Customer Reviews for

Star Wars X-Wing #10: Mercy Kill

Average Rating 4
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Most Helpful Favorable Review

9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

The Legend of the Flying Pig...Finally!

As odd as it might sound, my initial impression of Mercy Kill was “this isn’t a dumb book.” What I mean by that is that there’s a lot more to it than just a fun Star Wars action and adventure. There’s meaning here. Characters are created with frustrating flaws, but Al...
As odd as it might sound, my initial impression of Mercy Kill was “this isn’t a dumb book.” What I mean by that is that there’s a lot more to it than just a fun Star Wars action and adventure. There’s meaning here. Characters are created with frustrating flaws, but Allston maintains an interest that implores the reader to questions why. There’s an underlying compulsion to look deeper and find the truth, be it with the characters or the plot. There’s a sense of depth there that’s very nice. Sure, on the surface there’s some fun action but beneath that is the good stuff.

There’s a lot of layers to Mercy Kill. On top is a mission to find evidence of General Thaal’s crimes. Enveloping that is some fun, action twisting spy schemes and Wraith humor. There are a lot of good elements that make the book an enjoyable Star Wars story, but Allston doesn’t stop there. Below the surface plot and Wraith action is a character drama that adds a lot of emotional weight to the story. This may be an X-Wing novel and a Wraith book, but at it’s heart, it’s a story about Piggy.

It’s not often that we get to see minor Expanded Universe characters explored in such detail. Piggy was a fun and interesting character in the old Wraith books and in the Rebel Lines duology during the NJO. However, I never in my wildest dreams expected him to get his own book. Not only that, but Allston takes that fan character and uses him to explore a plot line entrenched with emotion. This isn’t the story of a super funny, talking Gamorrean who can fly. This is a story about a veteran of the Yuuzhan Vong war whose been pulled in for one more mission. He’s suffered in war. He has ghosts that haunt him. Allston sheds some light on the soldiers of the EU and the guilt and grief they must deal with. He illustrates the effects these wars have on the people, and he also shows what they must go through to deal with it.

Overall, I loved how the simple idea of a Wraith book became something much more complex, and yet still accomplished both tasks. This is a novel that’s fun and is also one that makes you think. Together it’s pure entertainment on the page.

posted by Skuldren on August 7, 2012

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Most Helpful Critical Review

1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

What's here is okay, but it's not the return of the Wraiths I was hoping for.

The intrepid spies, pilots, and sharpshooters of Wraith Squadron are back! Well, kind of. In a completely not really sort of way. If this story is "getting the band back together", it uses the Axl Rose style instead of the Blue Brothers.

The main character is a pilot...
The intrepid spies, pilots, and sharpshooters of Wraith Squadron are back! Well, kind of. In a completely not really sort of way. If this story is "getting the band back together", it uses the Axl Rose style instead of the Blue Brothers.

The main character is a pilot featured in the Wraith trilogy from earlier in the X-Wing series. And he's recruited by another member of the old Wraith squadron days into the events of this book. And we have a cameo appearance by a few others as they show up for a scene or two and then disappear. But everyone else in the cast is either a totally new face to the series, or the offspring of characters we've followed before. And that's about all the description we get for some of these new characters. They're the offspring of characters X and Y, and are highly skilled at Z, and there's your character development. The timeline at the start of the book makes me think that there's a thirty to forty year gap between the last Wraith Squadron story and the start of this book, so I guess its probably for the best that we have some new blood to play with. But everyone of the other X-wing titles where we've started with a ninety percent new cast has done a better job of introducing the new guys and gals to the reader. Now maybe part of that is my perspective. I fell away from the Star Wars novels before the events of the New Jedi Order series. So I missed that, the Legacy of the Force novels, and the Fate of the Jedi books. And maybe if I had read through all of those novels, I would have been introduced to some of these characters sooner.

As for the plot, it's a little fuzzy early on. There was a moment about half way through the book where it finally clicked for me, and I was able to go "okay, this is why they've been brought together, and this is the enemy they're going after". And at that point, I was invested in the story. But at the same time, I was wondering if I had missed the early explanation of what was going on. If a brief sentence or two of why this story was taking place was missed while the squadron pulled a job or two to establish a cover identity. I almost felt like I needed to re-read the first half to figure out where the second had come from. But after I bought in, I was happy. The usual Allston sense of humor was there, and I cared enough about the main character to find out what was going to happen to him. I was even willing to accept that for an X-Wing title, this features the least amount of space fighter combat I've ever read in a Star Wars book.

What's here is okay, but it's not the return of the Wraiths I was hoping for

posted by 10068023 on August 19, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2012

    M

    Mersy kill? Wut is wit long revews peeple?

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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