Customer Reviews for

The Steel Wave: A Novel of World War II

Average Rating 4.5
( 98 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(64)

4 Star

(20)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(6)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 20 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1
  • Posted September 4, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Author Jeff Shaara incorporates two real-life quotes in the earl

    Author Jeff Shaara incorporates two real-life quotes in the early pages of his World War II novel, "The Steel Wave", that help set the tone for their respective country's approach, aims and well-known results:




    "In war, there is no prize for runner-up." 
    U.S. General Omar Bradley




    "We Germans have far greater and more urgent duty towards civilization to perform...WE, like the Japanese, can only fulfill it by the sword. War is a biological necessity."
    Friedrich Von Bernhardi








    "Steel Wave" is the second in Shaara's World War II trilogy and it excites me on two levels. The first is that it's simply good story-telling. The plots move steadily and the battle 'ambience' is three-dimensional. The second is that Shaara's successfully managed to blend narrative and real-world history. I feel more knowledge about the time period, and my horizons are broadened, without feeling the damning weight of a very dense period in time.




    Shaara does a capable job of describing the vibes and aura of war and how it encapsulates an individual: the smells, the sites, the emotions. The fictional Jesse Adams, a paratrooper who's dropped behind the German lines on D-Day, and who made his first wartime jump in Shaara's 'The Rising Tide', is about to step into the airplane that will introduce he and his unit to this phase of World War II: "Across the field, the engines began to fire, a growing roar, and he put a hand out against the cold metal of the plane, and put his foot on the bottom step of the ladder. The engines had filled every space in his brain, no room for voices, for music or fears. He looked up, high overhead, and realized the sky had filled with stars. He stared for a brief moment -- cold perfection, vast emptiness -- then took another breath, touched the Thompson (machine gun) again, and pressed one hand against the reserve chute on his chest, and climbed up into the plane."




    D-Day is the center-point of the plot that provides focus for "The Steel Wave". The invasion at Omaha beach is told through the eyes of grunts on the ground (on both sides of the lines). The staccato narrative builds an undeniable tension, and evokes what can only be imagined for those of us who've never experienced something like it.




    Shaara has an eye for the resource management conflicts that must face any scaled wartime effort, and the personalities and relationships that often drive decision making. World War II had a full slate of big personalities, ranging from the overstated arrogance of Britain's General Montgomery to the brashly outspoken U.S. General Patton. Many of these personality 'difficulties' drive smaller elements of the stories' plot, but Shaara certainly conveys that unique individuals and their respective relationships gave General Eisenhower more than a few tightropes to walk.




    Through the stress and very real life-threatening fear that pervades the wartime experience, Shaara expresses how many soldiers could simply 'let go' even when given the chance. In an exchange with one of his men while recuperating in England, following 30 straight days in the field starting on D-Day, Adams discusses what's next:
    Unger nodded again. "Awful darned quiet in that barracks." He paused. "You think they''ll send us to France again? I really wanna go back, Sarge. I think I miss it." 
    Adams absorbed the words, saw the dark in Unger's eyes. 'That's it, kid. You miss it. So do I."




    Shaara's characterizations are not the strength of the book, but the plot and the seamlessly interwoven history and story-telling is was makes "Steel Wave" a terrific and edifying read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2012

    Great book for WWII buffs

    Enjoyed the read, the way the story was told. I've read 3 of 4 in the series in chronological order (by accident) and I have really enjoyed all of them.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 31, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Good Book

    These are nice easy reads that I have enjoyed. Jeff has taken a very well known event and given you a sense of being there during the time.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 7, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    In depth view of WWII from a closer look

    I found this book to be an excellent view of the war in a way that I could relate to the feelings and fears of the characters the author uses to bring it to life. I really enjoy the style of the author and have read all of his books so far. I really felt disappointed when I read the last chapter. I would have wanted even more. I am looking forward to reading the third part of this WWII trilogy when it is finally in print.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 11, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    You can still learn something new on Normandy Invasion

    After all the movies and books I thought I knew the story, but the political aspects I did not realize. Also the story from the German side.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 18, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 31, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 20 review with 4 star rating   See All Ratings
Page 1 of 1