Customer Reviews for

Spirit Fighter

Average Rating 4.5
( 28 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(19)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

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Most Helpful Favorable Review

6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

OMG

It is sooooo gooood. I got it at my local barnes and nobles. I havent finished it yet, but it is so good. =D Take a chance and get it.

posted by 9049497 on April 5, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

5 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

Jonah Stone is a somewhat-below-average kid, struggling to keep

Jonah Stone is a somewhat-below-average kid, struggling to keep his grades up and avoid getting picked on at school. Until one day, he suddenly seems to be able to do things most athletes can't even do.
That's when Jonah's parents decide it's time to tell him the truth:...
Jonah Stone is a somewhat-below-average kid, struggling to keep his grades up and avoid getting picked on at school. Until one day, he suddenly seems to be able to do things most athletes can't even do.
That's when Jonah's parents decide it's time to tell him the truth: his mother is a nephilim, the daughter of a human and a fallen angel, making Jonah one quarter angel. Suddenly Jonah is a different person - from standing up to the bullies at school to embarking on a mission to rescue his mother after she is abducted by fallen angels.
I was very disturbed by the content of this book, mainly because it is intended for young children - the main character Jonah is thirteen. This isn't something I would want my children reading, for several reasons.
Reason #1 - In Spirit Fighter, Jonah is something of a loser until his 'angel powers' kick in. Then suddenly he's the strongest, fastest kid around. If this is the kind of fiction we're giving our kids to read, how long will it be until a kid who has just flunked a math test or failed to make the football team starts thinking 'Man, if only I was part angel'?
Yes, the nephilim are real beings whose existence is recorded in the Bible. Yes, fallen angels really did have offspring by human women. But on no level is this normal or okay, and we should not be 'normalizing' it by writing modern children's fiction about it. Why would we want our children even thinking about things like that? The Bible makes it clear that the days of the nephilim were dark days, when man's thoughts were only evil continually.
Reason #2 - I'm not convinced that Law's portrayal of parenthood in this story is biblical. I'm a writer, so I do understand that the parents frequently have to be out of the way in order for children to be able to have their big adventures; that being said, in Spirit Fighter, Jonah's mom is kidnapped and the task is apparently something that a fully human person can't do, so Jonah's dad is forced to sit at home against his wishes, doing nothing while Jonah and his sister are sent to rescue their mom with their angel powers.
Reason #3 - I don't like the attitude the author takes towards spiritual warfare. Yes, I absolutely believe in a spiritual realm and spiritual battles being waged around us. I believe that humans are occasionally called to play active roles in these spiritual battles, and sometimes humans are even given glimpses into the spiritual realm. And I believe that God gives us whatever we need to do what He wants us to do. But Jerel Law's portrayal of this - Jonah's sister throwing up a 'force field' around them when they're in danger, an enemy with an opposing force field that saps her strength, a bow and arrows that just materialize when needed - is way too flippant, more like a video game than serious spiritual battle.
Kids don't need to be reading books that are going to make them think spiritual warfare is no big deal ("I'll just say a little prayer, throw up a force field, take down a demonic cougar with a shovel, and it'll all be good, right?"). I understand that this is fiction, but it is fiction written about real spiritual matters - matters that are not something to be toyed with or taken lightly. Yes, even faith as small as a mustard seed can do wondrous things - but the spiritual war going on around us is not something we should be taking as lightly as it is taken in this book.
I received this book free of charge from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.

posted by MaryRuthP on April 17, 2012

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  • Posted April 17, 2012

    Jonah Stone is a somewhat-below-average kid, struggling to keep

    Jonah Stone is a somewhat-below-average kid, struggling to keep his grades up and avoid getting picked on at school. Until one day, he suddenly seems to be able to do things most athletes can't even do.
    That's when Jonah's parents decide it's time to tell him the truth: his mother is a nephilim, the daughter of a human and a fallen angel, making Jonah one quarter angel. Suddenly Jonah is a different person - from standing up to the bullies at school to embarking on a mission to rescue his mother after she is abducted by fallen angels.
    I was very disturbed by the content of this book, mainly because it is intended for young children - the main character Jonah is thirteen. This isn't something I would want my children reading, for several reasons.
    Reason #1 - In Spirit Fighter, Jonah is something of a loser until his 'angel powers' kick in. Then suddenly he's the strongest, fastest kid around. If this is the kind of fiction we're giving our kids to read, how long will it be until a kid who has just flunked a math test or failed to make the football team starts thinking 'Man, if only I was part angel'?
    Yes, the nephilim are real beings whose existence is recorded in the Bible. Yes, fallen angels really did have offspring by human women. But on no level is this normal or okay, and we should not be 'normalizing' it by writing modern children's fiction about it. Why would we want our children even thinking about things like that? The Bible makes it clear that the days of the nephilim were dark days, when man's thoughts were only evil continually.
    Reason #2 - I'm not convinced that Law's portrayal of parenthood in this story is biblical. I'm a writer, so I do understand that the parents frequently have to be out of the way in order for children to be able to have their big adventures; that being said, in Spirit Fighter, Jonah's mom is kidnapped and the task is apparently something that a fully human person can't do, so Jonah's dad is forced to sit at home against his wishes, doing nothing while Jonah and his sister are sent to rescue their mom with their angel powers.
    Reason #3 - I don't like the attitude the author takes towards spiritual warfare. Yes, I absolutely believe in a spiritual realm and spiritual battles being waged around us. I believe that humans are occasionally called to play active roles in these spiritual battles, and sometimes humans are even given glimpses into the spiritual realm. And I believe that God gives us whatever we need to do what He wants us to do. But Jerel Law's portrayal of this - Jonah's sister throwing up a 'force field' around them when they're in danger, an enemy with an opposing force field that saps her strength, a bow and arrows that just materialize when needed - is way too flippant, more like a video game than serious spiritual battle.
    Kids don't need to be reading books that are going to make them think spiritual warfare is no big deal ("I'll just say a little prayer, throw up a force field, take down a demonic cougar with a shovel, and it'll all be good, right?"). I understand that this is fiction, but it is fiction written about real spiritual matters - matters that are not something to be toyed with or taken lightly. Yes, even faith as small as a mustard seed can do wondrous things - but the spiritual war going on around us is not something we should be taking as lightly as it is taken in this book.
    I received this book free of charge from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.

    5 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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