Customer Reviews for

Station to Station

Average Rating 5
( 8 )
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5 Star

(7)

4 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Station to Station

    This review is brief, but just provides a different side of the argument. It's hard to make an argument when albums only get rated when people really like them. Station to Station has a unique sound as a whole. Each song, though each with their own individual touches, relies on a similar vocal pattern and song structures that the other songs on the album use. "TVC 15" is the most estranged song (lyrically) on the album, while songs like "Stay" and "Wild is the Wind" (jab at more sophisticated lyrics). "Golden Years" and "Station to Station" both contain somewhat of a funky vibe; more like casual listening music rather than something moving. The high point of this album by far, in this reviewers opinion, is "Wild In The Wind". The sole ballad on this album, it's a cover of the Johnny Mathis song by the same title, and subsequently has some of the most powerful lyrics on the album. David Bowie has a knack for bringing his own vocal and musical influence on his the songs he covers (i.e., "God Only Knows" of Bowie's album Tonight), and the results are beautiful. Overall, I don't feel that this album represents Bowie at his best. However if you are a Bowie fan (like I am) you may want to get it, if not only for the powerful "Wild Is The Wind", then to subject to yourself to Bowie in all forms.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    The White Duke's masterpiece

    By 1976 Bowie's genius was on top due to his cocaine-induced paranoia and his pretension to give to rock/pop a new avant-garde direction. The result was this amazing Station to station, a perfect album that shows rock, soul, disco, jazz and pop with a cold, robotic and experimental touch. Station to Station is undoubtedly the definitive Bowie's album, along with Low, Ziggy Stardust, Hunky Dory, Scary Monsters and Heroes.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Six songs of genius!

    This may very well be Bowie's finest album. The title track is certainly his finest song, a ten minute epic that builds up slowly and exciting before erupting into a veritable explosion of taut funk and irresistible swagger. 'Golden Years', 'TVC15' and 'Stay' are three amazing disco/funk/pop/soul diamonds, the latter being an outragously underrated song in the Bowie canon. 'Word on a Wing' and 'Wild is the Wind' are beautifully overwrought ballads, which help to cool the mood down a bit, and they are lovely, but it's the funky numbers which make Station to Station an absolute masterpiece. The transition from the 'The return of the Thin White Duke...' to the 'Once there were mountains...' section in 'Station to Station' is worth buying the album on it's own for. Forget whatever Bowie's up to now, this is the absolute real deal, Bowie will never top his 70's work, and this is just one of many glorious classics from that time. Go get it now, now, NOW!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Bowie classic

    Including only six songs, each one on this album is an instant classic. It's an concept album, departing from a melancholic, aristocratic point of view. Bowie has found on this album his new identity, The Thin White Duke, after his departing from glam rock. Station to Station is some brilliant forplay for his Berlin trilogy (Heroes, Low, Lodger), combining avant garde rock with soul elements. Each song is very different, yet Bowie has the talent to make it sound as a whole. The cover refers to the movie 'The man who fell to earth', in which Bowie played the leading role.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2009

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