you for reading

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 7, 2010

    So much for our health care system

    Sometimes I felt I was reading a magazine article about our broken health care system, disguised as a novel. I did like the story, despite the fact I nearly quit reading because the characters pretty much suck, and I had a difficult time feeling any empathy or sympathy. I probably would not recommend it to anyone. By the way, what is the reason the author lives in London? Just curious.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 11, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    This is a powerful condemnation of the American health system

    Shep Knacker has always wanted to go to "The Afterlife" retreat when he retires. His plan to is sell his home repair business and stop driving on one the world's longest parking lot, the BQE. Thus when he believes he can afford to move to the Third World haven he sells his business for a million dollars.

    However, Shep made one major miscalculation. He failed to understand the hidden meaning to the excuses his wife of over a quarter of a century Glynis has given him to delay their retreat from America. He delays his departure for her and continues working for the guy who bought his firm until a tired Shep decides enough. He informs Glynis that he moving to an island off Tanzania. However, Glynis tells him that she desperately needs medical treatment in which his insurance will cover some of the bill. His Afterlife fund shrinks and Shep wonders how he has been trapped in his present life in which medical costs are killing his dream and consequently him; though he admits his complaints compared to his friend whose dealing with botched surgery and a daughter with an incurable disease feel like he is whining.

    This is a powerful condemnation of the American health system that does not attempt to be subtle with its gut shots. At times the commentary feels forced, but as a whole, So Much for That hits home with relevancy as readers follow three subplots that are common problems. Shep watches his dream disappear with health care costs while his best friend lives in a health care nightmare. Although the verdict remains out on the Obamacare protecting more Americans, Lionel Shriver makes a strong case that the status quo denotes failure (and backroom death squad decisions), and tort limitations punishes the wrong party.

    Harriet Klausner

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 10, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Writing reminds me of author John Updike

    In the beginning I wasn't so sure I could read all 433 pages of this novel, but I became enthralled after the first 100 pages. There are many threads to the story and it certainly did remind me of some of John Updike's works. It is a long book but it reads rather quickly and it certainly is a good commentary about American life in the 21st Century.

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  • Posted March 11, 2010

    Lionel Shriver Does it Again

    So Much For That, Lionel Shriver's latest novel takes on the US health care industry, but it is so much more than that. The story focuses on two families who are best friends, and both of which have members battling deadly diseases. Yes, it takes our health care system to task for things like 40% co-pays and reimbursement of "usual and customary fees" for out of network doctors, but it is also a story of love and friendship, and about how illness impacts not just our finances, but our relationships, as well.

    CommitmentNow.com is featuring this book as its Book of the Month and has a great author interview with Lionel. http://www.commitmentnow.com/cooking-parties-travel-fun/features/commitments-book-club-book-of-the-month/feature/our-book-of-the-month-is-so-much-for-that-by-lionel-shriver

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted December 27, 2011

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