Customer Reviews for

Someone Else's Love Story

Average Rating 4
( 61 )
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5 Star

(35)

4 Star

(8)

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(7)

2 Star

(9)

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(2)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

11 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

Great book

Loved this book and it's true to life story. A very clever story with suprises through out. A truly greaf read.

I would also like to lend my voice to those who object to Plot Spoilers and kids who enjoy being stupid in book reviews. Why can't you text your trash like o...
Loved this book and it's true to life story. A very clever story with suprises through out. A truly greaf read.

I would also like to lend my voice to those who object to Plot Spoilers and kids who enjoy being stupid in book reviews. Why can't you text your trash like other kiddies do? If you have a review to post please there are others. who would just like to know if you like or dislike and why. Thanks.

posted by Para-Fan on January 8, 2014

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Most Helpful Critical Review

14 out of 22 people found this review helpful.

Tired of the cra

Seriously, why can't barnes & noble do something about all the ridiculous crap that's in the reviews section? Im so sick of it. And to the people who do it....get a life and quit wasting my time.

posted by 3541077 on January 8, 2014

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2014

    Great book

    Loved this book and it's true to life story. A very clever story with suprises through out. A truly greaf read.

    I would also like to lend my voice to those who object to Plot Spoilers and kids who enjoy being stupid in book reviews. Why can't you text your trash like other kiddies do? If you have a review to post please there are others. who would just like to know if you like or dislike and why. Thanks.

    11 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2013

    Joshilyn's Best Yet

    I am a huge fan of Joshilyn's strong, Southern characters and this book brings even more. Carefully crafted storylines + flawed but intriguing characters make this a must read.

    10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2014

    Very good quick read

    More twists and turns than you'd expect from a romance-type novel, but that made it better. I loved the prose, and the complex character relationships. Will be reading more by this author.

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2014

    Wondeful Book

    Intelligently written book; very moving.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 28, 2014

    This is the first book I have read from this author. I thought i

    This is the first book I have read from this author. I thought it was exceptional.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 31, 2014

    Love this author!

    Shandi, a 21-year-old college senior, is still at home being mothered by her mother, while she is trying to be a mother to three-year-old Nathan. After “Natty” teaches himself to read and his IQ is found to be in the genius range, Shandi’s father (or rather, her step-mother Bethany) invites Shandi and her son to come live in their Atlanta condo so that Nathan will have the opportunity to attend an academically appropriate pre-school. Shandi jumps at the chance to live ten minutes away from Georgia State instead of two hours away in her small mountain town.

    Shandi, Natty, and best-friend Walcott are on their way to Atlanta in her bright yellow VW bug when suddenly Natty declares that his throat feel “tickle-y.” As any mother of a carsick prone child would do, Shandi makes the quickest exit she can and stops the car for some side of the road throwing up, and then a trip the Circle K for some ginger ale. Unfortunately, this is where their day goes downhill, and quickly.

    The first paragraph of the book reads:

    “I fell in love with William Ashe at gunpoint, in a Circle K. It was on a Friday afternoon at the tail end of a Georgia summer so ungodly hot the air felt like it had all been boiled red. We were both staring down the barrel of an ancient, creaky .32 that could kill us just as dead as a really nice gun could.”

    The author says that William is a character she has had bumping around in her head for a decade. He is a scientist, thinking in terms of black and white, yes or no, and does not in any way believe in destiny. William believes that what happens is a direct result of choices that people make, not some mystical force that causes the universe to unfold in a certain way. William is standing in the Circle K staring at the laundry detergent when a man walks in with that ancient, creaky .32. As the gunman orders everyone to the ground, William slides eighteen inches to the side, putting himself between the gun and Natty.

    This is a book about miracles, although not the huge, visible miracles that some of the characters believe in, but the tiny miracles that bubble up unexpectedly. Joshilyn Jackson is a talented author who writes vivid prose in such a way that you can almost taste the words, rich and full. In this particular book, Jackson throws in plot twists that I did not anticipate, yet draws the strings together and makes the conclusion a satisfying one. The images she creates with her written words will stay with you long after finishing the book.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 23, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Shandi Pierce is no stranger to miracles┬┐she was still a virgin

    Shandi Pierce is no stranger to miracles—she was still a virgin when she had her son, Natty, and he in the flesh is an everyday blessing—and so when, in an extraordinary turn of the cosmic screw during her move to Atlanta, she's held at gunpoint in a Circle K, she sees no other option than to consider her fateful meeting with William Ashe just that: a miracle. This is the moment that changes everything for her; it is the moment she decides she will no longer pretend that beautiful Natty's conception was a miracle—immaculate and tidy—and unbeknownst to her yet, it is the moment she embarks on the poignant quest to finally face up to reality.

    Joshilyn Jackson's newest novel is a quirky, surprisingly tender journey that tests the boundaries of personal strengths, as well as weaves a glittering story about destiny or—as pushed by science and numbers—lack thereof.

    The story consists of an exchange between two distinct narratives: Shandi's vivid, smart, and smart-assed first-person voice intertwined with Will's blunted, methodical, and seemingly objective point-of-view. The unique timeline—primarily placed in the present, but with flashes of significant events revealed during opportune moments—allows readers  to become intimate with both characters who are similar in that they are both cynically hopeful, loved, and lonely, but diverge because they are ultimately fighting their own inner battles—battles they expose to one another, but cannot expect the other to completely understand. This is, by any measure, a love story—multiple love stories—but it is not their love story, because their stories are established before they even get the chance to meet.

    There's nothing that wasn't well done in this novel. The story is intriguing and immersed me completely; the style is at once unusual, observant, and accurate; and the characters are lively, unforgettable.

    Shandi is a new favorite female protagonist of mine; she's all of cute, hilarious, mature but still playful, and kickass, and I loved getting to know her in mind and in heart. She totes her delightful genius son Natty—who is obsessed with insect abdomens and has the grammatical capacity of a 40-year-old English professor—and her best friend Walcott-the-poet—whom she's been overly dependent upon since childhood—to Atlanta and as her closest family, these two will absolutely make you melt. Will is a character who doesn't reveal much about himself, but is complex in his own way, and I loved how he is portrayed too.

    When the two meet, it's an act of fate—of destiny—and it happens like a collision. Suddenly, Shandi is propelled to search for the truth about Natty's conception, while on the other end of the spectrum, Will learns, through Shandi's own frantic fixation, what faith is and what miracles are—things he never allowed himself to believe in previously, when his world was all science and coincidence. Shandi inadvertently shows Will that hope, that thing with feathers, will find a way to piece his broken life back together... and while the two fragmented souls use one another complete themselves, there is solace—and emptiness—in knowing they do not complete each other.

    I can't say much more without giving the important plot points away, but I will end with this: Someone Else's Love Story is brilliant. It is complicated, inspiring, and transfixing, and I don't know how Jackson pulled it off, but it so perfectly embodies the pain of sacrifice—the giving up and giving in for love—as well as the importance of family, faith, and the true definition of being holy. The unorthodox style and the god-honest narration will have you chortling with glee, while the ironic, nearly sacrilegious parallels will stun you emotionally. You have got to read this book.

    Pros: Amazing storytelling // Fresh, intelligent, witty voice // Elaborate, enjoyable style // LOVED Shandi // LOVED Will // Loved all the other characters // Huge plot twist that throws everything off cue // A nontraditional love story

    Cons: The novel as a whole neglects the more pragmatic aspects of Shandi's life, such as school and work // Unresolved issues by the end

    Verdict: With incredible attention to detail and penetrating insight of the human syndrome, Someone Else's Love Story is an unconventional love story with a memorable, dazzlingly human cast of characters, and enough personality to make you want to become the author's best best friend. Joshilyn Jackson presents the best and the brightest of deep, soulful, sassy Southern literary fiction with her newest novel; Shandi's rightful investigation and Will's slow resurrection cross paths in an exquisite, charming story about chance, love, faith, and most of important of them all, hope.

    Rating: 9 out of 10 hearts (5 stars): Loved it! This book has a spot on my favorites shelf.

    Source: Complimentary copy provided by publisher via tour publicist in exchange for an honest and unbiased review (thank you, Harper Collins and TLC!).

    1 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2014

    Jonathan

    Hi

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2014

    Gyvbh

    Gvgyctffcuguh

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2014

    Patty

    I get depressed a lot because I get bullied and my friend and I fight a lot. I have thought of suicide numerous times i need help

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2014

    Alice

    You must find methods that wor for you. Telling a person one thing is different than that person learning and experiencing it for themself. Thats what i mean by learning from your own mistakes

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 8, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Shandi Pierce has her best friend, Walcott, tell her family and

    Shandi Pierce has her best friend, Walcott, tell her family and friends that she conceived her son, Natty, in a “virgin” birth.  The credibility of this claim stretches the reader’s curiosity but her story doesn’t change for a long, long time, four years to be exact.  Natty, it turns out, is a gifted child and so Shandi is taking him to live in Atlanta where he can attend a school for special children.  This gift comes from her father, long divorced from her mother, with the disapproval of Bethany, her father’s second wife, a snob always willing to fling barbs at Shandi.  Her Mom and Dad are always vying for Shandi’s preference but that’s not her way.  Now it’s time to begin a journey for her beloved Natty, who is her “everything!”
    An incidental stop at the Circle K gas station turns into a horror and later a mercy.  For after Shandi is done ogling a sexy looking “Thor” figure, they all enter the store for some snacks and then a drugged-up guy enters with a gun, determined to hold up the cashier for whatever cash he can get.  The story of the captive victims in the store is riveting reading that amps up the adrenaline for the reader as well as the fearful prisoners.  Where it goes is so totally unexpected but evolves into Shandi facing her past and wanting to know the unknown about her son’s real father.
    William is the hero of the day and yet he’s an enigma.  He’s a brilliant scientist and probably autistic (something like Asperger’s Syndrome, but never specifically identified).  He’s also suffering from a devastating, brutal loss that haunts his days and nights and has done so for the past year.  Later on his best friend, Paula, and Shandi clash like wildfire as each vies not only for William’s mind but also his heart, something that whirls through William’s brain but which he can’t resolve.
    William, however, is the one who really “gets” what Shandi needs and the discovery of Natty’s genetic makeup leads not only to Natty’s father but a story within a story that is shockingly credible and intertwines with characters one would never imagine were involved.  The plot becomes complex but does reach clarity by the lovely but unexpected ending.
    Someone Else’s Story is a thriller and a love story, but the latter includes many different types of love that force several characters to grow up fast and face the truth about the past, present and future!  
    Solidly written and fascinating read, Joshilyn Jackson!

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2014

    Volume4

    Here

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2014

    Keith

    He walks in.

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2014

    Kaya

    Are you a sex loving ACTIVE guy?

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2014

    Boys

    I am 11 yr old girl from Wisconsin and let me know if u want to go out with me label it Holly

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 9, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Brilliantly Written - A complex and engrossing must read!

    The most complex, brilliantly written and inspiring love story!

    I recently discovered this author through some other fellow authors - and wow, so glad I did---as Joshilyn is highly talented and creative and love the way she thinks outside the box and not afraid to tackle any issue.

    Would highly recommend the audio version, as Jackson is the narrator; however, I found when listening via ipod, it is not a mindless book- you need to pay attention as you do not want to miss any part of this story. (I found myself stopping as if someone interrupted me I would have to rewind to the beginning of the track; It is this GOOD- you do not want to miss a word or phrase!

    I would not change a thing about this book - it was carefully developed, full of suspense, southern humor, rich characters, and quite engaging, covering so many diverse topics and feelings.

    Hats off to the author for pulling you in from beginning to the end and giving you enough to keep you hanging throughout. Superb!

    A thought provoking read; one which would be ideal for book clubs or discussion groups, as I would encourage readers to review all the reviews on Goodreads and other sites (not the spoilers). A beautiful and inspiring love story which makes you think about this book long after you complete. A Winner!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 31, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    The strength of Joshilyn Jackson's latest novel, Someone Else's

    The strength of Joshilyn Jackson's latest novel, Someone Else's Love Story lies in the terrific characters she creates. Right away, from the first sentence, "I fell in love with William Ashe at gunpoint, in a Circle K.", you know you are in for a fantastic ride.
    Shandi is a single mom of a extraordinarily intelligent four-year-old boy Natty. They are headed to Atlanta with her best friend Walcott, when they stop at the Circle K to get Natty a ginger ale to settle his upset stomach.
    Shandi notices the ruggedly handsome William Ashe in the store and when the store is held up by a young gunman and William moves to protect Natty, she is completely smitten. A hostage situation occurs and William does his best to try and keep everyone safe.
    When the standoff ends in an injury to William, Shandi makes it her mission to care for him. She also discovers that he is a research geneticist, and she hopes to get William to help her discover the father of her son, whom she does not know.
    As Shandi and William and Natty grow closer, William's best friend Paula becomes angry. She is openly hostile to Shandi, and tells her that William will never love her. He loves his wife Bridget, whom he lost in a car accident, along with their two-year-old daughter, two years ago.
    Walcott also discourages Shandi from beginning a relationship with William. Shandi doesn't understand why Walcott, her best friend since childhood, has become so distant since the robbery. He has always been there for her, through her high school pregnancy, and he loves Natty, but recently he has been AWOL.
    William is very intelligent, but socially he is very awkward. As his story unfolds, we find that he is probably somewhere on the autism spectrum, perhaps closer to Aspergers Syndrome. He struggled socially as a child, and only connected with people when he was a high school football star. Paula and Bridget were the only two people who understood him.
    Jackson has said that this is William's story, and in a story filled with so many interesting characters, he stands out. His wooing of Bridget, with help from Paula, is so moving and sweet. The someone else in this love story is Bridget and William.
    I loved Shandi's fearlessness, her willingness to put herself out there and work to find love. She is a wonderful mom too, and her love for Natty is stronger than iron. She would do anything for her son, who is so different from other kids his age. Part of her attraction to William is that she thinks Natty might be like him- a brilliant mind, but maybe socially different.
    There is big twist at the end, one that totally took me by surprise. It changes everything in the story and kudos to Jackson for not tipping her hand.
    I loved this book, and felt like these characters were real people, people I would love to know. I adored the friendships, the romance, the family, the whole package. Jackson took me on a ride that I won't soon forget.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 31, 2014

    Just loved this

    I shouldn't have loved this book, because it has, on the surface, some trigger plotlines for me--violence/danger, especially involving women and children. But I loved loved LOVED this book. There were one or two places where I thought, "hmmmm, not QUITE buying it," but then it would move an inch to the left and I'd buy in again. And in several places the hairs on my arms stood up, which doesn't happen when I'm scared, but when something is said JUST PERFECTLY, or a plotline hits just the right note.

    I love Joshilyn's books. And I am SO SO SO hoping that there will indeed be a sequel, because there wasn't enough closure for me. I can't decide who in this book I would hug first if they were all in a room and I walked in and got to meet them. Well, after Natty, that is.

    Must go read My Own Miraculous now!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 28, 2014

    Kyle

    Yeah sure

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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