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The Sound and the Fury

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

13 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

The Sound and the Fury

William Fauklner's forth novel and considered by many to be his masterpeice, The Sound and the fury is an absolute great read. A Challenging yet rewarding book, the novel contains 4 chapters, each narrarated by 4 different speakers, the three Compson brothers and the f...
William Fauklner's forth novel and considered by many to be his masterpeice, The Sound and the fury is an absolute great read. A Challenging yet rewarding book, the novel contains 4 chapters, each narrarated by 4 different speakers, the three Compson brothers and the fourth is told in third-person. The First chapter is told by the mentally retarded benjy. The Second is told by the sad elder-child Quentin, and the third told by the mean and selfish Jason. many consider benjy's chapter to be the most difficult, however, I found the chapter a lot easier than Quentin to be much more difficult. The last 2 chapters were very simple. One of the best books I have ever read I would recommend reading SparkNotes for a litle aid if you are new to these harder and more rewarding works of fiction.

posted by McCarthy92 on August 12, 2009

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Most Helpful Critical Review

7 out of 26 people found this review helpful.

Really?

U CANNOT JUSTIFY THIS PRICE FOR THIS BOOK. Are u trying to alienate your loyal customers? Jacking up the prices and blaming someone else is becoming a very concerning trend. We want books and quality apps at FAIR prices. I love my NC and buy alot of books and apps, but...
U CANNOT JUSTIFY THIS PRICE FOR THIS BOOK. Are u trying to alienate your loyal customers? Jacking up the prices and blaming someone else is becoming a very concerning trend. We want books and quality apps at FAIR prices. I love my NC and buy alot of books and apps, but it is a turnoff to see blatant overpricing. Are u figuring that we are trapped and have no choice? We depend on u to do the right thing. I will Read Forever if u do.

posted by Artazen on May 25, 2011

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  • Posted August 12, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    The Sound and the Fury

    William Fauklner's forth novel and considered by many to be his masterpeice, The Sound and the fury is an absolute great read. A Challenging yet rewarding book, the novel contains 4 chapters, each narrarated by 4 different speakers, the three Compson brothers and the fourth is told in third-person. The First chapter is told by the mentally retarded benjy. The Second is told by the sad elder-child Quentin, and the third told by the mean and selfish Jason. many consider benjy's chapter to be the most difficult, however, I found the chapter a lot easier than Quentin to be much more difficult. The last 2 chapters were very simple. One of the best books I have ever read I would recommend reading SparkNotes for a litle aid if you are new to these harder and more rewarding works of fiction.

    13 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2003

    Amazingly captures the very evil of human traits

    William Faulkner brilliantly tells the inherent evil in the ignorance that humans establish in life through the Compson family. The setting takes place in the South where one family will not change from their slave driven ways causing the downfall and torture of every member. You will see the consequences of evil ways through: Caddy, the beautiful yet tragically promiscuous daughter. Benjy, the mentally retarded manchild who can't grow up Quentin, the suicidal son who is tortured with the realization of the evil that exists within his family Jason, the posessor of this inherent evil that has been passed down through his family This book is one that captures the truth of what ignorance can truly cause. It is dark novel that gives but a glimpse to what the humans can possess. This novel is one that I only hope everyone takes the time to read.

    10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 13, 2006

    A work of art!

    I have read this book, and Faulkner's ability to use the thoughts of others and to incorporate them into the story. Some say that this story is babble, but they can't understand that this story was written in the early 1900s. Faulkner had his own way of starting and ending a story. It's brilliant dialogue and cultural visions, give us a glimpse into the life of a family in the South during the times of racism and slavery.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2002

    A Masterpiece

    One of the highest heights reached in American literature. Let the English lit professors argue about modernism's relevance. This is a profound story told in a complex and powerful way. Faulkner's powers are at their peak in his masterpiece. This is not an easy read at first, especially for those unaccustomed to the non-linear storytelling style of modernism. The story's multiple points of perspective may also be initially confusing. The end result though makes the journey worth the undertaking.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 20, 2013

    I can only speculate as to the overall quality of the review to

    I can only speculate as to the overall quality of the review to follow, as I have only read this book once. This is one that, after I set it down and thought about for a week, replaying key scenes and revisiting key images in my mind, I desired greatly to read again. But I didn't; I went ahead and read two other Faulkner novels, those being 'Light in August' and 'As I Lay Dying'. I found that I could not get enough of the man's work, because as a writer and something of a closet aesthete, I fell in love with his brilliant style, with its fluctuating regard for proper punctuation and its haunting stream-of-consciousness passages. I became intrigued by his characters and by the way they functioned and thought and failed. No book has altered the way that I think more than this one. This is one that remains always in the back of my mind even now, three months after completing it. I have never physically been to the South, but after reading this and two of his other novels, I feel that I know it much better than if I had simply gone and stayed in Mississippi for a week, having been taken there mentally, having felt the overwhelming hubris, impotency and humanity of the Compson family. One gets the feeling, reading through 'The Sound and the Fury', that Faulkner has tossed proper method out the window, leaving us only with the madness. I can only say that it is a madness well worth experiencing multiple times (in fact, it demands it), and that I shall be returning to it shortly.  

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2006

    Fantastic Deep Reading

    I read this book for an english project and ended up loving it. The beginning section seems at first an insurmountable obstacle, but the further you get into it the better it gets. This novel is a profound exploration of human nature that captivates the diligent reader.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2005

    Amazing

    This might be the best book I have ever read. For anyone bold enough to pick it up, I highly recommend it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2013

    This changed my opinion of 'classics'.

    This changed my opinion of 'classics'.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2013

    Arguably the most difficult book I have ever read, but also one

    Arguably the most difficult book I have ever read, but also one of my all time favorites.  Faulkner himself acknowledged how difficult the book was to read when he originally requested having different text colors for the characters.

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  • Posted September 10, 2012

    Great Novel

    This novel was the first, and still, only thing by Faulkner I have read. This book was also my first introduction to fiction with a non-linear structure. I was so blown away by how different everything was that I read it all in a single day. This book is confusing, but it is worth the effort. The critical essays in this edition, as well a, some of Faulkner's own writing about the novel really helped me get a grasp on what was happening in the story. From beginning to end I was trying to piece together who's narrative each part was. I was actually excited by this as well. This book is the best example I have ever read of the stream-of-consciousness style.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2012

    The epitome of editorial excellence

    If nothing else, one must appreciate the artfullness and craft that Faulkner exhibits in this masterpiece. Those whom rate it poorly must not be avid readers or lack the patience and open mind that reading classics sometimes requires. I admit that it was confusing to keep up with it at first, given the fact that the first chapter is from the perspective and thought process of Benjy, a retarded sibling of the Compson family, but as the book progesses, so does the solidity and apparent interconnectedness of the novel.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2012

    Madisson

    Awesome

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  • Posted October 20, 2011

    Well worth the read...

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    My absolute favorite book.

    I absolutely love this novel. It is, without a doubt, one of the most amazing accomplishments in American literature. Without question, this novel is a challenge, but the reward for reading it is more than worth the hard work that goes in to finishing it. I've read this book several times and each time find new and different meanings and appreciate the nuances of the language even more. Faulkner's writing is nothing if not daring and this is one of his most daring and satisfying books.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2006

    An Accomplishment

    Just read the book and you will understand what an extraordinary experience this book is, and just understanding atleast some of the concepts is an accomplishment. The most interesting read there is.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2005

    A Great Book - Don't Be Intimidated

    My strategy was to read the book, then read Sparknotes online about the book, then reread the book. Don't read Sparknotes first, because it's too much of a spoiler. This is only the second Faulkner book that I have read, but his books are so rich and complex, that the second reading is just as entertaining as the first, if not more so. I found the first reading to be sometimes confusing, but also to be compelling. I couldn't stop thinking about what I had read, and certain passages just 'blew me away'. Of the four sections, the last two are the easiest to comprehend. Don't give up before you get there. Nobody assigned me to read this book. I read it because I wanted to, and consider it to be time well spent.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2005

    amazing

    As long as you can get through the first part of this novel, which jumps from scene to scene midsentence, you will be in for arguably one of the greatest novels of the 20th century. For the reviewer that said Faulkner's grammar and syntax is horrible, keep in mind that the first-person narrator of the first part is a severely retarded 33 year old man (no joke).

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 23, 2004

    Amazing. Absolutely amazing.

    I strongly recommend this book. If you don't understand it the first time, go back and reread it. Once you see Faulkner's point, there is no mistaking how amazing his writing is. Be warned, however, that reading this novel is a big task. When I first read it, I went into each of the sections expecting a story, neatly wrapped and tied up, with no loose strings. I found exactly the opposite. The famous quote from Macbeth from which Faulkner got his title really does offer a great illustration of the book (especially the first section): 'It is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.' The plot of The Sound and the Fury is practically nonexistent and what does exist is not important. The plot only exists as a technicality, each tidbit adding to the big story. There is no happy ending, there is no tying up of loose ends. The absolute beauty of this novel is that it is tragic, that it leaves you always wanting more completion and more finality. But if Faulkner had tied up loose ends, if he had left out the unpleasant details of insanity, incest, rebellion, and suicide, the novel would have lost all of its merit.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2004

    Beautiful and Heart-Warming Story

    The Sound and The Fury is one of the most magnificent novels of all time. The writing is impecable and the story is emotionally moving. This is a must read for all book lovers. Once you finish reading this novel, you will truly understand what novels are supposed to be like.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2003

    Signifying life's pain and beauty

    Faulkner tells the Compson family story in four styles, through four minds, through four lives each of which sees something of what the others see, and more. He does it with poetic brilliance and that rhythmic hypnotic Faulknerian narrative style which moves you inside . When I first read this work close to forty years ago I could not understand the cruelty of Jason Compson how anybody could be so selfish to their own family. I could understand and not understand the metaphysical broodings over time of Quentin Compson and something too came through of the strange unpredictability of life as given in the adventures of Caddy Compson. The great epilogue of the book is in a way not only its summary but its ennobling. Faulkner is for most the giant of twentieth -century American literature ,and they are probably right. He teaches among other things that there is a poetry which runs through life and that the mere telling of it can augment life's meaning. These are not just words. Faulkner is filled with words words it is often hard to understand.But his greatness is that feeling that it does not signify nothing but rather in all its pain and beauty signifies something great and enduring which the reader too in reading, and hopefully in life may participate in.

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