Customer Reviews for

Annihilation: Star Wars (The Old Republic)

Average Rating 4.5
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

Practice makes perfect and Annihilation may be Karpyshyn¿s stron

Practice makes perfect and Annihilation may be Karpyshyn’s strongest novel yet. With a small, tight nit cast of characters, Drew presents an espionage story interwoven with personal conflicts. On the surface there are space battles, lightsaber fights, and gripping spy m...
Practice makes perfect and Annihilation may be Karpyshyn’s strongest novel yet. With a small, tight nit cast of characters, Drew presents an espionage story interwoven with personal conflicts. On the surface there are space battles, lightsaber fights, and gripping spy missions. But beneath that is a subtle exploration of emotional turmoil. Whether it’s the exploration of a much more relatable dark side when a person becomes consumed with anger, or the burden and doubts of duty, there’s a clear emphasis on showing the depth of the human character.

The book has a great start that immediately perks the imagination with dozens of questions. Rather than diving into a mission with Theron, it actually begins with his birth and his mother, Satele Shan. It takes a poignant look at Jedi pregnancy. The prologue, while brief, manages to explore the emotional complexity of the issue. Even at this time, the Jedi code still frowns on relationships. It’s a unique and touching way to start off. Personally I’d say it’s on par with the shocking and tantalizing start of James Luceno’s Darth Plagueis.

From there the story jumps to Nar Shaddaa to introduce Theron Shan. Unlike the stars of most Star Wars novels, Theron is not Force-sensitive. Not even a little bit. No Force pushing, no lightsaber, and no danger sense. But Theron isn’t a helpless individual. Like Han Solo, he relies on skill and the occasional ally to get by. And maybe a little luck. For anyone who has read the Agent of the Empire comics, Theron is similar to Jahan Cross. They’re both intelligence agents working for the prospective governments to battle the enemy using both covert and overt methods.

Theron is not alone, though. A decent chunk of the book gives page time to Jedi Master Gnost-Dural. There’s also a female Twi’lek named Teff’ith who Theron has a complicated, non-romantic relationship with. Both Gnost and Teff’ith provide some variety to the story. Gnost is the former master of the story’s primary antagonist, Darth Karrid. Teff’ith, on the other hand, is a reluctant, cavalier ally seemingly motivated by credits, but buried down deep…real deep…has a heart. They also provide a couple real good laughs toward the end.

On the opposing team is Darth Karrid and the Sith. Karrid doesn’t play as big of a role as we’ve seen from other Sith in Karpyshyn’s novels. Her role is definitely smaller than Scourge’s in Revan. She also has a very peculiar relationship with her ship, the Ascendant Spear, which becomes a major focus. Blending technology and biology, she can connect with the Spear and empower it with the Force. The result is that both she and her ship are a force to be reckoned with.

One thing that really pushed Annihilation to a new level was the flow of the story. It kicked off strong, took a step back to build things up, and then consistently moved forward with a strong focus. Unlike Revan, there’s no break midway through the story. And unlike the Bane Trilogy, we get the whole story in one book. Drew manages to develop Theron as a likeable character early on, yet surprisingly pulls off a depth to the story through the supporting characters. While Theron’s character is explored and faced with some dramatic choices, it’s the supporting cast that plunges into both intellectual and emotional depths. By doing so, the story is able to move forward without slowing down. In between the action, we get short bursts from the Dark Council, the Republic leadership, and Theron’s allies that provoke questions and reflection on the characters and the story. There’s some nice concepts to chew on and I love how it added layers to the story.

Without spoiling anything, Annihilation is a great story. Personally, I liked it better than Revan. While Theron is no where near the same magnitude as Revan the character, the storytelling is superior. Again, this is helped by having a smaller time span to cover with no need for a time break in the middle. But another factor is the strength of the supporting cast and the directions Drew goes with them. Some of the intellectual and emotional explorations are as deep as those seen in books like Paul S. Kemp’s Riptide and Deceived. In a way, Drew is able to combine the best elements of a fast paced adventure story with a slower, more reflective character tale that ends with a pacing that’s just right.

posted by Skuldren on November 17, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

S LEGSTAOLDREPUB

This lookz great i cant wait for it to come out

posted by 18117629 on August 7, 2012

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  • Posted November 17, 2012

    Practice makes perfect and Annihilation may be Karpyshyn¿s stron

    Practice makes perfect and Annihilation may be Karpyshyn’s strongest novel yet. With a small, tight nit cast of characters, Drew presents an espionage story interwoven with personal conflicts. On the surface there are space battles, lightsaber fights, and gripping spy missions. But beneath that is a subtle exploration of emotional turmoil. Whether it’s the exploration of a much more relatable dark side when a person becomes consumed with anger, or the burden and doubts of duty, there’s a clear emphasis on showing the depth of the human character.

    The book has a great start that immediately perks the imagination with dozens of questions. Rather than diving into a mission with Theron, it actually begins with his birth and his mother, Satele Shan. It takes a poignant look at Jedi pregnancy. The prologue, while brief, manages to explore the emotional complexity of the issue. Even at this time, the Jedi code still frowns on relationships. It’s a unique and touching way to start off. Personally I’d say it’s on par with the shocking and tantalizing start of James Luceno’s Darth Plagueis.

    From there the story jumps to Nar Shaddaa to introduce Theron Shan. Unlike the stars of most Star Wars novels, Theron is not Force-sensitive. Not even a little bit. No Force pushing, no lightsaber, and no danger sense. But Theron isn’t a helpless individual. Like Han Solo, he relies on skill and the occasional ally to get by. And maybe a little luck. For anyone who has read the Agent of the Empire comics, Theron is similar to Jahan Cross. They’re both intelligence agents working for the prospective governments to battle the enemy using both covert and overt methods.

    Theron is not alone, though. A decent chunk of the book gives page time to Jedi Master Gnost-Dural. There’s also a female Twi’lek named Teff’ith who Theron has a complicated, non-romantic relationship with. Both Gnost and Teff’ith provide some variety to the story. Gnost is the former master of the story’s primary antagonist, Darth Karrid. Teff’ith, on the other hand, is a reluctant, cavalier ally seemingly motivated by credits, but buried down deep…real deep…has a heart. They also provide a couple real good laughs toward the end.

    On the opposing team is Darth Karrid and the Sith. Karrid doesn’t play as big of a role as we’ve seen from other Sith in Karpyshyn’s novels. Her role is definitely smaller than Scourge’s in Revan. She also has a very peculiar relationship with her ship, the Ascendant Spear, which becomes a major focus. Blending technology and biology, she can connect with the Spear and empower it with the Force. The result is that both she and her ship are a force to be reckoned with.

    One thing that really pushed Annihilation to a new level was the flow of the story. It kicked off strong, took a step back to build things up, and then consistently moved forward with a strong focus. Unlike Revan, there’s no break midway through the story. And unlike the Bane Trilogy, we get the whole story in one book. Drew manages to develop Theron as a likeable character early on, yet surprisingly pulls off a depth to the story through the supporting characters. While Theron’s character is explored and faced with some dramatic choices, it’s the supporting cast that plunges into both intellectual and emotional depths. By doing so, the story is able to move forward without slowing down. In between the action, we get short bursts from the Dark Council, the Republic leadership, and Theron’s allies that provoke questions and reflection on the characters and the story. There’s some nice concepts to chew on and I love how it added layers to the story.

    Without spoiling anything, Annihilation is a great story. Personally, I liked it better than Revan. While Theron is no where near the same magnitude as Revan the character, the storytelling is superior. Again, this is helped by having a smaller time span to cover with no need for a time break in the middle. But another factor is the strength of the supporting cast and the directions Drew goes with them. Some of the intellectual and emotional explorations are as deep as those seen in books like Paul S. Kemp’s Riptide and Deceived. In a way, Drew is able to combine the best elements of a fast paced adventure story with a slower, more reflective character tale that ends with a pacing that’s just right.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2012

    Probably the best of the Sith/TOR era books I've read and that's

    Probably the best of the Sith/TOR era books I've read and that's even including the Revan and Bane books. Absolutely worth the read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2013

    Tap to see recomendation

    HIGHLY RECOMENDED

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2013

    Good read

    Worth a buy

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2012

    Intresting

    Theron Shan is cool and I enjoyed how the story had both of his parents in it; I liked how it it begsn with Theron's birth and did not reveal his father till a good way through the book

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2014

    This Book Is Great!!!!!!!!!!

    This book is awesome and is one of my favorite Star Wars books and I have read lots and lots of them.It is packed with action and has a couple of lightsaber duels too.Plot:Theron Shan is on vacation and his path crosses with an secret agent who works for the Republic.He saves some POWs who were about to be sold as slaves by a Hutt.This gets him in big trouble with his boss,Marcus.Soon Theron is on a mission to destroy a sith superweapon which is under control of a ruthless sith lord.This book is definitely 5 stars. If I could rate this book over 5 would rate it 10000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 stars.This book is AWESOME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  • Posted July 18, 2014

    An Incredibly Fun Book Theron Shan: son of Jedi Grandmaster Sat

    An Incredibly Fun Book

    Theron Shan: son of Jedi Grandmaster Satele Shan, descendent of the famous Jedi-turned-Sith-turned-back-to-Jedi Revan and Bastila Shan, and (wait for it) NOT Force sensitive. That’s right, despite his rich lineage in the Jedi Order the hero of Annihilation lacks any ability to use the Force. On top of it all, his mother has effectively disavowed him as the secret of his parentage would be the biggest scandal this side of the Hydian way. Not surprisingly, Theron, accustomed to secrecy, chooses a career in Republic intelligence and when the Sith acquire a new weapon capable of decimating starfleets, the Republic assigns him to take it down.
    The plot of the novel is fairly standard: the Sith Empire has a superweapon and our heroes attempt to stop it, nothing that hasn’t already been done. Despite this, the strongest part of Annihilation would be its characters - Theron’s backstory alone is enough to pique interest. A common theme in Star Wars is the hereditary nature Force-sensitivity causing characters related to some great Jedi (e.g Luke) to be locked-in to be great Jedi themselves. In contrast, Theron has found his own path fighting battles of information rather than of lightsabers. What’s more, Theron often comes off as cynical towards the Jedi believing them to be somewhat overrated but never to the point of disrespect which I found quite refreshing. Add to that his tendency to disregard orders and he makes for a very fun character to read.
    Other characters include Teff’ith the smuggler who reluctantly found her way into Theron’s team and Gnost-Dural, a Jedi Master who must come to terms with the fact that his fallen Padawan is the very enemy the three of them must face (and, incidentally, he’s the guy who voices the galactic timeline record videos). This slew of colorful characters made for a very entertaining character dynamic reminiscent of Luke’s first trip aboard the Millennium Falcon and allowed for great dialogue between them.
    To fully enjoy this novel one has to come in with the right expectations. Don’t go in expecting a deep story, compelling narrative, or philosophical views of the nature of the Force. Instead, expect a fun story full of action, suspense, and humor. I would also recommend being familiar with some parts of The Old Republic video game as the book does make references to characters and events in the game, but the book can still be enjoyed without that knowledge.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2014

    Best book ever

    Awsome fiting and dueling

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2014

    Whoo

    Out most awesome

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2014

    The dest

    Best book ever. So Coool

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2013

    Satele Shan!

    Yay!

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2013

    Wow

    Great character and story. Hope there is more to follow! Best swtor novel so far

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2013

    Awesome,amazing

    Omg buy this awesome exiting book

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2012

    Good Read for Star Wars Fans

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2012

    Help

    Is this book taking place right where revan left off?

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 16, 2012

    GREAT BOOK!!!!!!

    Best star wars the old republic book ive read

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2012

    Best selling awesome book ever

    Its the best book ive ever read in the starwars books.people should go to the store to get these books otherwise barnes and noble will go out of buisness

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2012

    Great book and great story. Another amazing Star Wars The Old Re

    Great book and great story. Another amazing Star Wars The Old Republic novel. I can't wait for the next one!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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