Customer Reviews for

Someone Else, Somewhere Else

Average Rating 3
( 10 )
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

I read this as part of Innovative Online Book Tours for my blog

I read this as part of Innovative Online Book Tours for my blog All Things Writing.

First of all, I love that this author, Jenelle Jack Pierre, is marketing her short story! It's just another example of how authors need to think outside the box when it comes to selling...
I read this as part of Innovative Online Book Tours for my blog All Things Writing.

First of all, I love that this author, Jenelle Jack Pierre, is marketing her short story! It's just another example of how authors need to think outside the box when it comes to selling and promoting their work. And this is a tale worth promoting!



Someone Else, Somewhere Else is told from the pov of twin girls who talk about their experience living next door to a family with a less than idyllic home life. The twin's mother recently remarried a man that everyone likes and who strives to take care of his new family. The people next door also have a blended family, but unfortunately, the stepmother tends to favor her own kids over her stepdaughter, Ariya. It's a distinction that everyone seems to notice, but no one wants to bring up. Of course, things change when Ariya takes a stand and pays the consequences for her actions.



It's hard not to give away the whole story since it is so short, but I will say that Pierre manages to present a slice of life. Set on an island that feels very small town and homey, her characters are believable and easy to relate to. I'd venture to say that we've all seen a girl like Ariya at some point in our lives. I think the tension between the stepmother and Ariya was just right, leaving the reader feeling their emotions, but not going overboard with it so that it turned into a cliché. I was a bit confused as to when they story was taking place. At times it felt like it was set in the past, but the Xbox references made it feel more current. There is also a moment where the daughter is hanging laundry on the clothes line and I couldn't help but think, "Okay, you can afford the Xbox, but not a cheap indoor washer and dryer?" Then again, I guess that shows where my priorities are when it comes to the laundry!


All in all, this was a fast paced read with great characters.

posted by MALoesch on May 26, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

left me with a bittersweet sadness

The first thing I noticed about this work was the narrative. I don’t recall ever reading a work in first person plural. This story was told from the perspective of both the twins, which doubly interesting because the twin girls (main characters) in the story were namele...
The first thing I noticed about this work was the narrative. I don’t recall ever reading a work in first person plural. This story was told from the perspective of both the twins, which doubly interesting because the twin girls (main characters) in the story were nameless. The narrative was presented in such a way it gave the two girls a collective thought. For me, the over all effect made Someone Else, Somewhere Else a worthy read if only for analysis. As for the story itself, Someone Else, Somewhere Else was thought provoking. Not only was it a reminder we don’t get to pick the families we’re born into, but that children have even less say in the hand they’re dealt. They get what they get and adjust the best they can. I finished this story wondering if I protected my children effectively from the harm always around the corner, and hoping their childhood memories will be filled with enough joy to outweigh the bad. This read left me with a bittersweet sadness, and I hoped Ariya found happiness in her choices. I say if you have 20-30 minutes of spare time, check out this read.

posted by ReenaJacobs on July 14, 2012

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  • Posted May 26, 2012

    I read this as part of Innovative Online Book Tours for my blog

    I read this as part of Innovative Online Book Tours for my blog All Things Writing.

    First of all, I love that this author, Jenelle Jack Pierre, is marketing her short story! It's just another example of how authors need to think outside the box when it comes to selling and promoting their work. And this is a tale worth promoting!



    Someone Else, Somewhere Else is told from the pov of twin girls who talk about their experience living next door to a family with a less than idyllic home life. The twin's mother recently remarried a man that everyone likes and who strives to take care of his new family. The people next door also have a blended family, but unfortunately, the stepmother tends to favor her own kids over her stepdaughter, Ariya. It's a distinction that everyone seems to notice, but no one wants to bring up. Of course, things change when Ariya takes a stand and pays the consequences for her actions.



    It's hard not to give away the whole story since it is so short, but I will say that Pierre manages to present a slice of life. Set on an island that feels very small town and homey, her characters are believable and easy to relate to. I'd venture to say that we've all seen a girl like Ariya at some point in our lives. I think the tension between the stepmother and Ariya was just right, leaving the reader feeling their emotions, but not going overboard with it so that it turned into a cliché. I was a bit confused as to when they story was taking place. At times it felt like it was set in the past, but the Xbox references made it feel more current. There is also a moment where the daughter is hanging laundry on the clothes line and I couldn't help but think, "Okay, you can afford the Xbox, but not a cheap indoor washer and dryer?" Then again, I guess that shows where my priorities are when it comes to the laundry!


    All in all, this was a fast paced read with great characters.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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