Customer Reviews for

Star Wars The Clone Wars: Yoda: Dark Rendezvous

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 26 review with 5 star rating   See All Ratings
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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2006

    Yoda and Dooku

    This book is fantastic it shows a lot depper connection between Yoda and Dooku. It shows how the Clone Wars affected the Jedi too. I pretty much read the book non-stop. I definitly reccommend this book!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2014

    To below

    Eeven c 3 po coulkill aragorn

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2013

    Fjfjrfjrjffjf

    So awesome and so #2

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2013

    The best clone wars story.

    I mean it its beyond this world.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2012

    I love star wars

    Lightsaber!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2012

    Great Star Wars read

    I was hooked when i read Darth Maul SH. This book gave me an ifinity for the ST EU. Yes, there is alot on Dookus oast which is an awesome read. But it has alot of action involving my favoraite Sith Acolyte, Asajj Ventress. This is one of my favorites out of the 38 SW novels I have read

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2012

    It is good

    It is fun

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2008

    A reviewer

    Star Wars: Yoda Dark Rendevous is an excellent novel in its insight toward the fall of Count Dooku and his relationship to Jedi Master Yoda. In addition, it may have come as a surprise to those who have seen AOTC 'Attack of the Clones' that Yoda has a sense of humor 'Lost a planet, Master Obi-Wan has...' Expect to see more of that humor in this book. Also, Yoda's profound connection to his padawans and fellow masters is reflected in his gallant actions concerning the meeting with Count Dooku and his wise decisions in regards to a young girl with which the Force is not very strong. The conclusion is shocking in its implications, of Anakin's tragic march on the Jedi Temple and Order 66.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2007

    strong with the force dooku and ventress are i sense the darkside with them

    this book was the cream of the cream one of the best star wars novels ever written and yes it is just as good as star wars shatterpoint by mattew stover and just as good as dark lord the rise of lord vader by james luceno and yes all Yoda fans will enjoy this book

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2005

    Yoda and Dooku... another link to the light and dark side saga of STAR WARS

    YODA, DARK RENDEZVOUS is a valuable read providing a link in the STAR WARS saga of the separation of Dooku and Yoda. Sean Stewart's story timeframe is thirty-plus months after Geonosis, and the continuation of the Clone Wars. This is one story more dedicated (than others) to one of my favorite characters Yoda¿ 'Mmm'! Yoda's wisdom is expressed by the author: 'But other things, inside you there are. The Force is inside you. A true Jedi lives in the Force. Touches the Force. It surrounds him: and it reaches up from inside him to touch that which surrounds. ¿ Not a pile of permacrete, home is. Not a palace or a hut, ship or shack. Wherever a Jedi is, there must the Force be, too. Wherever we are, is home.' Read and follow Sean Stewart's journey of Grand Master Yoda and Count Dooku of Serenno. The Count is a most-gifted Padawan and prime Jedi Knight in training with Master Yoda. The time has come for Dooku to go out on his own. Yoda tells him, 'A candle will I light, for you to find your way home.' They are joined as Master and Padawan, yet they end on separate paths, in different parts of the galaxy - respectively, the Jedi Temple and Chateau Malreaux on Vjun. Delight in the tournaments of young apprentices and come to know the places in the Jedi Temple -- the Combat Training Center, the Star Room, the Council Chamber, and the Room of a Thousand Fountains. Join Padawan Whie in finding out his connection to the Chateau Malreaux in which Dooku resides on Vjun (where the presence of the Force is powerfully strong). Enjoy the antics and character of Padawan Tallisibeth Enwandung-Esterhazy, her name shortened to 'Scout'. Scout is not strong in the Force, but she has wit, perseverance, determination, and dedication. Meet the 'Gran' beings, a deeply social, community-oriented folk. They have six fingers, are three-eyed with shaggy brows, goat-headed, and their faces are most suited to express worry -- her name is Maks Leem, a Master Knight in the Jedi Temple, and a favorite of the younger acolytes. The evil Asajj Ventress -- the scourge of the Jedi, her mission: to kill Jedi, and she keeps a tally, while begging for Dooku to train her in the 'dark side', but no, he says. Meet Fidelis ('the gentleman's personal gentlething'), and Solis, who are suspicious droids, as well as bad and good heroes. It is invigorating for avid readers to be introduced to a 'new' writer, i.e., debut or one not read before. This is my first exposure to author Sean Stewart, and it is a pleasant one, prompting me to read more of his writings. Stewart is proficient in language, both technical and descriptive ('xeno-ethnologists', and 'sociolinguistical slovenliness') and maintains excellent dialog technique. The last few chapters are written with a masterly exchange between Yoda and Dooku, philosophically, with tender memories, yet the presence of the light and dark sides, and a physical battle. There are times that it appears to the reader's mind that the author veers off the path of the intended story line, i.e., Yoda and Dooku. But, surprisingly, it is enticement added to the suspense of the final meeting in YODA DARK RENDEZVOUS.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2005

    Great story with great characters

    I read this book in one day! I couldn't put it down. It is a great addition to the Star Wars Universe. At first, I wasn't expecting much out of this book because the only main characters from the movies featured were Count Dooku and Yoda. Anakin and Obi-Wan don't play a very important role. After the first chapter, however, I couldn't stop reading this. Sean Stewart did an amazing job of featuring lesser known characters and creating all new original ones for this story. Scout is a sassy, strong girl that kicks butt and Whie is a young Jedi apprentice that is very strong with the force. These children team up for a great adventure that rivals all other Star Wars novels. This book is so fantastic that I would recommend it to Star Wars fans and non-fans alike!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2005

    Possibly the best Star Wars book since the Thrawn Trilogy

    Easily one of the best Star Wars books I've ever read, and I've read the majority of them. I enjoyed the New Jedi Order, but reading Yoda: Dark Rendezvous, I realized that this is what makes a masterpiece. The only Star Wars novels I've read that I liked better were Heir to the Empire, Dark Force Rising, and The Last Command, comprising the legendary (by Star Wars EU standards) 'Thrawn Trilogy' by Timothy Zahn - written in the early 1990s. Don't get me wrong - I love Allston's work, and I loved the Hand of Thrawn Duology (also by Zahn) that came before Sean Stewart ever wrote this book, but there's something about Dark Rendezvous.... Maybe it's the way Yoda is handled. One of my favorite things to do with Star Wars books is to read the lines of movie characters and try to imagine them saying that. Yoda was perfect that way. Everything he said and did, I could see him saying and doing. For instance, there was a scene in the Jedi Temple infirmary where Scout (who I'll get to later)- --SPOILERS-- -learned that she was to become the apprentice of Jai Maruk, when she was sure that she was going to be rejected as a Jedi Padawan and sent to the Agricultural Corps. Scout begins to sob and Jai asks why she is crying? Shouldn't she be happy? Yoda responds by saying something to the effect of a band has been around her heart, and now that it is gone, it is too much for her to take in all at once. To use his wording, 'Stings, it does!' Scout cries out that it is exactly how she feels, then asks Yoda, 'How did you know?' Yoda leans over as if to whisper in his ear, then shouts, 'Grand Master of Jedi Order am I! Won this job in a raffle I did, think you? Master Yoda knows these things. His job it is!' --END SPOILERS-- It was quite possibly the greatest section of EU with a movie character (and how underexplored the EU Yoda is!) that I had ever read. But the best was yet to come. Scout was, I believe, at the time that Stewart wrote this book, probably a fairly original concept. I think only Tionne and maybe Tekli from post-Original Trilogy EU had explored the concept before, and Scout is a lot younger in age (only 14 years old). A Jedi apprentice without much strength in the Force. Further distinguishing her from the likes of Tionne, who preferred to yodel Jedi ballads and recite old poetry to compensate for her weakness in the Force, Scout feels that she has to rely upon guile and wits to win in sparring matches against other Jedi. The thing is that Stewart fell prey to the classic Star Wars cliche of introducing a feisty, red-haired female. At least make her blonde! Oh well... When we are first introduced to Scout, she and her peers are about to engage in a dueling tournament at the Jedi Temple. As one reviewer at TheForce.Net put it, this little addition made the Temple feel more like Hogwarts than the movies made it out to be. Which is good, considering that in the young readers' Jedi Apprentice series (which I am now forced to admit that I did enjoy), a teenaged Obi-Wan Kenobi and his fellow apprentices do seem to enjoy life at the Temple. Scout chooses to use her wits rather than her Force powers, and- --SPOILERS-- -ends up winning the tournament, despite incurring a fellow student's anger when she uses a trick involving her grabbing onto the other's lightsaber blade rather than surrendering to force the student into a position where Scout could and did claim victory. --END SPOILERS-- My biggest gripe with the tournament itself was that Stewart made constant references to such things as 'wrist locks' and 'throat holds'. Not much for the traditional lightsaber sparring seen in, uhhh, everywhere else, eh? Kinda throws people out of the story, but it's not bad enough to drop a 5-star rating to a 4. Maybe a 10-star rating to a 9.5, but meh. I can live with it. Scout, through this tournament, proves to be a fairly original, original character (which is getting to be surprisingly rare these days, and I

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2005

    If only the movies were this good....

    Here is how I wish the first two Star Wars movies had been made: Episode I could have been Luceno's Cloak of Deception along with the existing podrace and Darth Maul duel from Phantom Menace while Episode II could have started with the ending minutes of the movie and continued to include this book. Books like this one and the Original Trilogy movies are the only thing keeping me interested in Star Wars.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2004

    Top of the series

    I believe I own every paperback Star Wars book ever published(thank God for Barnes and Noble.) I was mildly surprised to find that this book is probabley the best of them all. Sean Stewart did a phenomenal job of storytelling. I sincerely hope that Sean will once again pick up the pen and add to the Star Wars saga.....

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    terrific installment in the Star Wars saga

    After the battle of Genosiss, the republic is plunged into a galaxy wide war led by Count Dooku, once a Jedi in training who studied with Yoda. Now he turns to the dark side of the force answering only to his master Darth Sidious. The count has captured Jedi Knight Jai Moruk and has him deliver a message to Yoda to see if they can negotiate a peace with the stipulation that Yoda must come to him on the planet Vjon; a place where the dark side of the force is very strong.--- After living eight centuries, Yoda knows he probably will be walking into a trap and sets up a diversion to avoid being captured by Dooku¿s minions. Accompanying Yoda to Vjon is Jedi Masters Jai Marak, Master Leon, their padawans (apprentices), Scout and Whie and Whie¿s manservant robot Fidelis. The force in Scout is weak but she has an important role to play in the upcoming confrontation between Yoda and Dooku as both try to persuade the other that it isn¿t too late to change sides.--- Sean Stewart has written in exciting Star Wars novels filled with action and adventures that is typical of the space opera sub-genre. He doesn¿t neglect his characters and in a surprise twist readers and Dooku realize that he still has a chance to take the road Yoda chose if he dares to betray his master. Fidelis is a robot butler who offers comic relief when the tension to threatens to overwhelm the audience. DEAD RECKONING is a terrific installment in the Star Wars saga.--- Harriet Klausner

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    Posted January 13, 2010

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    Posted January 14, 2012

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    Posted February 9, 2011

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    Posted January 13, 2012

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    Posted June 15, 2014

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