Customer Reviews for

Southampton Row (Thomas and Charlotte Pitt Series #22)

Average Rating 4
( 12 )
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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2004

    The richness of Perry eh?

    Who says history can't be fun? Perry is brilliant in exposing the pros and cons of the 1890 political views and their ramifications. The analogies to today's controversies are astounding. Britain's vast empire serves to provide huge markets for its working class while demanding an armed forces to preserve it. Working conditions are appalling but as awful as they are, perhaps they are better than no work at all. What should be the role of women? How does the Church figure into the daily lives of its members and how do the clergy deal with Darwinism and their own personal beliefs? Mixed into the fabric of the history is a fabulous whodunit with all kinds of typical twists and turns of which Perry is notoriously famous. Her themes of family loyalty versus betrayal in order to preserve moral and ethical rightness, flourish again. Just when you think you've read her best book (White Chapel Conspiracy) she outdoes herself. I believe this was her best Pitt book so far. Although I recommend starting with book 1 and not stopping until you get to 23!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2007

    History with reality

    Love this series and the Pitts series. Hven't tried WWI. Recomend to anyone who loves Lord Peter Wimsey and Albert Campion.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2002

    Brilliant!

    Anne Perry allows her readers to feel as though they were there with the characters themselves. The most Brilliant of her talents is that she 'teaches' her audience real history and makes a pure enjoyment from indulging in it.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2002

    'Pitt's Pit'

    'Southampton Row', English author Anne Perry's latest novel in the Inspector Pitt series places the intrepid Inspector in a setting that leaves the reader intrigued and troubled. It is Pitt's success in 'The Whitechapel Conspiracy' that now threatens him and his family. Charles Voisey, the Inspector's Whitechapel nemesis reappears to haunt Pitt again. Thanks to the machinations of the Inner Circle, Pitt loses his position at the Bow Street Station and is sent to work at the Special Branch Office, a division within the Police Force set up to investigate terrorist activities. The terrorist in Pitt's life turns out to be Voisey who, as part of his continuing effort to republicanize English politics, campaigns for Parliament. Pitt is assigned to shadow Voisey and determine his weaknesses. The campaign and Voisey's connection to the murder of a spiritual medium in Southampton Row threaten Pitt professionally and personally. The new setting involves more than just the detection of a murderer, it involves the mind games played in the web of deception woven by the Inner Circle and all those forced to deal with it. In 'Southampton Row', Inspector Pitt is compelled to think and act like those he despises most, the members of the super-secret Inner Circle. In the process, Pitt develops more than his usual sincere search for truth and justice, he demonstrates a newfound ability to think like Voisey. This leaves the reader wondering if the good Inspector is now walking the same path as Voisey and descending into a pit of deception. Has he, through his work, become contaminated with the characteristics of those he despises most? What price truth? Honor? The safety of loved ones? Will Thomas compromise his principals to protect Charlotte and their children? The novel forces the reader to grapple with these same questions of conscience. 'Southampton Row' is Perry's most compelling novel to date. It is a must-read for fans of Thomas and Charlotte Pitt. Best of all, this reader sees several potential story lines for future books in this series.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Great Victorian mystery

    In late nineteenth England, it is not the monarchy or parliament who rules the country but a clandestine organization known to only a few as the Inner Circle. Thomas Pitt, a Metropolitan Street policeman, once tangled with a member of that group and for his effort was fired from his position as the superintendent of the Bow Street Station. When he was able to neutralize his enemy Queen Victoria reinstated him. <P>Unfortunately, his enemy was able to hold on to his power and thus pulled strings to force the transfer of Pitt from Bow Street to Special Branch, an organization involved in guarding England¿s from her enemies. Pitt is assigned the task of neutralizing his old enemy who is running for a seat in the House of Commons. The former superintendent knows that if he wants to keep his wife and children safe, he must succeed in his assignment and do it before his enemy has a more powerful base than he already has. <P> Anne Perry, the leading writer of Victorian mysteries, has published her best work to date in SOUTHAMPTON ROW. It is as much a political thriller as it is a Victorian historical mystery. The details of the era are so detailed and colorful, that it feels as if the author actually lived in that period. The mystery is complex and creative but the most fascinating part of the book is the political picture Perry paints for her audience that turn a potent tale into a masterpiece. <P>Harriet Klausner

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    Posted July 4, 2011

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    Posted February 11, 2012

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    Posted April 27, 2011

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    Posted July 3, 2011

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    Posted November 10, 2012

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