Customer Reviews for

Star Trek The Lost Era #4 - 2336: Well of Souls

Average Rating 2.5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2006

    Worth reading?

    This book held such potential, but unfortunately does not deliver. The author butchers the (formerly) interesting characters like Garrett and Castillo by forcing new personalities on them. Other detracting factors include the Enterprise-C firing photon torpedoes which detonate a star and destroy an entire system. (Dumb!) Also, the ship is not a character in-of-itself, like all the other ships in the Star Trek Universe. Apparently the Enterprise doesn't even move or get involved until the book is almost over. Several canon discrepencies permeate the tale as well like warp factors, uniform descriptions, and species not yet in the Federation. I really wanted this book to deliver a tale of the Enterprise-C crew, but the author failed miserably. I would not read this book unless you absolutely must read every ST book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2004

    Horrible

    This book has no place in the Star Trek universe.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2003

    Depth, theme, action, and characters I cared about.

    In the far past of alien world, the line of the Night Kings ends with a prince too cowardly to take Uramtali - the goddess of the Well of Souls, the immortal dithparu - into his body. On present-day (2336) Farius Prime, a place not visited by decent or even prudent Federation citizens, Commander Samir al-Halad battles his ugly past in hope of saving the few people from that past who matter to him - and of keeping the person he loves most in his new life alive, too. Aboard the starship Enterprise, Captain Rachel Garrett grieves for a friend and first officer whose life she couldn't save; damns herself for letting that XO's replacement, Halad, go on 'R & R' at a time when she desperately needs backup; and fences by subspace communications with a Betazoid xeno-archaeologist who is her still-beloved ex-husband. She's missed their son's twelfth birthday, and can't even manage a conversation with young Jason now without having her ship's needs interrupt it. I spent the first half of 'Well of Souls' wondering how the author would bring together these and at least one other story line. Bick's characters captured me immediately as each appeared, and her graphically written action scenes proved wrenching because I cared about the people experiencing them. But what did Samir al-Halad's secrets, Rachel Garrett's ex-husband (on his way to a dig in Cardassian space that Ven Kaldarren knows isn't a much better place for young Jason than a starship, but what else can a father with full physical custody do except take the boy along?), Lieutenant Commander Darya Bat-Levi's efforts to fit in on her new assignment aboard Enterprise, and the Night Kings from long ago all have to do with each other? It comes together beautifully in the book's second half. What lifts this one above many other Trek novels for me is the way Bick (a psychiatrist who writes Starfleet counselors with resulting insight, and to her credit shows her 'other profession' warts and all) infuses the whole work with depth and theme. Her characters, Garrett most emphatically included, aren't perfect. Instead they are living, breathing, growing people. I have one complaint, only. I wish this were the first in a series of Rachel Garrett novels to be authored by Ilsa J. Bick. If that were true, I'd be standing in line for every one!

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